Ready for ‘rona

I’m sure most of you are watching the pandemic numbers as carefully as I am.  They’ve been a mixed bag of late.  The trend in states where restrictions have been relaxed are troubling and I don’t expect the protests to help much.

What does that mean for college football?  Honestly, we don’t know yet, but I’ll just put this out there for your consumption:

We spoke to the following four public health experts, asking them to assess the risk various activities pose to spreading coronavirus.

  • Dr. Matthew Sims, Beaumont Health director of infectious disease research
  • Dr. Dennis Cunningham, McLaren Health Care medical director for infection prevention
  • Dr. Mimi Emig, retired infectious disease specialist with Spectrum Health
  • Dr. Nasir Husain, Henry Ford Macomb medical director for infection prevention

The doctors pointed to five factors, when considering how risky a given activity might be: Whether it’s inside or outside; proximity to others; exposure time; likelihood of compliance; and personal risk level.

Outdoor activities are generally safer, they said, because the virus becomes less concentrated outside and doesn’t get recirculated around like it could indoors.

Activities that prevent social distancing – like playing basketball or packing in at a music concert – are also riskier.

The experts also point to exposure time as a factor.

They graded various settings on a 1-10 scale, with 10 being the riskiest.  Here’s what they said about you know what:

Sports stadiums

Risk level: 8

Just like concerts, sports stadiums have crowding and alcohol. People are also likely to cheer, yell and sing, among other noises, which also makes the spread easier.

The only places riskier are bars.  Alcohol, for the win… fortunately, nobody drinks at a tailgate.

There is this, for consolation.

The doctors emphasized that if everybody takes precautions, the risk level for each activity is dramatically reduced, they said.

I’m sure everyone will wear their masks for four hours straight in the September sun.  No worries!

(h/t)

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UPDATE:  I don’t know why some of you are so insistent about arguing with me about this, but just to reiterate, all I’ve said from the beginning is that we don’t know enough about COVID-19 to draw major conclusions about what is safe and what is not, which means those making public policy decisions should be cautious about the consequences.

I am not someone who makes public policy decisions, in case you didn’t realize that.  Therefore, trying to convince me that we can be less cautious is a waste of bandwidth.

Instead of delivering your keen expertise my way, perhaps you should send Morehead and McGarity your wisdom, so that they can do away with their planning for the season.

Right now, UGA is looking at three options regarding fan attendance.

Option I: In this scenario, patrons will not be allowed to be in attendance at any of our athletic events. Events would take place with only essential staffing (game officials, management, etc.).

Option II: In this scenario, there will be limited attendance with mandatory social distancing. Our policies would align with state guidelines for live performance venues. We have designated seating throughout all our athletic facilities to mandate where patrons can sit while still maintaining their 6’ distance. We will install decals on flooring to ensure 6’ spacing in all lines (ingress, concessions, restrooms, etc.). We will also attempt to eliminate potential congregation elements such as misting tents and water refill stations. We will move to cashless operations in all areas while additionally removing touchpoints where possible (parking, ticketing, concessions, etc.). Our concession workers will be mandated to wear gloves and masks.

Option III: In this scenario, social distancing practices are relaxed and there are no restrictions on attendance. This eliminates the need for reduced seating configurations and maintaining social distancing in all lines. Our focus will shift to other best practices for mitigation. We will eliminate potential congregation elements. We will still move to cashless operations and reducing touchpoints where possible.

GATA!

57 Comments

Filed under College Football, The Body Is A Temple

57 responses to “Ready for ‘rona

  1. Charles A

    The Joker remains what bucket do you fall in that it could potentially put you in a hospital or kill you. So if going to a football game is an 8, what does that mean to healthy 30 year old vs a 70 year old diabetic? Just looking at the numbers, I’d think the diabetic should consider sitting this season out, barring some vaccine or new information, but the healthy thirty year old probably doesn’t have much to worry about even if he does pick it up. So there’s the risk inside the risk that has to be addressed. The numbers for the the healthy under 40 crowd haven’t warranted shutting down the country so the students are probably OK but putting the older long time UGA season ticket holders in the stadium could be another thing altogether.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. DawgByte

    When one analyzes the infection and mortality numbers in comparison to overall population and the demographics of those most harshly impacted by this virus and put it into the historical context of other pandemics (ex. Spanish Flu, pandemics of 1958, 1969 and 2009), there’s only one objective conclusion.

    This is the greatest global overreaction in world history… period, end of discussion.

