Business as usual

Looks like we’ve got our answer on spring practice.

For now, at least.

*********************************************************************

UPDATE:  Straight from the horse’s mouth.

Let’s hope that change doesn’t involve a player getting the virus.

76 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football

76 responses to “Business as usual

  1. spur21

    Sporting events cancelled but classes remain open ???

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  2. mwo

    That way they don’t have to refund any tuition or fees.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Colleges could rather easily go to virtual learning for a period of time. I assume UGA could as well.

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      • Biggus Rickus

        It’s not as simple as you think. Plenty of professors have no idea how to operate in an online environment.

        Liked by 1 person

        • They may not be able to conduct a lecture online easily, but they can post their lecture notes, reading assignments, and homework.

          I believe UGA told students and faculty to prepare for virtual classes before spring break.

          I’m surprised they aren’t either extending spring break or assigning remote work for next week.

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        • Will (the other one)

          This, sadly, will not stop college administrations from trying it (partly because kicking students off campus protects them from liability, but mostly because they can use it as proof of concept to hire more cheap adjuncts to teach freshman comp online to 100+ students.)

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  3. Granthams replacement

    Every school system in Georgia will be closed soon K thru grad students. I’m looking forward to all the family time.

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    • Anon

      Are you concerned that most people might not be a well off as you and that when students stay home they are having to have Parents stay home who may be first responders, nurses, PAs etc? Depriving other of critical care? Just wondering?

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  4. Go Dawgs!

    I’ll be genuinely surprised if UGA sticks with this decision for more than a week.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Biggus Rickus

    I would give them credit for not giving into the hysteria, but as Go Dawgs! noted, I’ll be surprised if this stands.

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  6. University System of Maryland (fourteen schools, I think) issued guidance to member institutions two days ago to NOT return after Spring Break next week and prepare to conduct classes online-only until at least April 4th…. also said institutions should prepare to finish only-only for the remainder of the semester. Both state schools within 50 miles of me have elected to follow the guidance, even though no reported cases (so far) within 100 miles of them.

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  7. Bucking the national trend, the University of Georgia plans to resume normal class operations following spring break on Monday. And the University System of Georgia intends to keep all 26 public campuses open, contrary to decisions by more than 150 other colleges, including the entire University of North Carolina System, to close down because of the coronavirus.

    On Wednesday, Emory announced it is moving classes online and closing its dorms, followed by a similar decision earlier today by the Atlanta University Center campuses, Spelman, Morehouse and Clark Atlanta,In a letter to college presidents, the University System of Georgia said that it has been told by the Georgia Department of Public Health that the risk of contracting the coronavirus (COVID-19) in Georgia remains low.

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    • Dawgwithabite

      “In a letter to college presidents, the University System of Georgia said that it has been told by the Georgia Department of Public Health that the risk of contracting the coronavirus (COVID-19) in Georgia remains low.”

      Unfortunately, the Senator disagrees with the GDPH. Ask Italy, right Senator?
      Waiting for snarky and contrarian opinion (with no opinion on a solution) in 3…2…1..

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      • Seriously, I don’t get the take here.

        We just had our first in state death today. Across the country, there are a number of university systems and individual schools shutting down — like Johns Hopkins. Eh, but what do those egghead medical people really know…

        Infection to own the libs is one helluva hill to (literally) die on, but you do you, brother.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Biggus Rickus

          Well, the disease is here. Some people are going to get it, and a small percentage of those people are going to die, the same as any other disease of a similar nature. The question is whether or not it makes sense to cancel everything in the world to reduce its spread. I don’t think it does. Economic crises kill people, too, and they make everyone else a whole lot less happy than a case of the flu. (You can spare me the “it’s not the flu” stuff. It essentially is in its manifestation.)

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          • I read a wide variety of news from a wide variety of sources and the TRUTH is that there’s a remarkable consensus among the world’s (and our own country’s) leading infectious disease experts, who ALL say:

            1) it’s too early, obviously, to know exactly how things will shake out, but that it’s completely plausible that
            2) The disease is likely anywhere from 5x to 15x deadlier than common Flu strains, which means
            3) Total deaths will range anywhere from 200,000 to 700,000

            But no big deal, right? Much ado about nothing. Ha. And that’s just the death toll as a direct result from infection. What about additional deaths when (not if) the healthcare system is severely over-taxed?

            Read first-hand accounts from health-care professionals in Italy and get back to me.

            Liked by 3 people

            • Biggus Rickus

              Ah, the consensus. I seriously doubt 200,000 people will die worldwide, but even if they do, you do realize there are 7 billion people in the world and that 200,000 people is nothing in the grand scheme of things, right? Before you get all huffy about my not caring about those 200,000 people, what emergency measures are you ready to take against any other cause of death that you’ve blithely ignored everyday for your entire life? Why should we shut down society for this particular cause of death?

