Pretzel logic

Ho-kay.

First thought:

Second thought:  along those lines, I’m trying to understand the logic of thinking “it’s not safe for students to come back to campus after a week at home” and also thinking “… unless they’re football players”.

54 Comments

Filed under Academics? Academics., Georgia Football, The Body Is A Temple

54 responses to “Pretzel logic

  1. It has nothing to do with a week at home and has everything to do with moving into prime flu season.

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  2. AceDawg

    So the home stretch of college football games will be played online? Interesting…

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  3. Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

    I wonder if part of this has anything to do with shutting facilities down to fit into a budget that’s had to be rewritten due to lower than expected admissions.

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    • Ricky McDurden

      As far as I know, Admissions haven’t been impacted (not yet, anyway; will find out during move-in in mid-August I suppose) but I think trying to be the servant of two masters in that respect is why they’re doing what they’re doing: trying to have a mostly normal semester to get freshmen to campus while also trying to wrap up early to avoid an outbreak (which as football has already shown us is virtually inevitable no matter what month of the year we are in). Also, 11% budget cut has already been sent into the state legislature for approval so I don’t think a few extra weeks of keeping the lights off is a factor.

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    • Facilities don’t cost as much to operate as all that. Plus when they send students home they have to refund a portion of room and board.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

        That’s a good point.

        I also imagine in making this decision they didn’t consult with the Athens-CC Chamber of Commerce, either.

        I love Athens, the town itself. It’s a living, breathing thing. I feel terribly for all of the businesses that are still closed. I worry what will happen if they have to close again. We’ve seen defeats of unwelcome changes to the downtown infrastructure before (like Wal-Mart), but there are less and less local small businesses downtown and more and more franchises and even a Starbucks. In the town that birthed Jittery Joes, the best coffee there is, there’s a freaking Starbucks on College and Broad.

        You know, Schoolkids closing when I was still in school was a huge blow to me. I can’t imagine Wuxtry closing down for good next, but if this continues, it’s a reality of what’s to come.

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    • Faltering Memory

      Lower admissions-hell. Recruiting is suffering.

      I did read the rest of the responses. Same old stuff.

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  4. Glcdawg

    PINK FLOYD said it best. “💰, I certainly was in the right!”

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  5. TNDAWG

    In this new world of empowered college football players, they have the choice of playing or not. Don’t they? And where in the message did it say they were going on line after Thanksgiving because it wasn’t safe? Could be a money saving move, not a safety move.

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  6. How confusing. Just making it up as we go.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Jim

    We are far from the first school to do this or something similar. Pretty sure South Cackalacky announced weeks ago they would be starting classes earlier than planned in order to be finished by Thanksgiving.

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  8. “The 17-time grand slam champion said he was sorry that the tournament had caused harm and acknowledged “we were wrong and it was too soon.” He said that the organizers would be sharing health resources with those who attended the events in Belgrade, Serbia, and Zadar, Croatia.
    “I am so deeply sorry our tournament has caused harm. Everything the organizers and I did the past month, we did with a pure heart and sincere intentions. We believed the tournament met all health protocols and the health of our region seemed in good condition to finally unite people for philanthropic reasons. We were wrong and it was too soon. I can’t express enough how sorry I am for this and every case of infection,” he said in the statement published on his Twitter account.

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  9. “As COVID-19 cases surge in Georgia, a campus union has started a petition drive urging the University System of Georgia to require face coverings on campus this fall and adopt other strict safety measures.

    More than 900 people had signed an online petition begun by the United Campus Workers of Georgia as of Monday afternoon. The petition on Change.org asks that masks be provided and required for all in the system’s campus communities, including the University of Georgia.

    The petition also asks that no faculty, staff or students “will be compelled to be face to face,” and that free and frequent COVID-19 testing will be available for all those groups.”

    Cowering

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    • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

      LOL. Covid cases are “surging.” This is the new way to describe what happens when testing more provides more positive tests. That must be that “new Math” I always hear about but thankfully was never subjected to.

      Reality says we’ve now had the lowest number of covid-19 related deaths day to day, week to week. From the peak in mid-March, we’ve had an 89% reduction in deaths.

      Why?

      Because we have worked to protect the vulnerable (the elderly, those with preexisting conditions) and the shutdown, which did go on too long, prevented the health care system from being overrun. Again, people want to keep moving the goalposts, but that was the stated goal of the shutdown: Prevent the healthcare system from being overrun. Okay, mission accomplished. Now we have to go on with the living with this reality part of our program. The part where healthy people under the age of 60 contract the virus and become “new cases” but you know, don’t die at a statistically significant number not even approaching the amount of deaths from pneumonia.

