In praise of Ron Courson

Like everyone else, I have no idea how this reopening is going to play out, but at least I believe Georgia is going to have a more coherent plan than other programs.

Georgia football players and all athletes returning to campus on June 8 will be tested for COVID-19.

That’s going a step above what was required by the SEC in its decision Friday to allow those student-athletes back on school campuses for training. The league mandated only a three-stage screening process and requires testing only for “symptomatic” athletes.

But UGA Sports Medicine Director Ron Courson, who detailed his plans in a release sent out by the school late Friday afternoon, said testing would be done up front for all of Georgia’s athletes, which includes 87 scholarship football players and another 30 men’s and women’s basketball players.

“We will conduct COVID testing and perform medical evaluations on all student-athletes and they must be medically cleared prior to any physical activity,” Courson said. “We will identify any student-athletes and staff who may be more vulnerable due to existing health conditions and ensure that we have an individualized plan of care for their safe return to sport or work based upon medical guidance.”

Good on Ron.  Of course, that does nothing for any program that decides the SEC guidelines are sufficient.  Which would be no big deal from my selfish standpoint, except Georgia plays football against other SEC teams.

Sure hope Wolken is wrong about that, but I have this nagging feeling he may not be.

97 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, The Body Is A Temple

97 responses to “In praise of Ron Courson

  1. Gurkha Dawg

    It’s fine testing players now. Just don’t test anybody for the 2 weeks before the Alabama game! We can’t have half the team test positive and be unable to play.

    Like

  2. 81Dog

    It’s hard for me to believe other schools won’t do what we are doing, if they believe derailing the season would be a disaster. Making sure your own players don’t take your whole program down would seem like step 1 in preserving the season. Testing everyone up front is a good way to get a baseline of team health. Regardless of politics, and given the small number of people involved why wouldn’t you do this?

    Tests aren’t foolproof, but it seems preferable to guesswork

    Like

    • From Mandel:

      But then you see a comment like this one Thursday from Missouri AD Jim Sterk on the Paul Finebaum Show: “We’ve had advice that the best way to handle this is to do all those preventative measures” like masks, sterilization and temperature screening. “If there are symptoms, then you test. At this point in time, we’re not going to be testing everyone as they come in.” Sure enough, the SEC’s recommended protocols released on Friday specify testing only for “symptomatic team members.”

      Testing done right is expensive.

      Like

      • Nashville West

        Yeah it’s expensive, but you don’t put oil that you buy at the Dollar Store in a Ferrari. There is already a lot of money invested in these programs, why go cheap on something this crucial.
        I’d also like to think that it’s just the right thing to do, but I stopped being that idealistic about colleges and universities a long time ago.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Testing done right? Aren’t we doing it right already?

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        • If you think only testing players showing symptoms is doing it right, maybe you should tell Courson he doesn’t know what he’s doing.

          Like

          • Thought you meant the actual tests themselves weren’t right! I think all the players should be tested. Can’t the players get the same free tests everyone else in GA can get?

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      • ETDF

        How long until the “opportunity” to sponsor a COVID-19 test for the players?

        Like

        • Boy, now there’s a question. Somebody at B-M needs to get on the mother.

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          • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

            If they give me triple or quadruple the value in Hartman points, I’ll donate $2K right now. I’m not even joking. Then again, I wouldn’t be alone, so it won’t have the effect I would be hoping for as many others would get those extra points and probably be able to donate far more than me, so… frak.

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            • Jack Klompus

              You should have gone big. Like $10k. Who would have known when you didn’t? Lol

              Liked by 1 person

              • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

                I do my best not to lie or boast. The economic downturn has hurt, I can’t lie about that. I was patient and willing to allow things to continue along the original idea of “flattening the curve” to protect the healthcare system and the population. Now I’m ready for everyone to get back to business, as that goal was met long ago.

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  3. Spike

    Ron is not only the best in the business, but he is also a good man. He and his staff treated and took care of my son when he was injured there and needed surgery and rehab. They were always very caring and attentive to him and us, and were always available to talk and give us information, even though my wasn’t a big name “superstar” player while there. They treated him as if he was. One of his assistant trainers, David Jack, went above and beyond the call of duty. So, as you can tell, I’m a big fan and I admire him, and UGA is in good hands with Ron.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Cojones

      I’ll apologize early for the cognitive synapses and lack thereof, but about 15 yrs ago, an investigative show was looking into the sudden death, after practice, of a Forty-Niner. An autopsy found that his heart wall had been thickening through the years and his heart volume was being reduced as he aged.

