When you’ve lost Herbstreit…

Literally.

 

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UPDATE:

184 Comments

Filed under College Football

184 responses to “When you’ve lost Herbstreit…

  1. JasonC

    Too many growth charts still in sharp ascent right now. Until you start to flatten, it’s gonna be hard to get anything going.

    Like

  2. Muttley

    I’ll go out on a limb and predict that the season will be played as scheduled, except that the Georgia-Auburn game, as a precaution, will be moved from Georgia to Auburn.

    Liked by 10 people

    • The 984

      Alternatively, the 2020 season will be canceled, but instead of just moving everything back one year, Auburn will demand we play the 2021 schedule in 2021, including UGA at Auburn. McGarity will agree.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. PTC DAWG

    We have a flu vaccine, folks still get the flu…

    Liked by 1 person

    • FlyingPeakDawg

      Exactly…players wear face masks, what’s the problem?

      Like

    • ATL Dawg

      Thanks for checking in with that hot take from a month ago.

      Like

      • Cynical Dawg

        Herbstreit is right. Think about this: ALL professional and amateur sports around the world folded, and no one protested. This is evidence that sports are easily expendable to our society. We had all better get used to the fact that the way of life we were used to will not be the same going forward. Many Americans will not want to participate in events with large crowds. Colleges will find that it is more cost effective to offer online education and drastically reduce their physical plants- classroom buildings and dormitories. Without large numbers of students on campuses, the justification for college sports will be less tenable.

        Like

        • Napoleon BonerFart

          College football stopped being about students a while back. Schools were converting student seating to donor seating before this started.

          Life will get back to normal sooner or later. While I hope that online education is used more heavily going forward, it won’t be out of health concerns. It will simply be out of greater utility.

          Like

        • RG

          Ah the wisdom of a chap… You think this is the first this has happened? Once we get some clarity on this strain, things will eventually get back to normal. People will not always shy away from large crowds as you indicate. We are a resilient species and we also tend to move past things quickly once the immediate threat is gone. Coronavirus is not the defining moment of our time. We only think so because we haven’t lived long enough or weren’t alive the last time something like this affected us.

          Like

          • C. Z. Marks

            So this is not the defining moment of “our time” because nothing of similar magnitude has happened in our lifetimes. That’s really deep, man.

            Like

    • Pretty much this.

      These people who want to keep the economy in total lock down must have money trees in their backyard they can harvest.

      Are you 80+? Do you have pre-existing conditions? If you can answer “No” to both of those question you will be fine. If you can’t answer “No” then stay home until a vaccine is found. This is something we will all get at some point just like the flu and just like the common cold.

      Time to get shit open again. Cover your mouth, wash your hands, and practice good hygiene.

      More people die in cars crashes every year but I don’t see anyone banning cars. This whole thing is ridiculous.

      Liked by 2 people

      • David K

        If dying in a car crash was contagious and you can catch it like a cold that would be horrifying.

        Liked by 3 people

        • 79Dawg

          What a myopic comment. The randomness of dying in an automobile accident is just as bad, if not worse in any many instances, than the contagion of some diseases…
          Off the top of my head, a mom was driving her minivan down 575 earlier this week, minding her own business, got run off the road, hit a tree, and is dead – absolutely horrifying, and could’ve been any of us…

          Like

          • David K

            Obviously the horror I was referring to was the fear of catching it. We all drive 80 mph down the highway with little fear of dying any second. Of course any death from an automobile accident is horrifying in its own right.

            Like

          • C. Z. Marks

            If fatalities from car crashes were doubling every three days, people would stop f’ing driving until the problem was solved.

            Liked by 2 people

        • 3rdandGrantham

          Totally agree it’s not completely analogous but there is a point to be learned. Less than 2% of the current daily deaths in the U.S. (approx 8100) are due to Covid. On top of that, new data suggest that 60% of Americans are completely immune and asymptomatic. That number continues to be updated higher as we receive more and better data. And for those who do contract the virus, the mortality rate for those under 60, according to Dr. Fauci and Dr. Birx, is .02%. We’re talking remarkably low numbers.

          At the same time, the ultimate silent killer – heart disease – kills 850K people yearly (2200 daily), and heart disease is largely preventable. 30% of first event heart attacks result in death. And if you don’t die, most likely you’ll be faced with issues and limitations moving forward for the remainder of your life, which a much higher mortality compared to someone who doesn’t have heart disease.

          Yet that gets no attention and most of us continue to sit around and slowly kill ourselves waiting this out with an American diet that is total and complete garbage. IMO, it’s utterly bizarre behavior and rationalization, and my brother, who is an invasive cardiologist, and I talk often about this. We worry about something that almost assuredly won’t kill us, all while sitting around eating garbage food which ultimately might. It’s like being afraid of skin cancer and thus you walk around in the sun holding an umbrella, all while eating Popeyes or pizza while smoking a cig. Again, priorities are totally misplaced.

          Like

          • Don’t be busting on Popeye’s and pizza, 3&G. 😉

            Everyone needs life’s little pleasures in their lives.

            Like

            • 3rdandGrantham

              You are 100% right and I’m sorry! I should have said McDonald’s, Applebees, etc. FWIW, every blue moon I’ll indulge in Popeyes myself, but never more than, say, once every 2-3 months. My cardiologist brother is a health/fitness freak, yet even he will indulge in good BBQ 1-2 times a month as his cheat meal of choice.

