The logic of amateurism

The absurdity of the FBI investigation into sports apparel companies, schools and high end basketball recruits was apparent from the start and now that the NCAA is turning its attention to the “victims” (ha, ha!), it grows even more so.

Here’s an argument Kansas actually made in response to the NCAA’s allegations.

Uh hunh.  Must have been a complete coincidence that Adidas reps were trying to steer those kids to a program the company was paying $14 million a year to promote their product line.  Not to mention coordinating it with the head coach…

But, yeah, please keep telling me what an unmitigated disaster it’s going to be for college athletes to receive a check for their NIL rights.

7 Comments

Filed under The NCAA

7 responses to “The logic of amateurism

  1. junkyardawg41

    The disaster will not be NIL checks for players. You actually pointed out the disaster I see on the horizon as the Basketball mess unravels. “Must have been a complete coincidence that Adidas reps were trying to steer those kids to a program the company was paying $14 million a year to promote their product line. ” Only with NIL, it won’t be done in the shadows but I would expect to really see apparel companies become lead recruiters for the top 50-150 players in the revenue sports.

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  2. chopdawg

    Apples to oranges? This tweet seems to deal with UK trying to distance themselves from the Adidas payments. Players got money from Adidas only because they agreed to go to Kansas, where they’d be wearing Adidas shoes. So of course the Adidas reps were also repping KU.

    Can’t believe how this Adidas scandal is being swept under the rug, so far anyway.

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  3. FlyingPeakDawg

    Colorado is set to pass bill for NIL rights for SA’s.

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  4. Mayor

    Let me draw a parallel here: How is it any different morally from a rich parent bribing a coach to put the parent’s kid on a sports team (non-playing and non-scholarship) just to get the kid into school there from shoe company representatives bribing a player to attend a school that endorses the shoe company’s products? The feds are using that “theft of honest services” statute in both situations—no? Bribes being paid in both circumstances.

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    • junkyardawg41

      Probably no different than a coach offering a brother/cousin/friend of a top prospect in order to get said top prospect signed.

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