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              • Cojones

                Simple answer: To keep it from spreading so fast that it can overwhelm testing. That will be a steady losing battle, but it may provide the time to get a vaccine ready before that happens. Vaccines have to be produced in such volume that dosage forms would be ready for all after our health professionals are vaccinated. That’s a tall order, but do you have a better suggestion to try to slow this pandemic down?

                Liked by 1 person

                • Biggus Rickus

                  My priority is not slowing it down. I don’t think it’s a sufficient enough risk to take drastic measures against. Maybe I’ll be proven wrong, but I doubt it.

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                • Cojones

                  Get a grip, read and understand the science and get back to me before the next pandemic (there will be another). My degree at UGA and my career , including consulting, is directly involved with the info you are getting.

                  We have no idea who is infected and silently transmitting it to others around us due to lack of testing. If we test sufficiently, we may be able to id the fastest transmission areas and hold the disease to those areas as a slowing process. The idea is to allow time before total infection makes the vaccine unnecessary and our older population is decimated. If for no other reason than self-preservation, you still can’t understand what the loss of older knowledge and leadership will do to us all as a culture, then you need deeper sand to stick your head into.

                  Maybe a quote from Pasteur would help (I confess the French may not be completely accurate): ‘Le bacteria c’est noir dernier’, loosely translates to: The bacteria will always have the last word. That applies to all microbes, not just bacteria, and means that you can say whatever you want and believe that a magical power will ameliorate this situation, but that means nothing to the organism that will keep on infecting and killing. Our best bet is to use science at it’s fullest to get ahead of this beast and establish a quick-action program to confront the next one. This was thought through and acted upon during the SARS epidemic and administrative offices put into place to combat it, but thanks to someone we all know, that office was obliterated for no reason in 2018. The person who headed that office up in 2018 wrote an article for the Washington Post Wed evening. Please read it to understand that once we had an office with plans that would have jump-started our reaction back to Jan and we would not be trying to play catchup as we now are doing.

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              • It’s a minimum 200,000 deaths in the USA that’s the consensus of what’s “plausible”, not the world.

                And, since you ask, the reason to “shut down society” is to “flatten the curve”. See below:

                https://www.statnews.com/2020/03/11/flattening-curve-coronavirus/

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                • Biggus Rickus

                  If you believe that 200,000 people would die in the US, I don’t know what to say. I think that’s preposterous. But hey, experts never overestimate anything, so I’m sure it’s true.

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                • Classic City Canine

                  Better to believe the rando in the comment section, huh?

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          • BA Baracus

            The issue is not whether most of us are going to get it (we will) or whether most of us will die (we won’t). The issue is trying to slow down the spread of the virus enough so that too many of us don’t get it at the same time. Such a rapid spike in cases would mean that we would not have enough capacity to treat the relatively small percentage of those who do get seriously ill from it, leading to unnecessary deaths. Shorthand version: if 1 million people get it all at once, you’re going to have more deaths (due to lack of treatment availability) than if the same 1 million people got it over the course of several months.

            Liked by 5 people

            • And those people sick provide goods and services.

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            • Russ

              Don’t cloud the discussion with logic.

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            • Biggus Rickus

              Most of us are not going to get it, unless you think there are going to be 165 million cases in the US.

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              • BA Baracus

                There are some models that suggest that is a possibility.

                But that’s not the point. The point is, it doesn’t take 165 million cases to overwhelm hospitals. There are fewer than 100K total ICU beds in all of the US. Many of those are already in use. So, all it takes is enough cases occurring at once, and suddenly that 15-20% of cases that require serious medical care is a big problem. The point is that the overall death rate for this is NOT a foregone conclusion. It can rise or fall depending upon whether the spread of the virus outpaces our capacity. So, if cancelling all large public gatherings for a few months slows this down enough to avoid preventable deaths, it’s probably not an overreaction to do so.

                Liked by 1 person

                • Russ

                  Exactly, the number of people who will get it probably won’t change much whether we cancel gatherings or not. What cancelling large public gatherings WILL do is slow the spread so that the health care system can take care of those who become seriously ill and need the care.

                  Doing nothing is idiotic and borderline criminal. My 401k sucks just like everyone else’s does, but it will come back. And it will come back sooner if we don’t break the healthcare system. Slowing the economy is a short term pain to lessen the potential of a much greater/longer pain.

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          • Will (the other one)

            “Sure some people might die, but I want to watch sports damnit!”
            Best case, you’re right and it winds up no worse than the flu. If you’re wrong, more people could die than the civilian + military casualties suffered by the US in WWII. And that would happen because way too many selfish a-holes took the “this is overblown hysteria” attitude and refused to change anything about their day-to-day because they know so much more than those damned eggheads.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Biggus Rickus

              Fuck off with your putting words in my mouth. I don’t care about the SEC basketball tournament or spring sports. This nonsense is affecting a whole lot more than athletics.

