“It’s hard to say, but I think it may be a very calculated step.”

Your “no shit, Sherlock” moment for the day:

Last Tuesday, the NCAA stunned many in the college sports world by announcing a proposal to change a policy that dates back to the 1960s. Under the idea, first-time transfers in all sports would immediately be able to compete at their new school, rather than sit a year as they did under old legislation. Not only was the statement’s timing a surprise but so was its path: The proposal is being fast-tracked to go into effect this fall.

At least one conference administrator expressed surprise at the announcement and said his league received no warning. Meanwhile, Todd Berry, executive director of the American Football Coaches Association, a group opposed to the proposal, was completely “shocked” at the NCAA’s statement and said FBS conferences were against the idea as recently as last summer. “Something has happened recently,” Berry said. “I don’t know if it has to do with NIL or what.”

“It feels a little bit disingenuous,” one athletic director told Sports Illustrated under condition of anonymity. “It seems like we’re trying to pacify or appease so people aren’t so hard on us with the NIL.”

‘Ya think?

Christ, these folks have made a cottage industry out of cynically manipulating people’s emotions about college sports.  Why would anyone believe there’s something different going on as the NCAA faces its latest existential crisis?

Or that there are plenty of other folks willing to resort to their own kind of manipulations?

Nick Saban, Alabama head coach

“I don’t know how you manage a roster when this goes into effect. I can’t manage our roster now. Last year, we had eight seniors on our team. We had seven guys go out for the draft and three graduate transfers or guys that ended up transferring. So instead of having 18 seniors, you’ve got eight. You really have a three-year program at a place like this. I’m not necessarily saying it’s going to hurt our program because we’ll do a hell of a job recruiting players leaving other places to come here. But is that good for college football?”

You got any doubt that if you forced Saban into a choice of player compensation or one-time transfers, he’d choose the former in a heartbeat?  I sure don’t.

35 Comments

Filed under Transfers Are For Coaches.

35 responses to ““It’s hard to say, but I think it may be a very calculated step.”

  1. Mick Jagger

    Saban is one of (if not the) best at using whatever rules are in place to his advantage. Hence, all those analysts.

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    • Russ

      Yeah, Saban (and Kirby) will use the rules to their advantage no matter what they are.

      Meanwhile, the Portal Master™ bides his time on Lake Oconee.

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  2. Normaltown Mike

    The NCAA never chooses to NOT do the stupid thing.

    If immediate transfer eligibility led to “dream team” scenarios where the best players periodically leave schools to make a championship run at some other school would significantly erode my interest in the game and I suspect many others.

    By contrast, a QB or RB being on a billboard for a car dealership or cutting a Nike commercial would have no impact on my enjoyment (though I know it would rankle some). I already DON’T care if 1 guy is Rebok and another Nike in the pro ranks. How am I sposed to be upset if it extends to college?

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    • Go Dawgs!

      I’m not sure how much attention you pay to recruiting, Mike, but college football already has a “dream team” problem. Lucky for you, you happen to root for one of the five to ten teams in the country that gets to build dream teams every year. In recruiting these days, the first blue chips who commit then turn around and get marching orders from their coaches and start doing recruiting of their own to try to get other top prospects to come with them to campus. Georgia is stockpiling talent, as are Clemson, Alabama, etc. because these kids are building their own LeBron-DWade situations. The one-time transfer isn’t going to significantly change that.

      I’ll keep saying it: if a kid only gets one free transfer, they aren’t going to just jump around the country willy-nilly – if they’ve been blocked for playing time at Clemson, I’m not sure they’re going to automatically assume that won’t be the case at the next place. They want to be at the school where they started. And, frankly, in any talent-amassing situation, Georgia is going to be just fine anyway.

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      • Dawg1

        If I’m a coach with a 2nd string, though very talented player wanting to jump ship, I’m linking to one Tate Martell’s Miami highlight reel to show the success possible!

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      • Normaltown Mike

        the difference, for me and ymmv, would be if players show out as a Freshman or Sophomore at one school and jump to a rival b/c their team is rebuilding or what not and the other isn’t.