              Like

          • Huntindawg

            “On top of that, new data suggest that 60% of Americans are completely immune and asymptomatic. That number continues to be updated higher as we receive more and better data.”

            This is really interesting. Can you please link your source?

            Liked by 1 person

            • HirsuteDawg

              60% might be asymptomatic, but I call bullshit on the immune part of that. Just means more people out and about to infect my old, hypertensive, CKD, and cardiomegalic self. I like Georgia football though.

              Liked by 1 person

          • C. Z. Marks

            There is no data showing that 60% of Americans are “completely immune and asymptomatic” (leaving aside the fact that those are two different things).

            If 60% of the population was already immune, there would be little or nothing to worry about. Unfortunately, that is very unlikely to be the case.

            Liked by 2 people

        • Feel like a horror movie short is there. “Omg I just caught the car crash virus, were all about to die” screams, rubber screeching….

          Liked by 1 person

      • More people die in cars crashes every year but I don’t see anyone banning cars.

        My favorite hot take.

        Reminds me of the time I was in a car wreck and I exposed my friends and family to it. Man, all those accidents I infected them with!

        Liked by 4 people

        • 3rdandGrantham

          As mentioned, it’s not analogous, but there is a lesson to be learned in terms of priorities relating to mortality and overall risk.

          Like

          • The problem is, right now we don’t know enough about the coronavirus to make an intelligent assessment of the overall risk.

            Liked by 2 people

            • ASEF

              The other problems of not knowing the full extent are the use of metaphors, which are worse than WAGs at this point (like “less dangerous than driving a car,” which kills at a fraction of a fraction of the rate this virus does) or hyper-focusing on the number dead to date when this thing is just getting started.

              That’s the real strength of the virus. It’s blown up China, Italy, Spain, NYC, and now Albany – and we still have people grumbling, “What’s the big deal?”

              Liked by 2 people

              • 79Dawg

                The question is not, “what’s the big deal”… The question is whether the effects of the measures being taken – which have resulted in a significant lull in economic activity and caused substantial economic disruption for many, many people through no fault of their own – outweigh the benefits of containing the spread of the coronavirus.
                A sustained lull in economic activity will, eventually, have a significant effect on all of us and could directly result in a lack of basic needs – food, clothing and shelter for millions That will start becoming apparent shortly, when many who thought they could simply move the office to home, learn that those who they are doing work for are either cancelling orders for their goods and services and/or no longer have the ability to pay, which will have ripple effects through the supply chain and, again, will eventually reach everyone. (Nor are our smarmy journolists, who keep pounding the doom and gloom hot takes and clickbait, immune – when there are no businesses to, or wiling to, advertise in their papers or on their websites, they will be SOL too!).
                And, just for the record, as of today, I believe the remedial measures being taken do outweigh the negative economic effects – but each day like this increases the risk of severe economic disruption and social unrest. And make no mistake, at some point the economic costs will outweigh the medical costs, regardless of who is President or how many are infected/are dying from the coronavirus.

                Like

                • C. Z. Marks

                  I don’t think anybody is missing the economic costs. But you can’t just wish this away. As Bill Gates put it, it will be hard to restart the economy and tell people to go about their business and ignore that pile of bodies in the corner.

                  We should all want to end the lockdown as soon as possible. The way to accomplish that is to reduce social contact as much as possible (and nationwide) to reduce transmission to a low level and simultaneously ramp up the ability to do large-scale testing and contract tracing to keep the epidemic in check once people go back to work. The more half-assed the lockdown is now (and it is pretty half-assed in a lot of the US) the longer it will be before it is plausible to start letting up.

                  Like

              • spur21

                How two people may be responsible for the death of over 8,000 in a little over 60 days – but it’s OK to ignore the professionals
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_coronavirus_pandemic_in_Italy

                Liked by 1 person

            • 3rdandGrantham

              Given the data we are gathering and have gathered worldwide, I think we actually do (know enough about it). If nothing else, the trend continues to point in a positive direction big time. For example, two weeks ago the U.S. estimate was a 1.5 – 2% mortality rate; now it’s down to .7% as of Wednesday….and that’s only for those who test positive (doesn’t include asymptomatic, unknown or mild cases that aren’t ultimately included in the numbers.

              That doctor in England (their Dr. Fauci, essentially) previously made dire predictions of 500K UK deaths and 2 mil US deaths. Headlines screamed here about his doomsday prediction. Well, he just came out yesterday and basically was like, whoops, my bad…now it’s more like 20K UK deaths at absolute most…our models were flawed. And of course we are consuming better data from China,Europe and elsewhere.

              I predicted previously that Covid will, in the end, kill less people in the U.S. than H1N1 Swine Flu did back in ’09 (16.5K according to CDC). Maybe its wishful thinking but I’m sticking to it for now. And H1N1 was an event that literally nobody remembers at all.

              Like

              • ASEF

                Bullshit.

                His original projections were based on if we do nothing. Well, everyone did something. So new information creates new estimates. That’s how the scientific method works.

                You were on here two weeks ago completely dismissing this thing as less than the flu. Now you’re again peddling misinformation.

                Try to do a better job of vetting your info, please.

                Liked by 2 people

                • 3rdandGrantham

                  Sorry, you are wrong and please be objective. His predictions came out just a few weeks ago. Now he’s trying to make excuses for his insidiously flawed model by saying that England’s lock down saved the day, even though the lock down itself just went into effect a few days ago. Even the wonderfully calm and diplomatic Dr. Birx called him out for his horribly flawed model during the WH PC yesterday…I assume you didn’t catch this.

