The 2020 balancing test

One thing that’s going to be interesting to watch over the summer is how 2020 regular season scheduling takes shape.  Certainly, there are issues such as player preparation and, on a more basic level, when schools themselves will be opened, but, college athletics being what they are, there’s another fundamental issue in play ($$).

“It’s a whole new ballgame if we find ourselves not playing football, because it affects everything we do,” Bowlsby said. “It affects the largest portion of our TV contract. It affects the largest source of campus revenue, which is live gate. Anything that I say regarding finances, we have to make the assumption that we’re going to be back to playing football in the fall. And if that doesn’t happen, then the underpinning of what we’ve known as normal goes away and we’ll have major changes to make.”

If he sounds concerned, it’s only because he is.  And before you think they can always try to salvage a shortened season by reducing it to conference play, consider another key data point.

 

That ain’t chump change, especially in a year when revenues are already being choked back.

21 Comments

Filed under College Football, It's Just Bidness

21 responses to “The 2020 balancing test

  1. spur21

    This could be that silver bullet – you know – the one that kills the unsustainable arms race.

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  2. What Bowlsby is saying is what’s happening in every virtual board room or executive meeting in America (and probably in the free world) right now. Everyone wants to flatten the curve. Everyone wants kids to go back to school. Everyone wants young adults to return to college or be able to work. Everyone wants to go to the grocery store and be able to pick up toilet paper or other goods. No one (with maybe some exceptions in our political class) wants the economic calamity we appear heading toward. No one wants widespread death of those most at risk or the strain on the health care system. No one wants to be scared to death to go their dentist, doctor, an urgent care, or a hospital if something beyond this virus happens to them. How do you flatten the curve and keep economic activity going?

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    • VV&M

      Modern Monetary Theory. We need to print 10 Trillion, maybe 20. We’re never gonna pay back the 20+ we already owe.

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      • Macallanlover

        Exactly, we are certainly printing new paper, and were never going to pay our debt off long before this additional hit of $2+T. In my adult life, my dollar has become a dime in purchasing power. The US is the only fiat currency that hasn’t crashed, primarily because we are the world’s reserve currency. How much longer will the rest of the world keep us propped up?

        It is why an alternative asset, not linked to the USD, is an absolute requirement for true diversification. 5-10% of your liquid assets is the target I see most often discussed as the amount of “insurance” needed. As with other forms of insurance, you hope you never need it because it means something bad happened. The difference is you need not don’t pay a company for this protection like you do with premiums for home, auto, life, health, etc. Let’s hope this crisis does not trigger another global financial problem, it certainly has all the major players rocking on their heels.

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    • Cynical Dawg

      All professional and amateur sports folded and no one in America or around the world blinked. Football is expendable. I don’t believe there will be a 2020 NCAA or NFL season. I don’t believe American life will be the same going forward. People are not going to want to come together in large groups for a very long time, if ever. It will be a very long time before people have disposable income to spend on season tickets or any high priced entertainment. I believe THIS is what pops the sports money bubble.

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      • 79Dawg

        One of the problems is that it is a vicious cycle. Due to the depressed level of economic activity, most/many are consuming their savings – even if they do return to work quickly, their consumption is likely to remain depressed in the short and intermediate term (as you allude to). Compounding the issue is that, if consumption is depressed, what is the point of advertising?
        To wit, is Ford going to be willing to pay big bucks to run Kirby’s ad right before kickoff of our games in the fall, if consumers lack the disposable income (or confidence) to go out and buy red Ford trucks? If Ford won’t pay top dollar for that spot, that obviously decreases the value of SEC football to the networks.
        I am getting less optimistic with each day that goes by that consumer spending will spike back up once people do go back to work…

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      • Macallanlover

        I have been saying the same thing Cynical, this crisis will have a lasting impact long after a vaccine is found, and the world attempts to regain “normalcy”. This damaged the psyche, and exposed the vulnerability of people who had a very narrow focus about life, and how to evaluate it. It is going to be very interesting to see where priorities are this time in 2021.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. 81Dog

    Welcome to the real world, Bowlsby. I’m sure the average folks who are worried about paying the bills next month are mourning the possibility that suits who have a license to print money because they might not be gouge said average folks so freely.

    I love college football, but it’s way down the list of essentials in my life. You greedy bastards should all remember that going forward.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Chi-town Dawg

    Don’t worry, I’m sure Mark Emmert and his grossly overpaid staff along with the grossly overpaid ADs and their staffs will all take salary cuts to get thru these tough times….ah, who am I’m kidding.

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  5. Granthams replacement

    Greg’s rainy day fund is looking better. It’s really hard to type even a backhanded complement for Greg.

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  6. Bulldog Joe

    If I am reading the tea leaves correctly, I’m anticipating a high / medium / low risk criteria being established at the county level.

    State governors and local officials would be provided guidelines on which restrictions can be lifted based on local risk level. Ultimately, it would be up to the governors to make or delegate these decisions.

    If it plays out this way, I can see smaller, more rural states and counties having advantages.

    Right now, this is only speculation as the healthcare challenges are large. But it provides a scenario to plan for while working from home.

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  7. W Cobb Dawg

    “Bama will get paid $6 million for its game with USC, and UGA $4.25 million to play UVA in Atlanta”

    “Will get paid” and ‘got paid’ are two different things. I’m certain there will be some way of adapting to a new normal. Maybe we’ll be allowed to watch a full or partial season. Sold out stadiums and booked up hotels, probably not…UNLESS a vaccine is developed in a fraction of the normal timeframe.

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    • Cynical Dawg

      ESPN might not be around in 12 months if there is no baseball, no golf, no tennis, no football, no basketball, no auto racing, no soccer, and no hockey. What kind of programming will ESPN be able to field from now until next spring?

      No ESPN? No television money. No television money? No big time sports.

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  8. DCBasham

    Go ahead and contact the insurance carriers, ’cause those games aren’t happening. Liability through the roof for all involved.

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    • The Georgia Way

      Rest assured, we are working to get your tickets delivered as soon as possible.

      #COMMITTEDTOTHEG #LEGALCOUNSELMANDATE

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