      The investigative show (Nightline?) called every team in the NFL and asked if their meds included looking for this anomaly of the heart wall. No one did. And it was expensive as a side test to a really good physical exam already being given by all NFL teams. Next, they called all the NCAA teams that fielded a football team and asked if they gave such a test. No school did. Except one, they announced, then the next frame on the show had a bunch of red helmets with a black “G” on them held together in the middle by a bunch of Dawgs. Ron Courson became a national athletics team physician of renown at that moment. He had contracted with a med company to give ALL athletes at UGA that particular test at a cost of around $500/athlete.a year earlier.

      As a grad, it’s been nice to follow Ron Courson’s professional career in Sports Medicine as an adjunct to cheering for that team he keeps so well for us all. He indeed makes us all proud.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

    Senator, when you find yourself agreeing with Dan Wolken or thinking, “You know, Dan Wolken may have a point,” that is when you know you are wrong. 🤷🏻‍♂️

    All of these writers, him, Mandel, Schultz, Peter King, they’ve all irresponsibly spread fear porn in the face of data which tells us that outside of the people who actually are in danger from this thing, that it’s better for the rest of us to move on with our lives with caution and safety than continue to let ourselves be paralyzed with fear.

    Universities should be the safest places from covid-19 considering everyone will be tested before being allowed on campus, and then the testing being done throughout the school year. However, if there is a breakout of infection, these are the cohort people least likely to suffer fatalities.

    With exercising safety, caution, and common sense, we’ll be okay.

    Liked by 1 person

    • There are almost 100,000 dead and your last sentence is a hope, not a plan of action.

      (I’m not saying that to change your mind.)

      Like

      • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

        And that’s fine, but this number you quote is wrong. There are not almost 100K dead. The dead from Covid-19 is about 60K. The dead with Covid-19 is another 40K, and not nearly the same thing. Over 80K people have died from pneumonia in the same amount of time.

        I do say this to hopefully change your mind. This is what I spoke about. People who wish to sow fear do so by convincing you and others this is more deadly than it is. It is fatal for certain people, but for healthy people under the age of 60, the number of fatalities are statistically insignificant.

        It is not logical to fear a virus that has killed 20K less people than pneumonia.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Debby Balcer

          My mother died from lung cancer but it brought out other underlying conditions that caused her death. If she did not have lung cancer they would have not caused her death. Saying someone died with covid is ridiculous because if they did not have covid their other conditions would not have killed them. With your logic if I survive a car accident but die later due to injuries I received in the crash my cause of death was not due to the accident. Talk about grasping at straws to make the numbers look better.

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          • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

            And you are using fear to quantify what isn’t there as a way of projecting personal experience into situations where it likely does not apply.

            For example, give that the vast majority of deaths have been elderly with complications, meaning they had COPD or diabetes or cardiac issues, etc, and that the majority of those people were receiving hospice care, no, the Covid-19 did not cause their deaths.

            Then you also get into reporting. States like CA and MN wait for lab results to come back to report a death as Covid-19 caused. NY and WA don’t. Anyone who has Covid-19 at the time of death is listed as a Covid-19 death whether or not they actually died from Covid-19.

            I’m sorry for your mother, Debby, but your personal experience does nothing more than affect you. I can’t let it effect me.

            Liked by 1 person

            • mp

              I will give on that if you give on the fact of the most people who die from pneumonia also have underlying health conditions. Keep eliminating categories and soon we will get down to only car accidents, murders and suicides as killing anyone! Most of the people die in this country are old. Fun fact!

              I know three people under 50 who have had coronavirus. Two regained health. The third is dead (and had no underlying health conditions). That one’s death certificate did not list COVID-19 as the cause because they was not ample testing supplies at the time.

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              • Macallanlover

                Thanks for the info. There are so many issues involved, just no reliable, consistent data to base hard positions on. It is safe to say we do not know the exact number, and never will. The other key factor is each reporting jurisdiction has their own interpretation of how things get reported. What makes me suspicious that the number is almost certainly exaggerated is there is reported to be a bounty paid to counties/cities/hospitals for corona virus deaths, I don’t know the details but using the Senator’s method of analyzing, follow the money (and I would add, look first at NY and Cali).