                  Like

                • 3rdandGrantham

                  Last thought as I have to run for the remainder of day. Let me be very, very clear on this: I’m not one of these a-holes who is basically like, ‘this beer virus nonsense is stupid…let’s just live normal lives!’ I think I’ve objectively taken all information at-hand and tried to make rational decisions based on what I know. And yes, me and my family are taking precautions certainly. (Hell, two of our little kids could be in daycare right now, but instead they are running around the house screaming as both my wife and I are trying to work….not fun at all).

                  HOWEVER, my main point is not to snicker at those who are taking this virus seriously, but to merely point out the blatant lack of focus on priorities for those of us who are worried to death about catching this and/or those who want to shut down society as we know it to prevent all deaths; thus causing irreparable harm to everyone. Again, the odds are overwhelming that none of us here (for ex) will die from this, and I pretty much guarantee that covid will not make the list of the top 10 causes of deaths in the U.S. this year. Yet, we are solely focused on our own demise over this, all while losing sight of all the things that are far, far more likely to do us in.

                  Like

                • ASEF

                  If you’re still focused on the number of dead and not the number hospitalized, then you’re not paying attention. It’s impossible to run a local economy when standard social interaction runs the real risk of a month in the hospital. Add in the hospital might not have enough beds for you, and people are going to stay home.

                  My 30 year old semi-pro rugby-playing nephew has asthma. My 31-year marathon running niece is pregnant and just completed a 14 day quarantine because the husband of a friend in Jackson, TN who was at dinner tested positive. My 50 year old wife has compromised lungs from walking pneumonia 4 years ago. My 84-year old mother is in skilled nursing, and if she passes right now, I will not be able to attend her funeral. My best friend has an auto-immune condition. I could go on and on.

                  Everyone is making local decisions based on their local conditions. The focus on a model run in England a month ago is a political head fake.

                  Like

                • ASEF

                  Why does the National Weather Service update their hurricane models every 4 hours? Because the circumstances change. Not my fault people do not understand how models work or what they’re used for.

                  The model had the CLEAR caveat that it had the operating assumption of “no mitigation effects” and it never said the time frame would be the next few weeks. Again – this is the problem. People who do not understand or like scientific processes dismissing them based on a complete misunderstanding of the guidance they provide. No different than the dude on the beach belligerently pointing out that the NHC missed a hurricane forecast once and by God he’s not leaving.

                  Birk said “right now” – which is a weasel out. She’s playing political games now, which is why I no longer pay attention to her. She’s working from the politics back to the facts she prefers. Fauci works from the facts to a workable policy. Which is why they’ve sidelined him.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • C. Z. Marks

                  He’s not wrong. The Imperial college study said hundreds of thousands would die in the UK if they stuck with their initial plan to isolate vulnerable populations, but otherwise let the epidemic spread to build herd immunity in the population.

                  In response the UK government changed their plan, and is now pursuing aggressive social distancing for the whole population. Ferguson’s latest statements about the likelihood that there will be less that 20k deaths in the UK address the impacts of the new strategy. He is not stepping away from the previous projections.

                  Like

              • PTC DAWG

                Don’t come here with a rational reasoned thought on this…it is not welcomed.

                Like

                • The Dawg abides

                  It’s obvious you wouldn’t recognize a rational thought if it bit you in the ass. If you can’t see how this thing compounds a normal flu season and the extra strain it’s adding to the health care system already, then you’re just being willfully obtuse. And that’s another thing at epidemic levels these days.

                  Liked by 1 person

        • The lockdown purpose is not to overwhelm the healthcare system. Has nothing to do with the relative comparison to car wrecks and heart attacks. We are social distancing so that our grandparents, mothers and fathers don’t end up in a tent next to the emergency room with a doctor deciding who shall get the lifesaving treatment and who wont because of lack of equipment.

          Not sure why this is so hard to comprehend. The hospitals are filling up fast.

          Liked by 3 people

          • 3rdandGrantham

            No, I do understand; I simply don’t agree with the policy prescription at play. According to Dr.Birx during yesterday’s PC, the overwhelming majority of hospitals in U.S. are not stretched at all. My aforementioned brother is at a major medical hospital in a large U.S. city – they are fine. My BIL is the COO of a major hospital in NJ – they too are fine currently.

            I’m sorry, but if we literally are going to: shut down an economy and put tens of millions of out work (leading to suicides, residual deaths, etc), add trillions in debt that we will never be able to pay off, and disrupt literally every life in the U.S. just to ensure that Edna or Gus don’t potentially face a crowded ER in a noted hotspot like NYC – then I’d tell you that you have severely misplaced priorities. And no, I’m not insensitive but am practical. My grandmother died of the common flu last year, as do 20-70K Americans yearly. In light of this, I certainly don’t expect we shut down society as we know it to ensure we eliminate all flu deaths in the U.S.

            Like

            • No One Knows You're a Dawg

              “they too are fine currently”

              “Currently” doing a lot of work.

              Regardless, looks like we’re going to get to find out over the next couple of months whether your trumpified theories are correct.

              Liked by 1 person

            • doofusdawg

              There are sixty positive cases in Charleston County. The largest health care provider, Roper, has twenty five in their system. They also report today that none of the twenty five are currently admitted in any of their facilities. That is great news.