      Apologizing for infections of healthy people is the height of stupidity. Some may become sick and recover. Others won’t suffer a whit. Life should be going on, so at this point the question keeps popping into my mind:

      Why is the media and so many people in government invested on keeping us hysterically frightened of a virus that is less deadly to healthy people under the age of 60 than pneumonia?

      They don’t shut everything down during cold and flu season.

      Liked by 2 people

      • You’re smarter than everyone in charge. Why didn’t that ask you to begin with?! We could have been saved all this trouble. Damn.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

          I’m not smarter than everyone in charge. What I am willing to do is look at the available data, free for all to see on the CDC website, and make informed decisions.

          It’s interesting, the quotes meant to scare from the epidemiologist. She’s not telling us anything we don’t already know. Of course covid-19 is super contagious. It is. That’s a fact.

          That fact in and of itself is not scary though. You know what else is super-contagious? Acute viral nasopharyngitis. Otherwise known as the common cold. A virus being contagious has nothing to do with the morbidity of the virus.

          We also have an extremely good idea of that. Healthy people under the age of 60 with no preexisting conditions have nothing to fear from covid-19. It’s literally what the data says.

          So again, why are we still being fed reports and updates that are meant to create a hysterical fear of this virus when we’ve taken steps to protect those who are most vulnerable and by all rights should not fear if we are healthy and under the age of 60?

          Seriously, have you read ANYWHERE in any paper or heard on any cable news network or on any social media site about the 89% reduction in covid-19 deaths since the high point? Why isn’t this the biggest news going right now? Even more so than the protests and everything surrounding that?

          Liked by 2 people

          • I don’t take issue with anything you said (except perhaps “healthy people under the age of 60 with no preexisting conditions have nothing to fear…” — I think that statement’s a bit to cut-and-dry versus reality). I am very curious to know what you are proposing, exactly. No restrictions whatsoever, anywhere (other than nursing homes, hospitals, etc.)? And it’s up to individuals to protect themselves if they are vulnerable?

            My concern is the same as it’s ever been. That without mandated social distancing measures (including some forced closures and requiring masks, etc.) the virus would have killed 480,000 Americans by this time, not 120,000. Do you think I’m unreasonable in this?

            To state it plainly, I truly belief the restrictions put in place over the last three months have saved hundreds of thousands of American lives. And it’s not just because I believe more Americans would have been infected, and therefore more would have died. It’s also because I believe the death rate would have been higher because more hospitals would have been over-whelmed at the peak and unable to provide necessary care for hundreds of thousands. Do you disagree? And if so, based on what?

            It’s why even today I am wary as the death count continues to decline. I am glad to see it continue to slide…. but I think it’s doing so in large part BECAUSE of restrictions. And not in spite of them. And I do believe that as Americans become more relaxed — and dare I say, more willing to believe that COVID is really “no big deal” — that we risk a second wave that is greater than the first.

            Would I have liked to have seen businesses re-open sooner? Definitely. But do I think my governor (Larry Hogan, Maryland) struck a proper balance and did the right thing making sure health and safety was the #1 priority? Yeah. I do. I also believe that because of our success (so far) we stand a better chance of navigating the second wave, whereas others who’ve live in areas where leaders have downplayed the virus have lulled their folks into a false sense of security.

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            • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

              We already know the restrictions put in place (the government mandated shutdowns of businesses and school) did not save lives. Masks and social distancing save lives. That is a fact. The government shutdowns of our economy were, after 2-4 weeks, wholly unnecessary and will continue to have damaging effects for years.

              As for you taking issue with what I’ve said about healthy people under 60 years old, you’re welcome to your feelings but your feelings can’t dispute the facts. A healthy person under 60 is more likely to do of pneumonia than COVID-19. I healthy person under 30 is more likely to be struck by lightning than die or COVID-19. A healthy person under 21 is more likely to die in a shark attack. There is a reason it’s called “statistically insignificant.” It means that while it can and will happen to a few unlucky souls, the odds that it happens is astronomical.

              We must be safe. We must continue to protect those who are most vulnerable. But for everyone else? Get back to work. Get back to school. Fully reopen the economics and let’s go about picking up the pieces in a responsible matter. I am generally not for government mandates of anything. The government doesn’t force people to wear a condom when they have sex, yet the result there if they don’t (pregnancy, STDs, HIV/AIDS) can be just as bad or worse than this virus. So no, I would not force people to wear a mask. Depending on the situation, just like with the condoms, I will wear a mask, but that’s my choice. I leave it to others to make their choices.

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              • Your grasp of statistics is sorely wanting. I’ve already debunked the “more likely to die by a lightning strike” argument here:
                https://blutarsky.wordpress.com/2020/05/22/back-to-campus/#comment-730346

                But I’ll gladly copy and paste my refutation for the general edification of everyone…..