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                • mp

                  Exactly right! Following the money leads me to Kelly Loeffler, Richard Burr, and friends of Trump taking advantage of discretionary funds! Fuck those guys!

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                • Macallanlover

                  Such a narrow little mind you have, likely caused by association with others who also cannot face reality. World is such a scary place for you snowflake leftists, and that is sad. Sad for what you miss, but more sad for a world that needs everyone pulling together, not being divisive. It might surprise you that misdeeds, corruption, and bold face lies (with indisputable video evidence) occurs across party lines. Perhaps, and this is radical thinking for a person like you, we should punish every one equally, regardless of their political positions. Your comment shows you clearly are not into that.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • mp

                  LOL. You hypocrite. You’re the one who chose to solely cast aspersions solely at New York and California and not the ones currently in power in Washington. What a snowflake you are, so easy to get your goat. Both parties have little regard for the lives of the people who support them.

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                • Gurkha Dawg

                  I know for a fact the there is increased reimbursement for the hospital. The number I heard was $13,000 for each covid + patient admitted. That number is second hand so I don’t know if it is accurate. But hospitals have incurred tremendous expense converting floors to covid units, so it makes sense. There is incentive to classify as many patients as possible as covid +.

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                • Macallanlover

                  That is what I heard was paid to hospital by government for each covid death, much higher if they were on a ventilator. Charges should be based on actual cost of services provided, days/hours, and materials involved, not the specific disease. I do recognize the additional costs required by the ventilators, isolation demands, and cleaning efforts; these should certainly be added. But putting a “bonus” on classification just encourages corruption, at a time where we need accurate data.

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                • Cojones

                  Have you looked at the WHO mortality reports of past years? They keep track of all illnesses and causes of death everywhere on earth. Everyone seems to have taken their math at heart for years (for me, going back to the 60s and 70s), but all of a sudden the numbers are inconvenient to classify if death is by Covid-19.

                  Look at WHO’s listed cause of death for all diseases in all states and let me know what seems to jump out at you…hell, I’ll help you. The number of deaths to any particular disease recorded for years has taken an unexplained leap in those categories when separated from those deaths attributed to this virus. We suddenly have more heart attacks, pneumonia and other diseases occurring in ALL states and countries for the first time in years after they had registered a comparable average of those diseases for several years. Would you like to explain that fact that is the antithesis of what you claim is an overcount? Truth is, there is an undercount. The true number of these seemingly extra cases of death signals that we have a jump of 20% above what is being recorded as Covid-19.

                  Now that we know that the heart is affected by this virus, as well as the occurrence of adventitious pneumonia, the true number of Covid-19 deaths is over 120,000 and counting faster than you can add.

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          • Jack Klompus

            It’s all relative. If you died in a car wreck and bad Covid then the car wreck caused it.

            I’m okay with separating them but they show both totals so you can still see the impact. And no I don’t believe this is a liberal agenda to scare us.

            This is a pandemic and the countries with no cases are the ones that are going to the most extreme to protect people or stop the spread. Testing, quarantine, tracing. The ones that are upset about wearing a mask and bickering about how cases are reported, not so much.

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        • Huntindawg

          “The dead from Covid-19 is about 60K. The dead with Covid-19 is another 40K, and not nearly the same thing.”

          I’m completely lost on this quote. What does this mean? Not being sarcastic at all, I just don’t understand it.

          I really don’t know what to believe about Covid. Everywhere you look there are different statistics and changing statistics. The only thing I know for sure is my own personal experience, which is that I am aware of exactly 1 person within 2 degrees of separation that actually had it, was very sick and hospitalized, and then recovered.

          It does seem that a fairly accepted fact is that college football players are at very low risk for any significant health risk. Additionally, almost everything I read says that people in that age group are likely to be asymptomatic. Should we prevent healthy, asymptomatic carriers from playing if it is extremely unlikely they will be a health risk to other players on the field?

          Should the economic impact of cancelling the season be ignored? Is it unreasonable for AD’s and conference commissioners from taking that into account? I’m going to work everyday and never stopped because of the financial implications both to myself and others, the same as a huge number of people. Was that insensitive to a significant risk, or reasonable in light of the known data? Heck if I know.