              As an aside I had to take my ninety year old father to one of their emergency rooms saturday night for a non related medical issue. There were zero patients in the er at 11:00 saturday evening. They got him out of there pronto and wouldn’t let me in to even sit with him.

              My point is that many objective journalists are reporting the same thing. No one is going to the er as their first point of contact for minor ailments because they don’t want to catch something and die. That coupled with the moratorium on all elective procedures and you have relatively empty hospitals all over the country. The unintended consequences of this is that some staff is being laid off… and insurance companies are racking up profits. But there is currently plenty of capacity and only a small percentage of cases require serious hospital treatment. This is not to say that there are not big numbers of serious cases in some areas. But it sure would be nice to know the facts before we tank the country completely.

              Hopefully there will be college football this fall but as I said below… if not… Trump is toast.

              Like

              • HirsuteDawg

                If not having football in the fall would make Trump toast I’m all for cancelling the season right now. (Almost) Anything to get rid of that incompetent, blowhard SOB.

                Like

            • Fair points. I too am probably more worried about the economic impact, but based on the info and what has happened in Italy, I think it is a smart move to shut things down to flatten the curve. However, we need to be smart and not seriously damage the economy. So I hope the shutdown ends sooner than later.

              I see two extremes at work here. One is the impact on the health of Americans (millions will die!!!), and the other is the impact on the health of the economy (we are spiraling toward the next great depression!). I remain optimistic that both the structural integrity of both the healthcare system and the economic system to hold out and protect us against both extremes.

              Ask me in two weeks and I might give a different answer since I’ll get a case of cabin fever with the kids in the house and start rambling conspiracy theories left and right.

              Like

            • wvmtndawg

              you’re a fucking idiot. stop it with this bullshit.

              Like

        • Also laughed out loud.

          Like

        • ASEF

          Same publication which published an unlicensed dermatologist as a “doctor” advising deliberate infection and which then had said doctor complaining they edited him in misleading ways.

          Read at your own peril.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Dawg1

            Yeah, better to watch the View and go to the Huffington Post for vetted articles! 🙂

            But seriously, I’d say no publication is perfect when pedaling opinions pieces.

            Like

            • ASEF

              There a ton of really solid information sources out there that do not cater to specific world views, with the starting point of erasing some facts and exaggerating others. But they don’t make us mad, so they’re boring?

              Like

        • No One Knows You're a Dawg

          “Sorry, but the grandparents, along with those with diabetes and asthma, are just going to have to pay the ultimate price for a 3% gain in the Dow.”

          Helluva re-election message there Cotton, let’s see if it works. Most people don’t vote for death cults.

          Like

          • Napoleon BonerFart

            In the absence of enough information to assess the risk of a contagion, what could be more responsible than shutting down the world’s economy? And anyone who doesn’t agree is a racist hate-mongering bigot.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Classic City Canine

              Oh f— off BonerFart. We’ve got more than enough examples (check out China and Italy for starters) to know that this virus is a BIG deal and we do in fact need to temporarily shut down the economy. An economic shutdown as a cure sucks big time, but that’s the way it has to be.

              Like

      • Bob

        Tell that to a good friend of mine who had no preconditions and was 49. Passed two days ago.

        Like

      • Classic City Canine

        Well Biggen, I don’t think it’s acceptable that 40,000 people die every year in car crashes either. Pandemics are preventable and so are car crashes. We have no business trading lives en masse as the price of keeping everyone employed. It sucks that the economy is tanking. There’s real suffering that will happen because of that, but it’s clearly better than experiencing a pandemic.

        Like

    • C. Z. Marks

      We have a polio vaccine, folks still get… Oh, wait.

      Like

  4. Alan

    I guess Kyle Trask will have to accept his Heisman trophy in front of an empty audience.

    Liked by 4 people

  5. C7

    Gee, I dunno, Herbie. However did they manage to play football before there was a vaccine for TB, or polio? Or flu, for that matter?

    Like

    • PTC DAWG

      You can’t mention the flu, not fair. It kills way more people, dominates Covid 19 in all phases of the game.

      Like

    • gastr1

      I dunno, C7. Maybe coronavirus is transmitted far more easily than the other three? Maybe you don’t actually have to have symptoms to transmit coronavirus?

      In all seriousness, it won’t be a vaccine they need. It will be widespread, commonly available tests. When they have that, they can determine who needs to be quarantined and who doesn’t and move forward from there.

      (That’s why more widespread testing would have lessened all of this right now, too.)

      Like

      • C7

        I wasn’t comparing covid to the other three diseases. That’s not the point. And I’m not downplaying the seriousness of the disease. I have a daughter who is a respiratory therapist and others in my immediate family are working with patients every day. So I’m very well aware of the risks.

        I’m simply pointing out the obvious fact that 6 months from now Americans are not going to be hunkered down in their homes (if they still have one) dodging the bill collectors. They are going to find a way to get on with life.

        Covid will still be lurking out there in September, along with many other dangers. But we will find a way to cope, as we always do.

        Liked by 4 people

  6. Jim

    If Herbie is right, we will be looking at an economy that will make the Great Depression look mild, massive civil unrest that will result in more deaths than the virus itself, and food/medicine shortages that will have society looking a lot more like a Mad Max movie than it does the current (or previous) environment

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    • Cynical Dawg

      We are closer to 1789 France than you might think:
      1) an arrogant and incompetent political leader who attempts to rule as an absolute monarch;
      2) rival groups within the noble classes who pay little to no taxes and corruptly loot the treasury;
      3) decades-long wars for empire that further bankrupt the country;
      4) a series of natural disasters that result in an economic depression.