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          • Cojones

            My 79 yr-old ass disagrees with you, however the ravishes of this disease are much less at the university-age level. No deaths yet recorded for youngsters (11 yrs and younger) and that is all upside down from Sars and other viruses that have plagued us in the recent past. In my age group, I calculate that 60 yr-olds and above in age are running at a 20% mortality rate. As data comes in, that figure will be refined.

            I have children visiting in early April from Ca, Mt and Tx and have instructed them to keep in touch with the airlines as to preventative measures and to hold them responsible for other airline connections following suit.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Biggus Rickus

              And that’s your prerogative. You didn’t forbid their visit, though.

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            • WCH

              All due respect Cojones (and I do have an infectious disease background) but your biggest risk is having your family come visit you from places afar (albeit in the US).

              I am no doubt cynical and not inclined to listen to, or act upon, anything I hear from a public news source, sports outlet or political figure. I don’t know their agenda (and we all have agendas).

              If you’re not elderly, immuno-compromised or have a pre-existing heart condition and practice universal precaution you should be just fine.

              As for cancelations, suspensions, etc. I can’t help but feel that’s as much a liability issue as it is a public health concern.

              Enh, such is life..

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              • Cojones

                My mentioning the decontamination of surfaces on airliner was misleading when I didn’t write all that we were doing. Besides keeping an ear to the ground, we have discussed the probabilities of infection coming from each area my children and grandchildren were leaving, contact with people in transit and personal ability to carry wipes with you. There are many openings for this organism to exploit and it will only be able to do that through human carriers. We had even discussed (along with canceling) probability of wiping the luggage handles before bringing them from the airport and also decontaminating their hands before touching the car doors and my touching the steering wheel. In short, there were many things we were doing to prevent what we all might regret, not just to prevent family illness, but to show respect for those who surround us and who we may inadvertently and unknowingly contaminate.

                The paranoia involved when dealing with this disease is too much to permit a great get-together and we independently began undoing 6 months planning, but it’s just something we have to deal with realistically. We are canceling our reunion.

                That reminds me, I’ve got to make a run for tequila. Priorities, priorities …

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          • Its clearly worse than a flu. I guess you plan on being one of the people not to die.

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            • Biggus Rickus

              Yes, and I also expect to not know anyone who knows anyone who knows anyone who knows anyone who will die, because even if we do absolutely nothing, a minuscule percentage of the US population will die.

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              • Maybe you can take that bullet on my behalf then. You clearly have no extended family or people working in services to worry about. Go enjoy your island. Your acting like dying from your lungs filling up with fluid is just fine.

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                • Biggus Rickus

                  People die everyday in a million different ways. Most of them probably could have been prevented. How far are you willing to go with that line of thinking?

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                • You didnt deny your island. You seem like a cold callous compassionate person. Go outside and see the sun. Get some exercise. I’m done here. Itll be ironic if your the one that dies though. You have incorrectly stated this is just like a cold/flu, when transmission rates are much higher, the illness makes you much sicker, death rates are higher, and you seem determined to drive you square peg into a round hole.

                  I know you’ll respond. Dont expect an answer.

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                • Biggus Rickus

                  I said its symptoms are flu-like. There’s a difference. And there’s little indication it makes a person sicker than a flu. I’m going to step away myself, as the hysteria only makes me angry. In spite of your judgement of my character, no hard feelings.

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  8. disagrees with the GDPH and the gov who couldn’t spell cat if you spotted him a “C”.

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  9. Dawgwithabite

    Funny…I never made a political statement about any of this. You have no idea if I am a liberal or a conservative. Looks like you tried to find the hill to die on first.
    The take here is that a state government authority says the risk is low for Georgia, but I could almost guarantee you come back with some shitty comment (which you did)
    But you do you bro. Throw shit out there. Never hear you give a solution.
    Damn good lawyer bro.

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  10. Tony Barnfart

    One interesting thing i did hear from that doctor on the Rogan podcast (leading field expert / endorses taking it seriously) is that there are some closings that require a more detailed analysis. K-12 for instance: he said they have studied the numbers and that 38% of nurses today have school-aged children. If even a large % of those are forced to miss work to watch their children at home, what type of strain does that do on the industry ?

    Not sure it applies to a large university, but there are certainly some arguments to be made that for some students—their campus world— is either all they’ve got or are not going to be put in alternatives any safer. Who knows ? Online classes seems like a good idea but not sure about dorm
    closures… are they safer piled into dorms. I don’t know.

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    • Tony Barnfart

      I guess my point is, some aspects of college closure seems kinda like closing somebody’s house or their ground zero. Also, what if you are sending a bunch of infected people out across Georgia (realizing the alternative could easily be more infections at close quarters at UGA) I don’t know what the answer is.