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          • hu

            Edit: Ok I see what you are saying with that quote. You’re referencing co-morbidity. The question is whether Covid contributed to those deaths. If you have lung cancer and catch pneumonia, and that combination kills you, then pneumonia was a cause. If you have lung cancer and stub your toe and subsequently die, it’s doubtful the toe was a cause.

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          • Huntindawg

            Edit: Ok I see what you are saying with that quote. You’re referencing co-morbidity. The question is whether Covid contributed to those deaths. If you have lung cancer and catch pneumonia, and that combination kills you, then pneumonia was a cause. If you have lung cancer and stub your toe and subsequently die, it’s doubtful the toe was a cause.

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            • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

              The answer is likely somewhere in the middle. Interestingly, that would put it almost even with deaths caused by pneumonia this year. Think of it. We have shut down our entire way of life for a virus with a fatality rate the same as pneumonia.*

              That’s oversimplified. For healthy people under 60, the fatality rate for covid-19 is far less than pneumonia or the flu. About 5 times less deadly. For people over 60 who also have other complications, the fatality rate is somewhere between 10-15 times more fatal than the flu or pneumonia. This is horrifying, but it gives us usable information as to who needs protection and who needs precaution.

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              • HirsuteDawg

                Do you even know how the US counts pneumonia deaths each year? (hint: it is not by verifying a positive pneumonia test with each death.) After you look it up, if you don’t change you mind about COVID deaths vs pneumonia deaths, I’ll know that you are not able to digest and interpret simple facts.

                Liked by 1 person

              • Classic City Canine

                I think your numbers are bulls— but for the sake of argument I’ll run with them. Has it even occurred to you that we got as many deaths as pneumonia in less time and with a huge lockdown of the economy. Without the restrictions this would have been exponentially worse.

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                • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

                  As would the deaths from pneumonia.

                  See how that works? If you can’t see how that would work, you’re just a big ole idiot.

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          • Gaskilldawg

            I disagree that if is a “fairly accepted fact that college football players are at a very low risk for any significant health risk.” I agree that such is a “fairly accepted” assumption but COVID-19 is so new that no medical research has established as a “fact” that a healthy 21 year old who contracts it and does not die is free from long term effect on the lungs or heart.
            That may even be a hypothesis that some have, but there haven’t been enough subjects who recovered over two years ago to evaluate the existence or absence of residual health issues.
            I hope your assumption eventually is proven to be a fact, I really do.

            Liked by 1 person

    • With exercising safety, caution, and common sense, we’ll be okay.

      Good to know.

      Like

  5. Down Island Way

    Stand aside….All hail Ron Courson the great, king of healing those who require such attention….

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    • spur21

      I have no idea what Ron is paid but surely he deserves more.

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      • Gaskilldawg

        Courson made $281,485.97 in the year ending June 30, 2019. There are folks in the UGA AA making a lot more who aren’t worth nearly what Courson is worth.

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      • When I was at the end of my running career I went to him for some foot and ankle problems. He said “do you think maybe you are done with this part of your life”? He was right, giving up running wasn’t as bad as giving up hoops but this not being able to swim really sucks. They have opened the Y back up to lap swims but I just don’t know if I want to go through that locker room.

        Like

        • ETDF

          My local Y has re-opened. Locker rooms are not accessible, pool deck only. Also, they only allow 1 person per lane so you have to reserve a lane. You get it for 50 min. But, it beats not swimming at all.

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    • Russ

      I heartily agree with this. We have one of the best in the business and he’s a DGD!

      Like

  6. Bright Idea

    Faith, hope, planning, logic and luck has been used in combination forever. Suddenly we’re supposed to trust none of them?

    Like

  7. Ozam

    Death is a sad thing. Everybody hates death. No one wants to talk about death. But, on average 55,000 people die EVERY WEEK of an average year in the United States. I think part of the hysteria is that for the general public the death numbers being tossed around sound huge. Unfortunately they are not.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Gurkha Dawg

      Your post made me think of Sharknado. “I know you’re scared, sharks are scary.” (Quote might not be exactly right)

      Like

    • William Safire's Ghost

      Oh sure, more people dead in 3 months than died in Vietnam total, but people die all the time.
      Let’s just build a statue of Mammon in DC to solidify that we really only worship money in this country and own it instead of dancing around claiming to be a pro-life Christian nation then.