                1) “18-23 year olds have a better chance of being struck by lightning than they do to die from Covid”
                This is such a misleading statement. You’re taking total number of 18-23yo deaths versus the total number of 18-23 year olds, but that’s stupid. Because transmission has been limited by CLOSING SCHOOLS and society at large.
                The case fatality rate for 18-23 year olds is accurately estimated at 0.1-0.2%. This means if an 18-23 year old in this country tests positive for COVID19 they have at least a 1 in 1,000 chance to die. The chances of getting struck by lightning are approximately 1 in 1,000,000. So, by your own measure, COVID19 is at least 1,000x a more potential danger to returning student athletes.

                2) Suicide rate for age 20-24 is approximately .128 out of 1,000, so if you test positive for COVID19 you’re 10X more likely to die from it than suicide.

                3) estimated flu case mortality rate for age 18-49 in the 2018-19 flue season was .021%…. I’m assuming it was even less than that for 18-23, but even taking this higher number .021% this means that if someone age 18-23 tests positive for COVID19 they are at least 5X more likely to die than if they show symptoms and/or test positive for a common flu strain.

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                • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

                  Seems like you don’t understand how morbidity if a virus works.

                  The virus is not deadly to people under the age of 21. At all. It has NOTHING TO DO WITH CLOSING SCHOOLS.

                  The virus does not effect a young, healthy immune system like it does the elderly or those with preexisting conditions.

                  You haven’t debunked shit other than to prove there’s no lengths people will go to live in a reality governed by how they feel as opposed to what is.

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                • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

                  Seriously, again… you and others conflate infection rates with morbidity.

                  More kids and more young adults could’ve been infected, on that you are correct.

                  However, and really listen to me here, they would not die in any statistically significant amount.

                  If all those kids and young adults would’ve gotten infected, the only thing it would have done is drive the morbidity rate even lower.

                  It really is like talking to a child, I swear to God.

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      • Derek

        Where’s that “Mission Accomplished” banner?

        You know the deaths come AFTER the infections right?

        Peak cases in the US was on 4/24. Peak deaths followed on 5/6.

        We don’t yet know what the surge of cases will lead to in terms of a spike in deaths.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

          You keep conflating “cases” with deaths, and it’s simply not so.

          The death tolls continue to drop in part because as we test more people, we find more people who are either currently infected or who have antibodies.

          This is something I’ve said for over two months: Far more people were exposed late last year and early this year than anyone realized, and testing would prove that.

          Guess what Derek, it has. You can keep spinning it any way you want, but the deaths continue to decline from the high. You can’t argue against that.

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          • Derek

            Daily cases exceeded 30k for the first time since 5/1 on 6/20.

            You do not know, though you may pretend to, that deaths will not spike in response to the surge in cases.

            Very recent history says you need about 12 days to know.

            If you think deaths will be lower on July 3rd than they were on June 21st, then say so. We’ll see how good you are at being Kreskin.

            Liked by 1 person

        • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

          Again, the vast majority of the deaths from covid-19, VAST MAJORITY, were from the elderly. The reason why NY and NJ had something like 55% of all deaths in the United States is because of the decisions of both governors to return infected seniors back to their nursing homes.

          Cuomo killed a ton of grandparents the last few months, Derek. How do you feel about that?

          New infections from healthy people under the age of 60 will not result in deaths in any statistically significant numbers. That’s the facts.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Derek

            Trump said during Ebola that all blame starts at the top with the president. TWO AMERICANS DIED President EBOLA!!!

            Who am I to argue?

            Liked by 1 person

            • spur21

              Derek why do always move the goalpost?

              Liked by 1 person

              • Derek

                Why is it that people don’t understand how to correctly use metaphors like “moving the goalposts” and “straw man” arguments?

                No goal post was moved by me. I did note that a goal post had been previously established and with unquestionable clarity.

                However, the guy who set the goal post so neatly and cleanly then proceeded to later bury it rather than be troubled by simply moving it.

                Not that you have even the slightest bit of a problem with being micturated upon and calling it a warm summer rain.

                Now THAT’S a metaphor.

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  10. Those days are gone forever, over a long time ago. . . oh yea.

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  11. Normaltown Mike

    It’s to protect aged faculty, staff and vulnerable students – none of whom play football.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Sweet D

    I think they are doing it to keep the enrollment up and get the tuition money. I know I went to Athens because of the campus and city life. If a kid has to do it online, might as well do it at the local CC. They are also bucking at paying full ride for online vs face to face instruction.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Labs, social orders, programs, debate, dorms, intramurals, study groups, volunteer work, blood drives, on and on are a major part of building more mature adults and why we have college. Just managing your daily schedule alone is part of it.

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