What losing control sounds like

I guess we shouldn’t count Mike Gundy as a fan of the Big Ten’s proposed one-time unfettered transfer rule for college football players.

“The NFL doesn’t have unrestricted anytime free agency, none of the pro sports do,” Gundy said. “Those athletes have to fulfill their contract. What we have with our student-athletes is a four-year contract. It is what we sign and they sign when they are recruited. The NFL does not allow teams to tamper with other players. What’s to stop Ohio State, Michigan, or another major power from contacting a player developed at another school and encourage them to come play for them. Then there is no penalty, no year they would have to sit out.”

The two things I love here are (1) college athletes are under contract; and (2) schools may tamper, but the penalty ought to be on the player.  Gotta admit that’s a convenient rationale, Coach.

Keep in mind that these kids can transfer any time they want; all we’re arguing about is whether they should have to sit out a year or not should they do so.  Something coaches like Gundy don’t have to worry about if they scoot for greener pastures.

45 Comments

Filed under Transfers Are For Coaches.

45 responses to “What losing control sounds like

  1. “What we have with our students is a four year contract.”

    What planet is Mullet Man living on? The scholarship is renewable at the pleasure of the school. If they decide not to renew the contract, they can restrict the movement of the player and force a player to engage a $400 per hour shyster to get them immediate eligibility.

    Liked by 2 people

    • gastr1

      Right. It’s the classic bad contract, where one party has all of the rights and the other party not so much. The one thing the players have is the ability to leave.

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    • Hunkering Hank

      Nobody likes lawyers until they need one.

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      • Not true … lawyers serve a purpose in our society to help right wrongs. The fact that a student-athlete has to engage a lawyer like Tom Mars to get eligible shows what a joke the NCAA rules are.

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  2. Hasn’t Mike Gundy leveraged a raise out of Okie State by threatening to take the Tennessee job everytime it’s opened up during his tenure?

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Reverend Whitewall

    If he wants them treated like the pros, then they should be able to negotiate the terms of their NLI before signing it. Not to mention the fact that pros, you know, get paid. This is such a bad analogy he uses on so many levels, but I’m sure he thinks he nailed it.

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    • What we have here is a failure to communicate…coach’s lips are moving, but there is nothing coming out of that” hey if you pick on somebody, pick on me , I’m a man” face of his…..

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  4. 69Dawg

    The one time transfer with no wait is the best that can be hoped for until the Feds get through with them. It will make it harder on the 7 million dollar men to do their jobs but WGAS.

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  5. UGA '97

    Shorter Gumby: “A kid buried on the depth chart in the Big 12 after 2 years, will ultimately become our public enemy #1 & an imminent threat to the conference when he leaves for the PAC-12/MAC/MWC/AAC….” He warned u folks, it’s the reason the Big 12 crumbles!

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  6. Anonymous

    schools may tamper, but the penalty ought to be on the player.

    Not being able to use the player you tampered with for a year is a penalty to the school as well. Your level of derangement with regard to player compensation is probably equal to Derek’s derangement with Trump. Context is important, and your interpretation of his statement is out of context.

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    • The guy is comparing college and NFL contractual situations as equals, and you’re worried about context? Sure, whatevs.

      I don’t think I’m the crazy one here.

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      • Anonymous

        The dude has spent his entire time as a HC having other schools poach his coaching staff without any repercussions. The ability of his program to compete is completely dependent on finding and developing diamonds in the rough in terms of both players and coaches. Now the B1G is proposing to be able to poach the final component to his programs ability to succeed. I choose to believe that he is speaking out of frustration with larger programs. You to seem to believe that he is obsessed with controlling players and is mad that he could lose some of that control. I think that is more telling of you than it is of Gundy.

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    • Anonymous

      Actually, I should change that to your derangement with regard to player compensation / power dynamics. It all seems intertwined from here. Regardless, it takes a lot of mind reading to assume Gundy would want the player to be punished for being tampered with as opposed to other coach for tampering with his players / program.

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    • mp

      A player, who has five years of eligibility, is forced to use one of those and is unable to compete. Compared to a team, which currently does not have service of that player, continuing to not have that service of that player. They are both punishments. But if you cannot see that it is asymmetric, you are the one with the derangement.

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  7. ATL Dawg

    What an insufferable asshole. He fits right in within the college football coaching fraternity.

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  8. tiredofidsearch

    Anyone please correct me if I am wrong, but I understand the scholarships are basically 4 (or 5) one year scholarships, not a 4 year scholarship.
    Assuming that to be true, technically the school could cut the kid loose after any year.
    So why shouldnt the kid be allowed 1 mulligan ?

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    • MDDawg

      I believe that the term of the scholarship is dependent on the school. They can make it a 4-year deal, but I believe more often than not it is treated as you said: a 1-year deal that may or may not be renewed annually.

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  9. jhorne2000

    Just curious, what would you say to the 18 year old who signs on with the military, and then entertains second thoughts on the matter ? Maybe he didn’t get the post he was hoping for. Maybe he’s too far from home. Maybe he’s in the Army , and realized he’d be happier if he was in the Air Force.

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    • You’re… equating enlisting in the military with a football scholarship?

      Real galaxy-brain take there.

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      • jhorne2000

        No I was really interested in your answer to the question.

        But I do believe that’s a closer parallel than professional coaches you always compare to.