        Yes, Kirby, Nick and Dabo stack em like cordwood out of HS. But if Zeus, George Pickens and Dom Blaylock looked at our QB room this spring and decided to switch to UT or UF and play this fall, I’d be bothered.

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  3. Former Fan

    If they actually paid those guys, people wouldn’t care if they could transfer or not. Let them hire agents, negotiate a contract with the college of their choice, then live with the consequences.

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    • Former Fan

      Just to be clear here… I am saying each kid, through their agent, can negotiate transfer rules and costs of that transfer just like the coaches do.

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      • JCDawg83

        As long as you are fine with a player being “fired” for not living up to the coach’s expectations, that scenario might work.

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        • Dawg1

          Let’s add in that a player can transfer once AND he can be traded once. That’s enliven the experience for the fans and heighten the fun the players!

          But seriously, my only concern about the onetime transfer is to have a date certain to enter the portal. Maybe after the last game and enough before the February signing day. That’d minimize in season distractions yet allow for roster management in/out before signing day.

          Liked by 1 person

          • JCDawg83

            I like the just be fired idea better. If the kid doesn’t live up to his high school highlight video and star ranking in college he can find himself “unemployed” in the college football world and free to go find another team right away. His current team would have no obligation to find a place for him to go. Some want it where the player can walk away any time he gets his lip poked out about something but the program is locked into keeping him on scholarship with all the extra benefits as long as he shows up for practice, keeps his grades and doesn’t get arrested for a felony. If the players and the fans who want a more NFL like model want players paid and to have freedom to transfer anytime they feel like it, the coaches and the programs are going to have to get something out of the new deal as well.

            I would stipulate that the player and the team would have to announce their separation, whatever the reason for it, within 10 days of the last regular season game. Coaches could make room on the roster for more recruits by firing a handful of players who have not performed as expected.

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        • Former Fan

          All that can be negotiated in the in the contract. And let’s be honest, they are being fired now without any recourse. It’s called “processing”. There would be WAY more protection for that if the kids could have representation to negotate for them in a free market.

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  4. Mayor

    Well the kids are gonna get both. Get used to it.

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  5. Debby Balcer

    It’s too bad it did not happen last year so Luke Ford could compete. Cayd Mays sure had lucky timing.

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  6. Debby Balcer

    Too bad this did not happen last year so Luke Ford’s grandpa got to see him play. Cade Mays had good timing no sitting a year for him.

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  7. ATL Dawg

    “I can’t manage our roster now” said the psycopath.

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  8. FlyingPeakDawg

    Well, at least the NCAA seems to have abandoned any pretext of making decisions in the interest of academics, the student experience, or even for the sake of the children. Also nice to see so many University Presidents coming out from under Emmert’s skirt and publicly acknowledging their roles and positions on the matter…oh wait.

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  9. I think my biggest concern is that there will be less and less favorite Bulldawgs, which will ultimately make cfb more and more like the NFL and I watch the NFL about as much as I watch NHL. Oh well. I’ll enjoy it as long as I can.

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  10. TN Dawg

    Why limit it to one free transfer?

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  11. Kirby knew this was coming. That’s why he hired Cochran, the football player whisperer.

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  12. Charlottedawg

    Speaking just for myself I had a hard time enjoying the Florida game when Lawrence cager was making catch after catch against the Gators. Knowing that the young man just quit on his teammates at Miami and transferred here with no life lessons on persistence, commitment and one sided loyalty really bothered me. How could Lawrence not see the benefits of staying all four years as he cycled through multiple coaches at Miami, why did NONE of them teach young cager these valuable and totally beneficial “life lessons”?!?!?! College football, UGA and Lawrence cager would have all been better off had we not allowed transfers. Our country and economy were not built on the ludicrous notion that people acting in their best interests engaging in voluntary transactions benefits both parties, clearly if we had a higher benevolent power limiting our choices and telling us what’s best for us, we’d all be so much better off. I hear that’s what they do in North Korea, that place sounds like a paradise.

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