      I would remind those of you who are landlords to tread carefully…during the French, Bolshevik and Chinese Revolutions the first class of people to be executed were landlords.

      Like

  7. 3rdandGrantham

    Disagree with Heebstreit and strongly feel we will kickoff against UVa in early Sept. Sure, a vaccine is a ways off, but we will have better treatments in the months ahead. That, and the virus will subside in the warmer months, along with the fact that new data suggests that 60% of Americans may be completely immune or asymptomatic.

    With that said, older fans with conditions may have a bit of an interesting decision to make, but otherwise football will be full steam ahead this fall.

    Like

    • Cynical Dawg

      Australia was in the middle of its summer season when the virus hit. Middle Eastern countries with desert climates as well as Sub Saharan Africa are experiencing the virus. You’re engaging in wishful thinking if you believe climate will slow this.

      Like

    • ASEF

      Stories of healthy 30 and 40 somethings dropping dead are everywhere. It kills more old people than young, but it kills young people. I’m a dad to two teenagers and a husband. If I go to a football game without knowing who has it or without something medical – a vaccine or a proven, readily available therapeutic – countering the risk infection, I am being more than personally stupid. I am being deeply irresponsible.

      I hope we do have one or both of those things by fall. But odds are we won’t, because this is a new virus, and these things take time. But I am really impressed at the way the international medical and research communities are working on this.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Napoleon BonerFart

        Stories of Bigfoot are all over the place. That doesn’t mean it’s something to worry about. It’s the nature of the media.

        The risk to healthy adults under 60 is exponentially smaller than other groups. Does that mean we should shut down the economy until the risk becomes zero? I guess so.

        Like

        • Really, I had no idea we’re blessed with so many qualified immunologists here at the blog.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Napoleon BonerFart

            Which part of my statement would an immunologist take issue with? Which qualified immunologists are warning of the high risk of death for healthy adults under 60? My guess is zero.

            What I find interesting is how the “shut everything down” recommendations of doctors can’t be analyzed for economic impact. I guess it’s too important to worry about, eh?

            Liked by 1 person

            • The science, real hard factual science with graphs and glossy photos, should be one of the major inputs to a economic decision. If you just “science” then may as well kool aid the entire world. A virologist would have us locked up for a year.

              We cant do that. At some point, we do have to face the risks, and get moving.

              Like

        • ASEF

          Bigfoot? You’re comparing Bigfoot stories to documented stories of lots of non-elderly people who have been killed by this thing? Seriously?

          Yes, the relative risk of age groups under 60 is much less than the risk to age groups over 60. But that’s a pointless and stupid comparison. Right up your alley.

          And no one is saying shut down the economy until the risk is zero.

          Amazing, a post that short and you completely whiffed three times.

          Like

          • Napoleon BonerFart

            I’m comparing anecdotes that get news coverage. Anecdotes <> data. Seriously.

            My healthy 43 year-old neighbor died in 2018 from pneumonia. It happens. It doesn’t mean healthy 43 year-olds are at great risk of dying from pneumonia. It also doesn’t mean we should shut down the economy until no more healthy adults die from pneumonia.

            But by all means, keep preaching about how scary it is and how we’re all at risk and we shouldn’t go to work. FUD always helps.

            Like

        • C. Z. Marks

          “The risk to healthy adults under 60 is exponentially smaller”

          I know you want to use that word, “exponentially,” because you have heard other people use it and you think it will make you sound smart. But you are not using it correctly. It refers to a rate of change (e.g., in infection numbers) that is self amplifying rather than just preceding at a constant rate. It doesn’t just mean “bigly.”

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          • Napoleon BonerFart

            I know you’re trying to correct me to assuage your own ego at the expense of mine. But it would work better if you weren’t wrong.

            Nice try though. Check Webster’s before you try again.

            Like

            • C. Z. Marks

              Webster’s: :
              “ex·​po·​nen·​tial
              Expressible or approximately expressible by an exponential function.
              Especially: characterized by or being an extremely rapid increase (as in size or extent). An exponential growth rate.”

              Please explain how I am “wrong” or how your usage of the word is consistent with that (or any other) dictionary definition.

              Like

    • W Cobb Dawg

      3rdandGrantham indeed. It’s easy for you to say that things should go back to normal. What about us folks who don’t have a towel guy to block Covid-19?

      Like

    • spur21

      Well that’s just dandy for 200,000,000 what about the other 130,000,000?

      I have not seen any reliable information that warm weather will kill the virus.

      Like

  8. Hobnail_Boot

    EVERYBODY PANIC!

    Am I doing this right?

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Greg McGarity, J Reid Parker Director of Bean Counting

    Just a reminder that you have 10 more days to place your season ticket orders. Remember that we graciously extended our deadline by 6 days to April 6.

    Like

    • Bulldog Joe

      If the excuse du jour is “we have to get the tickets printed in time”, can I ask what on the ticket changes if I were to pay for it before April 6?

      Like

    • DCBasham

      Greg McGarity is exactly the kind of feckless, f*ckin idiot that UGA deserves to weather the athletic department thru this storm.

      Like

    • The Georgia Way

      Our printer moved up the date due to the recent changes we made to the back of ticket.