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  11. practicaldawg

    I say cancel the 2020 season, redshirt the entire defense, and let’s GATA with Brock at QB in 2021.

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  12. Dawgwithabite

    And I have an idea about you too. It’s always easy to say everyone else is wrong when you never take a stand for anything.

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  13. When the Atlanta airport inevitably blows up with it. So goes the south.

    I’m going to do everything I can to limit exposure for months. I doubt I’ll be the only one. Spring game is a meaningless event to get people to visit their school and spend money. The team can still run full practices in Sanford and use piped in crowd noise.

    What’s important is how we get through this and then recover in 2 months. How we treat each other, how we care for our neighbors. How we rebuild and how we prevent for the future. A global outbreak has been every sci fi book for 40 years, and yet here we are, surprised it’s real, and not prepared. I hope we learn for the future. I hope we have compassion and care and be smart and aware for today

    Liked by 2 people

  14. Life comes as you fast:

    https://www.uga.edu/coronavirus/messages/archnews-2020-03-12-2.php

    UGA and all of the University System is suspending classes for 2 weeks.

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    • So odd they acted like it wasnt happening a minute ago when it was obvious it was

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    • Will (the other one)

      Glad they’re at least not trying to immediately go to online learning, but boy howdy is two weeks not enough time for professors with no virtual/asynchronous learning experience to get up to speed.

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  15. WASHINGTON (The Borowitz Report)—Millions of Americans are mystified that a former reality-show host is not prepared for this, Americans confirmed on Thursday.
    In interviews across the country, individuals expressed shock and bafflement that the vast skill-set necessary to headline a prime-time entertainment program would somehow not be adequate to address a global pandemic.
    Harland Dorrinson, a resident of Lexington, Kentucky, said, “On his TV show, he sat in a big leather chair and barked lines of dialogue that other people had written for him. I assumed that that experience would come in handy if he ever had to manage an intricate and daunting public-health emergency.”
    Tracy Klugian, of Akron, Ohio, was equally puzzled. “When I first heard about the coronavirus, I thought, O.K., here’s his chance to draw on all his years of being an empty vessel for TV producers,” he said. “What went wrong?”
    Daniela Kartpin, of Minneapolis, said that the reality-show host’s handling of the pandemic had left her shaken. “I always thought that if the country ever faced an existential threat, the best person to grapple with it would be someone who had abused celebrities for our entertainment,” she said. “This whole thing is starting to make me wonder.”

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    • mwo

      Too bad he wasn’t a community organizer.

      Liked by 1 person

      • SnrDawg

        That’s a really tired joke you know. Guy served in the Illinois State Senate for seven years before the U.S. Senate for almost four. He also graduated from Columbia and Harvard Law School. I’m not a huge fan, but he was, you know, far more qualified.

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      • Isn’t it tho’ Any single ‘community organizer’ from any of the 50 states could do a better job of ‘organizing’ a rational response.

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  16. Debby Balcer

    Just saw that spring break is extended two more weeks.

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  17. Waiting for the beach to cancel spring break.

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  18. spur21

    If any of you missed my link above this is an interesting spreadsheet that allows you see what could happen. You can also input your own data points and draw your own conclusions.
    https://www.andology.com/coronavirus-prediction-tool#www.andology.com/coronavirus-prediction-tool

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  19. We done been hit by the TO hoarders. The Walmarts run been cleaned out of TP and hand sanitizer.

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  20. BuffaloSpringfield

    As I stated last evening rather than showing your ass hats to each other IT might finally be a time to find a common ground amongst those who seem to have a common love of the Red and Black. I don’t know what’s next and I don’t feel sorry for the NCAA or the invested corporations that sold the jobs of millions of Americans to overseas corporations that now in turn have owned Pebble Beach at one time. The largest pork producer in the US is Smithfield Japanese owned. Most of your common Beers, not craft overpriced shit is owned by InBev another foreign corporation ( Budweiser, Budlight, Coors and numerous others. That is only the tip of the ice berg. I could list 100’s more.
    You know why we don’t have enough test kits for the Coronavirus because we don’t make them. A small portion is made here and the rest imported. It’s time to quit shit slinging if your on the right or left. I don’t give a damn it’s time to be American and make American pharmaceuticals, cars, furniture, cotton goods and bring back not Silicon Valley jobs but 3 shifts of workers that can afford electric bills, groceries and a house payment and get the homeless off the street.perhaps if we weren’t selling prime beef and seafood to nations around the world you wouldn’t pay $6.99 for a pound of water and fat loaded ground chuck.
    Perhaps Jimmy Carter’s and NAFTA felt a great profit margin could be made by the evolution of a WWM but it’s damn time the United States became solvent and take care of # 1 first. Just like you all say about the southern lizards #FTMF and let’s get this country back again.
    Holy Shit Where’s The Tylenol ?

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