      Like

      • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

        Wow, William. I lost count the number of strawman arguments you just created with this ridiculous stupid post. Congratulations.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Cojones

          Whereas, you make no argument at all.

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          • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

            I have. Many times in multiple places. I’m not going to respond to strawman arguments, Cojones. Like the one you just made. We get it. You and people like you want the economy to be crippled to get rid of Trump in November. While I don’t particularly care for the president, I’m not willing to destroy the country to save it. And the thing is, once more people realize this is the end goal of people like you, you’re literally going to ensure his reelection.

            Stay inside if you want. The rest of us will be okay.

            Liked by 1 person

  8. spur21

    Victor Davis Hanson made a very good point
    “Just three states: Massachusetts, New York, and New Jersey account for about 55% of all the deaths and, yet, they only have about 11% of the population,” he continued. “But California and Texas and Florida, they have about 30% of all the people in the United States and they’ve had about 5,500 deaths, so they are just radically different situations. This one-size-fits-all doesn’t work.”

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    • mp

      Fair enough, but it was only stemmed from becoming a bigger problem elsewhere because Vinny from the Bronx was not able to go down to the Final Four in Atlanta or the Masters and thus make it Georgia’s problem too.

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      • Russ

        Yep. Everyone talking about how that this is no big deal fail to account for the most stringent restrictions we have ever seen as a huge part of the mitigation. Over 90k deaths and still climbing (I’ll take the widely accepted number from multiple national/international sources). This could have been much worse, and it still can be, but we bought a lot of time and resources to deal with it.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

          There aren’t many people with voices in decision making who claim this is no big deal. Even though others have tried to put words in my mouth and others mouths here, neither have we who have been saying for 6 weeks that it’s not as bad as the fear-mongers believe and it’s time to open our society with caution and safety.

          What people like you do keep doing however, is keep moving the goal posts. Remember when all this was about flattening the curve? Well the curve was pretty well flattened in most areas outside the northeast almost two months ago. Then it was less infections week over week. Then it was WAIT FOR A VACCINE!!!

          What’s it going to be next? Where will the goalposts be moved to next?

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          • I really get tired of the moving goalposts BS.

            Nobody is saying wait for a vaccine to open and the reason the curve has flattened is because of the very social distancing/shelter in place rules that are now being relaxed. Those rules were in place precisely because there is no cure.

            As far as the less infections week over week goes, that’s part of the WH guidelines and as far as I know, there isn’t a state in the country relaxing its rules that’s in compliance.

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            • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

              Except the moving the goalposts thing is real, and the White House, with Trump and Fauci and the rest, have been as complicit as anyone in this. The governors of Georgia, Florida, and Texas have been proven right, and I’ve yet to see a single apology or admittance of being from the likes of Mandel or Wolken or Peter King or anyone in the media or WaPo or NYT or CNN. Or Amanda Mull for that matter, who should be ashamed of what she wrote but obviously isn’t. Memories are long.

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              • mp

                Claiming anyone is right at this point is spiking the ball on the 30 yard line. There’s a ridiculously long way to go. DeSantis was right about elder care facilities, but the rest of it is purely speculative at this point.

                Like

                • Especially when those states are all manipulating the data.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

                  Yep. Manipulating their data. Like New York or Washington labeling everyone who died while infected with covid-19 as a covid-19 death without waiting for lab confirmation like other states such as California do. You mean like that?

                  Certain people will never admit they were wrong. Like Mandel. Or Wolken. Or Mull. Or anyone at CNN. And especially not Peter King who has been among the biggest fear-mongers anywhere. Seriously, that guy is completely unhinged. They’ll just move on to the next piece of data THEY can manipulate to sow fear and discord. And it’s getting to a point where we have to wonder why? Why are these people continuing to go against the available data? Georgia, Florida, and Texas are good to go. People aren’t dying in the streets. Hospitals aren’t overwhelmed. The predictions in the media were that would happen by about May 15th in Georgia. Well, May 15th came and went and nope. May 22nd has come and gone and still nope. So why?