      Rest assured, it is out of our hands.

      #GETTHOSEORDERSINNOW #COMMITTOTHEG

      Like

      • 79Dawg

        Did you strengthen (A) the “this is only a revocable license” language; (B) the “voluntary waiver of liability” language; (C) the “assumption of the risk” language; or (D) all 3???

        I’m going with D!

        Like

  10. Godawg

    Just need to step up production of bubble suits.

    Like

  11. Russ

    I can see the games being played without crowds.

    Like

    • That’s what I see as the most likely outcome if games are played at all. The big unknown is whether campuses are even open for the fall semester.

      Like

      • If campuses aren’t open for fall semester, I’ll have serious questions about whether to pay for my daughter to spend time sitting in front of a computer taking classes in the fall semester. I imagine a lot of other parents feel the same way. If campus isn’t open, there’s no reason not to walk away from the lease on her apartment this fall and tell the property manager to keep our deposit.

        Not opening campuses in the fall should scare the living hell out of university administrators, faculty and staff.

        Like

        • Tony Barnhart

          And then, as you mentioned, what about all the vacancies in properties in college towns when people pull out. Massive defaults flowing up and out through the chain.

          Like

    • If that happens, I won’t watch a minute.

      Like

  12. Scuba

    Based solely on my total lack of medical expertise. My guess is there will be a treatment before a vaccine. If there is a cure there will be football 2020. If by September we are still in lock down mode i don`t see how the economy does not collapse.

    Like

    • C. Z. Marks

      I don’t think we will be in lockdown by September. But it is reasonably likely that we will will still be struggling to manage the epidemic and prevent it from growing out of control, which could make it difficult to hold sporting events with 90k fans. Entirely possible that we will relax the lockdown in a few weeks and then have to re-implement it at a later date.

      The key to getting out of the trap is to make the initial lockdown be as effective as possible and simultaneously ramp up our ability to do large-scale testing and contract tracing to manage or stop the epidemic after we ease restrictions. Basically, what they are doing in S. Korea. Meanwhile we also need to ramp up hospital capacity.

      I think it is possible we can have football this fall, but only if we get our sh*t together. All these people saying it is no big deal, go about your business, are making it less likely.

      Like

  13. doofusdawg

    Not intending to hijack the thread but a lot of you should be happy. If there is no college football then Trump will not be reelected.

    Like

    • Napoleon BonerFart

      Thousands of deaths, massive unemployment, and a world-wide depression would be a small price to pay to replace #OrangeManBad with the stunning and brave leadership of Joe Biden.
      #ICan’tEven
      #LiterallyGiddyAtThePossibility

      Liked by 2 people

      • Admittedly, it would be a sad day for this nation to lose the inspired contributions of Jared Kushner.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Napoleon BonerFart

          Unlike the Biden family, he knows jack shit about Ukrainian energy.
          #ExpertsBackInTheWhiteHouse
          #NoMoreGOPNepotism

          Liked by 1 person

          • Oh, you’re selling Jared short. There’s a lot of things he knows jack shit about.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Napoleon BonerFart

              Yes, but none so vital to national security as Ukrainian policy. The old saw, “As Ukraine goes, so goes the USA,” was never more true than today. That’s why we need the Ukrainian experts back in the White House. To get back to the halcyon days of 2014.

              Like

              • I recognize your obvious expertise on a number of topics, but unless I missed something, one big difference between Jared and Hunter is that the latter has never actually served in the White House.

                Liked by 1 person

                • Napoleon BonerFart

                  Another big difference is that his patriarch was never president. But I suppose you could be correct that Joe would completely change course on using his influence to Hunter’s benefit once he was elected president. I guess we’ve got to elect him to find out.
                  #PopcornReady

                  Liked by 1 person

                • Biden “used” his influence to Hunter’s benefit? Sure, man, whatever you say.

                  Look, I wished I loved somebody as much as you love Trump. Alas.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • Napoleon BonerFart

                  You think Hunter was with energy companies in Ukraine and China based on his bona fides? You think Joe forced the firing of the prosecutor looking at his son’s boss DESPITE the benefit to Hunter personally? Really?

                  I am once again amused by your originally liberal take of #OrangeManBad. Trump can’t be a politician fairly similar to most of the politicians to occupy DC for the last couple of centuries. Nope. He’s completely unprecedented! No other president has given his family important jobs! No other president has lied to the people! No other president has had a hostile relationship with the political opposition!

                  #REEEEEEE

                  Liked by 1 person

                • You think Joe forced the firing of the prosecutor looking at his son’s boss DESPITE the benefit to Hunter personally?

                  LOL. Is that what happened on Earth 2?

                • Napoleon BonerFart

                  You’ve convinced me. When Joe Biden was in charge of managing the United States’ foreign policy with Ukraine, there was absolutely no conflict of interest with Hunter taking a job with Burisma. It’s only the right wing conspiracy theorists who think otherwise.

                  The prosecutor certainly wasn’t looking into Burisma, despite reports to the contrary. That was just fake news.

                  Again, I didn’t love Trump. I just didn’t necessarily think he was the root of all evil. I thought it was possible that the Democrats and the Republicans were just two sides of the same coin. That there wasn’t much difference between them, despite the wailing and gnashing of teeth that their supporters sometimes display. Of course, that was before. Now, your Derek-like rhetoric has convinced me that he actually IS the root of all evil.