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        • You enlist, you sign a contract that you’ve had a fair opportunity to vet, so you’re bound by its terms.

          It’s not a parallel, though.

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          • jhorne2000

            Not a parallel , I agree. They’re paid a salary and there is national security to consider as well.

            But I’m glad you see it that way – And I assume you have no problem with coaches being held to the buyout portions of their contracts when they scoot for greener pastures – and likewise for schools when they fire a coach without cause.

            So another question : if the illegal labor cartel was busted up tomorrow , and players could start receiving their market value compensation ,
            would it be fair for a player to suffer some sort of penalty to transfer ?

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            • If that’s the agreement both sides entered into on equal footing, yes, that would be fair.

              Fairness starts with the schools not unilaterally dictating terms.

              Liked by 1 person

              • jhorne2000

                They already voluntarily enter an agreement, and nobody hides the rule book. Both sides have fair opportunity to vet.

                Equal footing seems to be our problem – for the vast majority of the players (the ones that have no chance of making it to NFL) , I would argue their college education and other perks are fair compensation for their contributions. I was not lucky enough to have that option.

                Your argument of unequal footing is generally rooted in how much cash flow the top programs generate vs the value the scholarship and other goodies the players get.

                I suppose you’d like to see Nate McBride get his pro rata share of that 44 million in addition to his scholarship.

                That’s fine I guess , but it’s a slippery slope if that’s your standard of fairness.

                On the transfer with a penalty issue – it seems we now know what you are and we’re just negotiating a price. Nothing wrong with that.

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                • They already voluntarily enter an agreement, and nobody hides the rule book. Both sides have fair opportunity to vet.

                  A player can’t hire representation to help him review the NLI without losing eligibility, so explain to me how that’s a fair opportunity.

                  The rest of your comment is projection of what you think I mean, so I’m not going to waste bandwidth on a response.

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                • jhorne2000

                  http://www.nationalletter.org/

                  The mysterious letter is right there for anyone to see. If you can spare the bandwidth , you’ll have to point me to the rule where they can’t consult with a lawyer (or English teacher) prior to signing it. That’s not the “no agent” rule.

                  This is an interesting topic and I enjoy the debate – should you find a slow day in May and want to post how college football would operate in your perfect world , I’m sure that would be a fun comments section too.

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                • Have you ever heard a recruit mention sitting down with his attorney to review the NLI before signing? Have you ever heard of an attorney attempting to negotiate the terms of the NLI on behalf of a kid with a school?

                  C’mon, man. Don’t insult my intelligence like that.

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  10. duronimo

    Most every “contract” I’ve ever signed was a one sided as hell. My contract to remodel 400+ condos near Cumberland Mall …. over 100 pages and they could walk away anytime, for any reason, just by notifying me. I’m wondering why an athletic scholarship is not a contract? I bet it’s less “unequal” than the debt-related contracts many people routinely sign.

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  11. duronimo

    That’s the point. A negotiated contract and the kind most people, including athletes, sign are apples and oranges.
    People sign to get the job, get the car, get a few bucks from the title loan. There are no negotiations. A player contract is no different. Good topic and a good discussion.

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    • Somebody signing a title loan had the opportunity first to review it with an attorney. College athletes are prohibited from even doing that.

      If you’re saying the NLI is a contract, how are college athletes not employees then?

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  12. Bright Idea

    When there is a coaching change or any other disruption at a school what is there to prevent half a team or more from transferring? Yes, I know they can do that now but sitting out a year is a deterrent that likely prevents mass exoduses.

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  13. Redhotchilidawg

    I think this rule may end up benefiting the “haves” more than the “have nots”. If you are lightly recruited in high school and sign with Northwestern but blossom in a college strength and nutrition program, the free transfer would seem to encourage that player to strongly consider transferring to OSU, Michigan, etc to chase titles, better coaching, etc. The programs with less resources already have to find diamonds in the rough to compete. Letting those diamonds walk when you already don’t have enough to compete would be a tough blow. And for the record, many of you would say a coach leaving would be an equal blow to the player and in that scenario I completely agree that allowing a transfer is reasonable.

    I’m not suggesting players shouldn’t have options. But how you feel about it as a school and fan may depend on where your schools falls in the food chain.

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  14. jhorne2000

    Not trying to insult your intelligence , I just don’t think you have your facts right on this.

    The NLI is straight forward. They have plenty of opportunity to understand it or hire someone to help them understand.

    I’ve never known a college football recruit. But I’ve known a few military recruits and I’ve been one myself. The recruiters do what recruiters do – and no one told me about the ugly side. No one says hey kid talk to a lawyer first.

    They’ll hard close your ass in a New York minute.

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  15. Go Dawgs!

    Am I crazy or are there not already rules against schools tampering with players? If I’m not mistaken, it’s already out of bounds for Georgia to decide it likes the third string running back at Alabama and give him a call to see if he’d like to be a starter in Athens. My understanding is that schools can’t contact a player until that player’s name appears in the transfer portal as someone who is already considering a transfer or has already decided to leave.

    I agree with Gundy’s point that if schools ended up tampering with each other’s players as a consequence of a new transfer rule, that would definitely be not-great! But if I’m mistaken and there’s not already a rule in place that prohibits such a thing, then it seems to me that it would be pretty easy to institute a rule, give it some teeth like a financial fine for the offending coach or a loss of a scholarship for the offending school and boom. You’ve fixed the problem.

    Like