                  A cynical person would have to believe it’s because all of these people, who hate Trump more than they love their own lives and financial well-being, would love the lockdowns to continue and the economy to go under so they can use it to beat Trump in November. As someone who didn’t vote for Trump (or Hillary) and won’t vote for Trump (or Biden) in November, it’s just about the only conclusion I can make at this point. It’s literally what Bill Maher said last year. The only thing that could beat Trump is an economic crisis. These people who hate Donald Trump are trying to will an artificially created economic crisis into being because they truly believe it’s for the good of the country. They have to kill the country to save the country.

                  Change my mind.

                  Like

                • I’ve already commented in this thread I have no interest in changing your mind.

                  Like

          • Russ

            Uh, no. Texas reopened 2 weeks ago and we now lead the US in new cases and have increased for the past 3 weeks. We’re number 1!

            I’m not moving the goal posts. We do have to reopen. However, reopening by misstating the numbers and portraying it as flat when it’s not is just wrong, and could lead to a worse fall than spring, making all the pain of spring for naught.

            Liked by 1 person

  9. FlyingPeakDawg

    Over / Under on first report of gator player spitting on opponents in the pile?

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Sam Johnson

    I have a bad feeling about this. I wondering what medical experts have been consulted about this decision because none are cited or referenced. I’m humble enough to know that no matter how much I read about this virus, there is still much uncertainty and the trained scientists have a better grasp of the data and risks than I do. What I do see are that there are several possible and foreseeable negative outcomes, including community outbreaks, hospitalisations and even deaths. If these happen, will our AD and Pres be held accountable?

    Like

    • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

      I get why you would think that if all you do is watch cable news, but the data doesn’t support your bad feeling.

      Like

      • Classic City Canine

        You have proven by your previous comments that you don’t have a damn clue about data, so maybe hold your horses on the critique.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

          Yeah, except that’s not true. But it’s okay you believe that. It’s your right to be wrong.

          Like

  11. DawgByte

    Beware of the CCP Virus Boogieman, he’s gonna getchya!

    In the society we live in, you’re damned if you do and damned if you don’t. There will always be arsehats like Dan Woken to be around to play Monday morning QB and excoriate anyone who’s placed in a position to make difficult decisions.

    Chew on some of these numbers:

    In Forysth Co. we have a population of 252,536. We have 444 confirmed cases and 12 deaths. The majority of deaths coming to the elderly and complicated by pre-existing conditions.

    We have ~335,000,000 Americans, as of today 1,604,189 have contracted the CCP Virus and 96,082 have died. Given what we know about inaccurate mortality rates, one can assume those numbers are high.

    When you compare the CCP Virus numbers to the Spanish Flu I think honest scientists and historian will look back and say the WORLD (not just the U.S.) overreacted to this situation. Was it worth destroying the world economy over this pandemic? Did the world react the same way to H1N1? NO.

    So yeah, Andrew Reilly is a SNOWFLAKE and can kiss my arse.

    Liked by 3 people

  12. Rocketdawg

    Wolken is “chicken little sky is falling” all the time about everything. His bullshit is so old and predictable.

    There will no doubt be bumps in the road and I have faith in the UGA Sports medicine staff to make sure all of our athletes and coaches are as safe as possible.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

      Barrett Sallee just handed Wolken his ass.

      It was quite satisfying.

      Like

  13. ApalachDawg aux Bruxelles

    I can see it, we pull players that test positive… and bama and florida will not

    Like

  14. BuffaloSpringfield

    I thought this was about Ron Courson…. DGD. Some of ya’ll need to be in quarantine with Gilligan and The Captain.

    Like

  15. Debby Balcer

    It is a weak argument when you assume that people are reacting to the virus to insure Trump does not get re-elected. This is a world wide epidemic and he has had the opportunity to lead his country in a way that assured his re-election but he chose not to take the opportunity to lead in a way leaders from both parties have in past crises. I voted libertarian last election. I have never voted for a Democrat for President. I am not scared. I have a family member who is a chef at a university for their catering events. He will not be working until August at the earliest because colleges are online and catering events canceling. I have an 87 year old mother in law that is at risk. This is a complex issue and people who try to distill it down to the election are looking at this through the wrong lens.