    What drove this overreaction? The news media, social media and political weaponization, by fear mongering and spreading misinformation. Oh and to be fair and balanced, the President’s press briefings were a circus.

    Liked by 2 people

    • The lesson from the Spanish Flu is the exact opposite of what you’re arguing.

      Liked by 1 person

      • DawgByte

        Incorrect my friend. Even in the case of the Spanish Flu, by orders of magnitude the most deadly pandemic since the Middle Ages, the world did not lock down their economies. There was no justifiable reason for the lock down in 2020. We know how to stop the spread and contain from pandemic playbooks that were written decades ago, including one prepared by the GWB Administration. By following simple hygienic guidelines and putting the most vulnerable in quarantine, the virus can be checked. The Japanese model results are in and there are plenty of other examples that support their approach. We didn’t need to go into economic collapse, because as we’ll find out shortly, that the cure was worse than the disease.

        BTW, how’s the social distancing working out for protesters??? LOL, what a bunch of hypocrites!

        Liked by 1 person

        • The 1918 influenza pandemic was the most severe pandemic in recent history. It was caused by an H1N1 virus with genes of avian origin. Although there is not universal consensus regarding where the virus originated, it spread worldwide during 1918-1919. In the United States, it was first identified in military personnel in spring 1918. It is estimated that about 500 million people or one-third of the world’s population became infected with this virus. The number of deaths was estimated to be at least 50 million worldwide with about 675,000 occurring in the United States.

          From history.com:

          “Spanish flu” has been used to describe the flu pandemic of 1918 and 1919 and the name suggests the outbreak started in Spain. But the term is actually a misnomer and points to a key fact: nations involved in World War I didn’t accurately report their flu outbreaks…

          “The viruses don’t care where they come from, they just love taking advantage of wartime censorship,” says Carol R. Byerly, author of Fever of War: The Influenza Epidemic in the U.S. Army during World War I. “Censorship is very dangerous during a pandemic.”

          Liked by 1 person

        • mddawg

          People keep pointing to protesters and saying “what about social distancing?”, but all of the protesters I’ve seen (admittedly I’ve only seen them on TV or in pictures) are wearing face masks, which is exactly what’s been recommended when you can’t maintain social distancing. So what’s to criticize there? Yes, I understand that social distancing is the preferred method of stopping the spread over face masks. But I’d bet that some of those same people who are lobbing those criticisms at the protesters are the ones who wanted lockdown to end just so they could get a haircut. So it’s okay to break quarantine to get a haircut but not to protest police brutality? Seems like there’s plenty of hypocrisy to go around.

          Hopefully I haven’t veered too far into Playpen territory, and this isn’t meant as an attack on you Dawgbyte, but rather on your comment re: hypocrisy. If I’ve crossed a line, I’m sure the Senator will let me know.

          Liked by 1 person

        • ASEF

          Spanish Flu: Some cities did lock down, leading to much faster economic recoveries. Some didn’t and faced much higher death tolls.

          And: Medicine and technology in general have made a few advances in the last 100 years. Just a couple.

          Like

        • MagnusDawgus

          Check out how St. Louis fared vs. Philadephia during the Spanish Flu, and tell me what they did differently.

          Like

          • Russ

            Don’t cloud the issue with facts. “Only” 110k have died in the US in three months (and 408k worldwide) despite the most draconian restrictions any of us have seen. I wonder how many deaths it would have been without “the greatest global overreaction”?

            And I’d just like to give a shout out to Bill Gates, Anthony Fauci and the Illuminati for convincing the entire world including such progressive bastions as Russia and China to “overreact” to this hoax. It took a global hoax to get the entire world to respond in unison.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Napoleon BonerFart

              Why, I had to step over bodies stacked like cord wood just to get to my office today. And why? Because somebody wanted a haircut.
              #StayHomeStayPoor
              #IfItSavesEvenOneLife

              Like

  3. practicaldawg

    The problem is that the experts still know as little as ever about the disease. They’re seeing upticks in cases in some places but not others — notably GA, which has been open for over a month. They have no idea why. The media wants desperately to link it to reopenings, but the inconsistencies have them flummoxed.

    The other problem is that the cases continue to be reported with zero context. Who is still getting it? What age are they? Etc. How can we make those people safer? It clearly affects the population in dramatically different ways and the death toll is clearly skewed to older, sicker individuals. How can we make them safer without continuing these ham fisted “all or nothing” policies for the entire population?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Exactly.