                  Jared Kushner is the anti-Hunter Biden. Hunter profited IN SPITE of his father having power. The poor guy would probably be a billionaire by now except for all the profitable gigs he had to give up because of Joe. Can you imagine?

                  So consider me a died in the wool liberaltarian just like you. Some liberty is fine. But not too much. There’s a happy medium. Central planning economies have only failed because they didn’t have the right planners like Joe and Hunter. It will be better this time.

                  #OrangeManBad

                  Liked by 1 person

                • No question what Hunter did was ethically wrong.

                  The rest of your comment is a mixture of happy horseshit and personal insults. Hardly convincing.

                  And you should own your feelings about Trump.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • Napoleon BonerFart

                  I’m with you man. Anybody who thinks that the evidence for Trump being a Russian spy was lacking is in love with him. At least, that’s what I hear from Rachel Maddow, my new vetted propaganda, er news, expert. And obviously, any accusations of Democratic corruption is just whataboutism based on fake news. It never really happened. Why, Democrats are pure as the driven snow. Congress is just like that scene from Lord of the Rings with the monsters on one side of the aisle and the world’s saviors on the other side. And we all know which sides are which.

                  Yes, us rational liberals understand that Trump really is #LiterallyHitler. Let me know where you ordered your pussy hat. I need one.

                  #InpeachFoetyFie

                  Like

                • If deflection is all you’ve got for an argument, you don’t have much of an argument.

                  Isn’t it about time for one of your cool gifs? I mean, those are usually devastating.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • Napoleon BonerFart

                  Come on, man. I’m on your side. I pledge never to miss a chance to state something negative about Drumpf.

                  Imagine a scenario with some dude making a joke about how a global pandemic will be worth it if we can just get a Democrat back in the White House. Someone who didn’t care might just let that slide. But not you. Because you’re committed to the cause. And now, so am I.

                  So here’s OUR meme.

                  Like

        • Maybe you should do a pole. Trump or Georgia football.

          Like

  14. MGW

    People like your dumb ass are the reason this virus continues to spread and kill people, a huge chunk of which are NOT over 80 or with preexisting conditions.

    Also those 80 year olds and those people with preexisting conditions are not expendable. They’re people. They’re Americans. This will likely kill far more Americans than 9/11, except we saw this coming and still can prevent many of these deaths if, as a nation, we remove our heads from our asses right now. Not some of us, all of us.

    Right now, even if I take every precaution I can’t count on staying clean because some idiot like you might be bagging my groceries or handling them along their way to the store.

    And sure maybe we’ll all get it eventually. But if we do like you and for some reason our President suggest, and all just accept that and go back to work now, we’ll all get it at once and the death rate will skyrocket because the healthcare system can’t handle it all at once. It can’t handle where we’re at now.

    But hey, whatever makes you feel smart. Keep your tin foil hat on your head, avoid the fluoride water, and try not to fall off the edge of the earth.

    Liked by 1 person

    • doofusdawg

      Who are you referring to.

      Like

    • Tony Barnhart

      Why is asking about the endgame to the shattering of young families’ lives, the children of which are ALSO not expendable, treated as tin foil talk ?

      And as the days and weeks march on, I think it’s decidedly appropriate to ask folks to define “huge chunk” [of young people dying] or whatever other proclamation is given. As data sharpens, the old clichés actually do become relevant once again. Indefinite risk mitigation to zero is not an adult answer to this. It’s the answer that political leaders give when they are too chicken-shit to make tough decisions.

      Like

  15. practicaldawg

    No football is way more probable than football at this point. Best case, the numbers peak end of April / early May. Then they descend sharply into June / July. But then players suddenly start practicing and get fully conditioned in August? Ummm no. Ain’t happening.

    A slightly more probable scenario would be to shift the whole season 2 months and play it into spring. But that feels far fetched too.

    Like

    • They aren’t playing college football in the spring. The TV masters already have commitments to provide other programming under existing contracts. The university presidents and the NCAA have made it clear that they believe football should be over by early January.

      You play out a scenario where the season starts in late October or November with no bowl games and a playoff in early February. I guess the employees (oops … I meant student-athletes) don’t get to go home after fall classes are complete. You will see players with draft potential shut it down as soon as their team is out of playoff contention to minimize injury risk and get ready for the draft. Additionally, you may have multiple players on each team become academically ineligible for the last 1/3 of the season when they are supposed to be playing in January.

      If they can’t start play by the end of September with an abbreviated schedule, there will be no college football played in 2020 … damn, I still can’t believe that’s possible.

      Like

  16. ApalachDawg aux Bruxelles

    How can anyone make these claims until we get a handle on this?

    Liked by 1 person

    • practicaldawg

      Have you looked around and seen what’s happen to our society lately? Until the basic fabric of our society has been restored (schools opening, people back at their desks, restaurant doors open, etc.), how can anyone believe something as organizationally complex as a college football season will just magically happen? What we see on the field a few Saturdays in the fall is the result of a year-round well oiled machine that’s been completely shut down.

      Like

      • spur21

        “Have you looked around and seen what’s happen to our society lately?” That is precisely why anti gun folks have emptied the shelves of gun shops across the country. When folks fight over T.P. and handy wipes what will happen when food runs low.

        Like

  17. TN Dawg

    If you care about old people, you wouldn’t want football until we can create an environment where there are no transmissible viruses that cause secondary complications.