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    • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

      And yet, it is happening. It is completely logical if you understand the train of thought of the people who hate Trump the most. Ask yourself why certain people, the people in the “Resistance,” are most invested in keeping the lockdown going? In the face of all available data? In the face of Sweden. In the face of Liberty being open the entire spring semester and not having one student or faculty member die. We as a people are completely capable of safely, cautiously going about our lives in a modified way. It’s been proven for over month now in Texas, Florida, and Georgia. And yet, the people fighting against all this truth the most are the ones who hate Trump the most.

      Bill Maher said it last year. He outlined exactly what was needed for Trump to lose in 2020: an economic collapse. There wasn’t a huge uproar from anyone but Trump supporters and Fox News. Why? Because the people who think like him agree with him. These people are willing to destroy our economy to “save” the country as they see it. The most unhinged coronabros on social media are all in the media, including sports writers who all hate Trump. Check out Wolken or Mike Silver or Peter King’s timelines. It’s frightening.

      They are intentionally sowing fear to make people like you afraid. The data doesn’t fit their narrative, so they ignore the data. Georgia’s successful reopening, as well as Florida and Texas doing the same, should be the three biggest stories in the news. Why is it getting almost no coverage? Why is the media lying about the success? Why hasn’t Cuomo answered a single question from the media about being the cause for almost all the death in New York? It doesn’t fit the narrative, and the narrative is meant to cause economic chaos to defeat Trump.

      Even with believing this, knowing this, I’m still not going to vote for Trump because I generally hate politics in all its forms, but if you don’t think the Far Left which now controls the Democrats aren’t playing this as their end game, you’re not paying attention.

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  16. Debby Balcer

    Have you actually read what is happening in Sweden? Their plan did not work. You may not be voting for Trump but you can tell you are getting your news from Fox and the far right media.

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    • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

      Now I know you know nothing. And if you think I got my news from Fox, you’re completely in the thrall of our terribly biased media. It’s amazing that anyone who doesn’t buy into the CNN and NYT and WaPo b.s. is immediately labeled as a Fox watcher.

      Sweden is almost at full herd immunity and has been a success. You, who only watches our b.s. media wouldn’t know that.

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    • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

      You’re not looking at the right numbers, and neither is this report. You and this report are looking at only the death numbers, and while unfortunate, the numbers that actually matter are the infected and antibody numbers. That is what building herd immunity is.

      This news is being filtered through a lens by those with an agenda to make it seem like Sweden’s strategy isn’t working, when it is actually working 100% as they expected. That is why in the last few days we’ve gotten these bullshit reports, because they know Sweden’s strategy has worked to build herd immunity. Sweden was willing to make the hard choice, and have had some death. They knew this was going to happen. It was built into their strategy.

      As I said, the news you view is filtered through your preferred lens, and that lens is from a Leftist point of view. That’s fine, but know that you remain woefully uninformed.

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  17. Debby Balcer

    Glad to know deaths don’t matter to you. I was not looking for a leftist view in fact I doubt a magazine called marketwatch is leftish. I googled because I have seen several news stories and article from different sources saying oops. Herd immunity might not even work for covid. It assumes having the disease gives you immunity and you don’t get it again. Corona type viruses mutate which makes immunity to them hard to achieve. I am not a leftist. I am not scared. I am an educated person who believes the world does not revolve around who our president is.

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    • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

      That’s a strawman argument. It doesn’t address the truth of the issue. All you people try to do by saying garbage like, “You don’t care about people dying,” or “Deaths don’t matter to you,” is shut down an actual logical argument against your emotional fearfulness. It’s literally your handbook. When you can’t win in the forum of ideas, you label those who disagree with you as racist, misogynist, Far Right, bigot, homophobe, Fox News watcher, MAGA… whatever. I don’t care, so it doesn’t work against me. Strawman arguments and ad hominem attacks are literally everything your arguments always boil down to, especially now, because you cannot defend your narrative against the data.

      Sweden knew what it was doing. They took it upon themselves. The deaths they’ve suffered will allow their entire population to have herd immunity. That was the point. You may disagree with the choice, as do I, but reframing it as “unforeseen” or a “failure” is a lie. It is a hard-won success.

      As to the rest, today is the lowest number of covid-19 deaths yet, under 700 across the entire country. I suggest you go out and enjoy your holiday weekend. Or stay inside and do nothing. The choice is yours.