      And the people running college sports have even less insight about this than the experts.

      Like

      • Napoleon BonerFart

        Given that the experts are right or wrong at random and that lock downs have no correlation with COVID cases, why meekly accept a mandatory shutdown of the economy that is guaranteed to hurt millions in the spirit of doing something and hoping it works?

        Like

    • 92 Grad

      Yeah, the only conclusion I have is that there is no way to stop spreading it. It is just a fact of life right now. All I can do is stay clean and far away from my parents.

      Like

  4. JG Shellnutt

    This is an interesting article I saw the other day. NY Times surveyed 500 epidemiologists and infectious disease specialists asking their personal anticipated timeframes to get back to regular activities of life. Pretty interesting read.

    Like

  5. I’ll wear my mask, if that’s what it takes to get me into the stadium. I’ll let them take my temperature at the stadium gate. I’ll also get tested before every game I want to attend, after the game also, if I can. Minor inconveniences, IMO.

    Like

  6. This is mildly annoying to read.

    Regarding the five factors these expert doctors came up with: no shit- that is all pretty much common sense. Senator- if someone came to you a year ago and explained Coronavirus in 2 sentences I have no doubt if would take you less than 10 minutes to come up with those 5 factors these esteemed experts concluded after studying it for 6 months.

    The factor about outside being generally safer is especially rich considering we had to listen to numerous “experts” tell us for a couple months that we should just stay indoors. And, ordinary people got shamed by various groups including their own neighbors for violating “the rules” that another set “experts” drew up.

    Like

    • Gosh, it seems so obvious when you explain it. Makes you wonder how anybody got sick in the first place.

      Like

      • “Mr. Spicoli- Do you think you would more likely to catch a virus from someone in 1) a musty gymnasium, or 2) on the bright outdoor soccer field?
        “Gosh, Mr. Hand, I don’t know”

        Like

    • mddawg

      I think the key part about everyone staying indoors to stop the spread was that it isolated people. So if you or someone living under the same roof had it, yes you could spread it to the others in the same household, but at least you weren’t spreading it to everyone around you at a restaurant, at work, on public transit, etc. Those aren’t open-air spaces like most sporting venues. So, speaking in really broad terms, being isolated is preferable to being crowded together in a stadium or at the beach, but either of those is still better than being crowded together in an office building. At least that’s how I understand it.

      Like

    • Dylan Dreyer's Booty

      They didn’t say to stay indoors. They said not to congregate around other people and to stay home. They actually said that getting out and getting fresh air was good as long as you kept distance.

      Like

  7. PTC DAWG

    More testing, more positives…

    Like

  8. Paul

    I actually took a look at UGA’s plan. One of the things that struck me was that even if they open the doors to full capacity crowds the plan is no bags in and no cash transactions. Women are gonna go ballistic if they cannot carry a bag in. But the Athletic Department doesn’t want to search bags. So no bags. No cash either. No touch transactions. Let’s see if they stick to their guns on these two points.

    Like

    • Debby Balcer

      With clear bags there is no reason to search them. I guess people can smuggle all the booze in they want if they are not searching.

      Like

      • Paul

        That’s not what the plan says. It says no bags. Of any kind. Not clear bags. No bags.

        Like

        • Debby Balcer

          I was saying it is dumb not not allow clear bags not that they allowed them. There are things ladies need to carry into a game that won’t in pockets unless they wear cargo shorts.

          Like

          • Paul

            Agreed. That’s why I think there will be a lot of blowback if they actually try to implement this aspect of the plan.

            Like

  9. Debby Balcer

    Greenville is a hot spot right now. The head of DHEC Dr Bell said we had cases spread through people in the same household and we also had 33% of cases in the Latino community. Mask wearing was more prevalent when things first opened up but yesterday when I went to the grocery store most people were not wearing one. Our percentage of people being tested being positive is higher so it is not just more testing. The next few weeks will be telling.

    Like

    • ASEF

      Start in downtown Asheville, and you will see lots and lots of masks.

      As you head south on 25, you see progressively fewer.

      Personally, I am trying to figure out the percentage of people who bother to put a mask on their face but yank it down every time they talk or just leave it there over their chin. Gotta protect that chin.

      Like

  10. Normaltown Mike

    The Georgia Way would be to follow the idea from the below piece and host “Defund the Police” rallies on certain Saturdays this fall…

    https://babylonbee.com/news/churchgoers-avoid-arrest-by-disguising-themselves-as-rioters

    Like