    It’s only logical.

    Like

  18. SouthernYank

    Spring/summer arriving in the northern hemisphere will take care of much of the virus. I would be shocked if most of the country isn’t opened up fully by late April – there will be targeted lock downs limited to the hot zones. Even the hot zones will be opened up by June.

    The unknown is the return of colder weather. I can see football/basketball/hockey all starting and being shut down again in a second wave.

    Like

    • TN Dawg

      Or another virus.

      We should learn from this in advance of the next pandemic.

      We must create a world in which people never interact with other people. It’s the only way to ensure people never get sick and die.

      Like

      • 92 Grad

        Hell, the dang smartphones and internet are the solution, I can be in the same house as my son and daughter and not see them for over 24hrs.

        Like

        • TN Dawg

          I don’t think it’s safe for families to be together.

          We must create individual housing to stop the transmission.

          I’ve read some reports that it can be transmitted just by looking at someone who has it.

          Like

  19. Mayor

    Herbie has become Nostradamus.

    Like

  20. Coweta Dawg

    It is too early to tell if Herbie’s right, but for those suggesting this pandemic is nothing but the warmed-over flu might want to check out how Spain’s death toll from the virus filled up morgues to the point that they’re now using hockey rinks.
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/pascaledavies/2020/03/24/ice-rink-in-spain-becomes-makeshift-morgue-as-coronavirus-cases-surge/#bcbc8aa4d8b1

    Or that the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation out of the U. of Wash. see a U.S. death toll of 81,000 by July from the virus.
    https://www.newsweek.com/deaths-coronavirus-us-could-top-80000-july-analysis-finds-1494693

    This ain’t the flu.

    Liked by 2 people

  21. ATL Dawg

    This place is on fire with hot takes. Up next will be a comparison of COVID-19 to climate change and how we’re overreacting to both and letting health experts and scientists push us around.

    Like

  22. mddawg

    It’s probably too early to characterize any prediction as more than mere speculation. Maybe some experts (meaning medical experts, not football experts) could claim to be making an educated guess, but that’s about it. , But if you’re an AD or school president it’s your job to be contemplating and preparing for the worst-case scenario. Maybe, just maybe, they should listen to the advice of medical professionals and act accordingly when the time comes.

    Like

  23. rchris

    It’s unthinkable that we wouldn’t play in 2020, but we’re going to have to start thinking it.

    Like

  24. Pedro

    Just the math. Increasing at 10% a day, 20% a day in some places in the u.s. 574000 cases worldwide through right now, a debated percentage die but let’s call it 2%. You can the make your own assumptions around that. Rosy scenarios are tough for me to see unless cases decelerate quickly and at a high rate.

    Like

    • Napoleon BonerFart

      Cases do decelerate. We’re in the early days of the epidemic, which is when the curve is exponentially increasing. But the curve levels off. Even the projections based on no remediation measures level off. So infections will double every few days for several weeks. And then the curve will flatten.

      We’re just trying to flatten the curve earlier than it would normally flatten without distancing and isolation, etc.

      Like

  25. Everyone is gonna get it at some point. Even now I see way to many people doing way too many things wrong (of course, bay county ain’t the hotbed of braniacs). Its just a matter of when we accept the risk and get moving on. I need work desperately bad now. At some point I’d risk death over foreclosure.

    Like

    • At some point I’d risk death over foreclosure.

      Why do we have to accept that as the binary choice? (no snark intended)

      Like

      • Well loans gotta be paid. I’m unhappily working on a getting a health care position again ( which will put me closer to the virus) so I can work through this time. we got no support, relief, aid for hurricane Michael other than some female trailers, and my rainy day fund was already blown up a year ago because of Michael.

        When a person, and I’m one of them, and there’s a lot of us, don’t make a lot of money it’s hard to build-up reserve funds.

        As I understand the stimulus package it’s gonna help me but it’s not gonna be enough. I’d be happy for my lender to roll back 3 months of mortgage to the back of my loan but they haven’t provided that opportunity yet. I doubt they will.

        So yea, I’m ready to work on anything I can get going. I expect to be sick at some point. My SO just got furloughed, no guarantee shell get asked back ( This is a chance for businesses and companies to restructure and/or get rid of people maybe they didn’t want any way), She has an elderly mother and a daughter and a renter, we’ve already made plans if one of us gets sick to try to keep it isolated, itll kill her mom. It’s going and is tough with both of us out of work and family to take care of, and our incomes were in the “low” bracket. Its tough.

        Like

  26. mp

    Spoke with a friend of mine yesterday. His brother is a ER doc out in rural Nebraska. They just had their first (known) case admitted. The patient is now on one of their 3 ventilators (and occupying one of their fee ICU rooms). Think how insignificantly things have to change to overwhelm that one hospital. Our health system is not built to handle pandemics.

    Like

  27. Got Cowdog

    Go home. Stay home for 14 days. No shit, for 14 days do not leave the confines of your address. Work from home if you are allowed. But on moral turpitude based on current events and recommendations, stay at your abode for 14 days.
    Call it the 14 day challenge.
    This is all horse shit. Stay home for 14 days and prove me wrong.

    Like

    • 92 Grad

      I sure wish people would do this. I myself dont have the option because our business is critical to hospital operations, so we have up to 6 men on the roads each week. At least my immediate family has the ability to stay home. St. Mary’s in Athens is getting a new CT Monday morning, that’s where I will be.

      Like