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        • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

          And again, that is others defining what success looks like to them as opposed to the decision Sweden made. I don’t think they made the right decision, but the choice they made is the choice they made. This is what I’m talking about re: our media. They’re little interested in context and all the data as opposed to narrow bits of data to create and support their preferred narrative.

          To whit: Why isn’t Georgia, Florida, and Texas’s success the biggest news story in the country right now? Why hasn’t Amanda Mull issued a retraction and apology? She’s not the only one, but her hit piece on Kemp was disgusting, unwarranted, and anti-data. And not the work I would expect from a Grady graduate.

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          • Like

            • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

              Washington Monthly. Senator? Are you that desperate to make a point. It always amazes me the same people who shoot down Fox News as a viable news source always come with some crazy leftist sources of their own.

              You’re also not arguing against my point. I have said, more than twice now, that I think this was a bad idea by Sweden, however, it is the choice they made. By going for herd immunity OF COURSE they are going to have more death, especially in the first couple of months. Why are you and these “journalists” acting like this is a surprise? It’s like reporting, “SURPRISE – water is wet!” This isn’t news. It’s common sense.

              I did also notice that you’ve gloamed onto this one point to try to “gotcha” me when we both seem to be agreeing that Sweden made a mistake, and have ignored my other my other point that the success Georgia, Florida, and Texas are having should be the biggest news story in the country but has been completely ignored by the majority of our “journalists.” That’s your prerogative, of course.

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              • Sweden knew what it was doing. They took it upon themselves. The deaths they’ve suffered will allow their entire population to have herd immunity. That was the point. You may disagree with the choice, as do I, but reframing it as “unforeseen” or a “failure” is a lie. It is a hard-won success.

                You, my friend, are trying to have it both ways here.

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                • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

                  That’s the choice they made. They invited more death now hoping for less death later. This thing is highly likely to swing back around in the winter. It could not, but it likely will. When it does, if Sweden reaches herd immunity, they are unlikely to be affected while the rest of us are locked down again.

                  It’s the Invasion of Japan vs. dropping the atomic bomb argument. It’s a rock and a hard place. We chose less death now hoping to give more time to get a vaccine ready so that when the virus comes back around in the winter we maybe have a way to fight it. If we don’t, we shut down again. Even with that, I agree with our strategy. However, I’m also not willing to Monday Morning QB Sweden’s strategy. It’s the choice they made. It was always going to look bad. There was always going to be more death. That people reporting this as if it’s some big surprise is bullshit, and you know that. We won’t know if they’ve failed or not until later. Them having more death now certainly doesn’t make it a failure. It was expected!

                  Journalists acting like this is some kind of surprise or big news is manufacturing news instead of reporting. It’s dishonest. And, the timing of all these stories hitting at all the same time stinks of the kind of coordination that tells you this is bullshit. All these stories use the same language, the turns of phrase. It’s almost like they’re using the same playbook.

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                • That’s the choice they made. They invited more death now hoping for less death later. This thing is highly likely to swing back around in the winter. It could not, but it likely will. When it does, if Sweden reaches herd immunity, they are unlikely to be affected while the rest of us are locked down again.

                  So is it a hard won success now, or not?

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                • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

                  By definition, having more expected death now would make it hard won, wouldn’t it? I’m confused. Your problem isn’t with what I said, but how I said it? I didn’t intend for the turn of phrase to be insensitive, but if that’s how it came across, well, that’s how it came across.

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                • I’m talking about timing. You were using the present tense to describe the situation in Sweden, but now that I’m parsing your words, you seem to orient towards a possible future success.

                  The data shows that there is no herd immunity in any numbers there. Nothing has been hard won. That you insist otherwise leads me to doubt any of your analysis on the subject.

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                • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

                  Oh, okay! I see that. That’s 100% my mistake then.

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                • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

                  No, I don’t. Changing the tense doesn’t change the argument. She repeated what these journalists have said, that it’s not working like they thought using the fact that they have more death per capita than anywhere in Europe as proof of this, however, they were always expected to have more death per capita. It was literally their strategy. I made a mistake in tense, but saying this is a failed strategy by stating what everyone knew was going to happen as proof of failure is also not an actual argument. It’s a narrative.

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                • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

                  To use a phrase a know you know: Res ipsa loquitur.

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