I find your lack of faith disturbing.

You know, I can actually hear conference commissioners’ balls shrink as they read this:

But for those pressing forward to play, heed one warning: The lawyers will be circling. Not the ones counseling conferences to avoid trifling with players’ health, but the ones who will be doing the suing if, God forbid, a player dies, has long-term damage or career-threatening complications. In an email to Sports Illustrated, prominent college sports attorney Tom Mars offered this chilling view of what the Big 12, ACC and SEC could be getting into:

“Whatever conference(s) decides to play football this fall will be taking a ridiculously high risk they may soon regret. I know and have talked with some of the best plaintiff’s lawyers in the country this week, and they’re praying the SEC, Big 12 and/or the ACC are greedy enough to stay the course. If things go sideways, the plaintiff’s Bar will immediately get their hands on the internal financial analyses of the schools (a FOIA layup), get the conference financials through the discovery process, and then just stand in front of the jurors and point to the conferences that decided not to risk the health of their student-athletes. Good Lord, I’d hate to be the lawyers defending those cases.”

And the attorneys lining up to represent plaintiffs? “These are lawyers who’ve already slain bigger dragons than the SEC, and they can afford to finance the most expensive litigation on the planet. As a coalition, they’d be the legal equivalent of the Death Star.”

But fear not, fellas!  Brian Kemp’s got ‘yer backs.

“Across the South, college football is a sacred tradition, and I want to see it played this year if we can ensure the safety of players, coaches and staff,” Kemp said in a social media message.

“Based on recent discussions with university leaders and sports officials, I am confident that they are putting the health and well-being of our student athletes first.”

Well, shit, he’s nailed everything else about the pandemic so far. What could go wrong listening to him now?

24 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, Political Wankery, See You In Court

24 responses to “I find your lack of faith disturbing.

  1. Joe Blow

    “Across the South, college football is a sacred tradition.” Jesus, Mary and Joseph. The Oxford dictionary defines sacred as “ Connected with God (or the gods) or dedicated to a religious purpose and so deserving veneration.”
    So my smart ass comment wonders if this is the same religion of pedophile priests, or Jimmy Swaggert’s whores, or Jerry Falwell’s racism and corruption or the fraud of Praise the Lord club, just to name a few. I am so tired of God being used to justify Human stupidity, cruelty And corruption. God doesn’t give a fuck about SEC football. God ain’t gonna protect football players from Covid. As a religious person myself, I think it’s time for politicians to shut up about God and religion. Calling football sacred is SACRILEGE. Yeah, and I’m Southern and go to church.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Granthams Replacement

    I asked s question about signing a waiver a few days ago and timed it with Danny’s tweet. I now realize why a waiver would be unthinkable – it leaves the lawyers with nothing.

    Like

    • You assume the waivers would be enforceable on their face.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Granthams Replacement

        I assume 99%+ of the big 10 and pac 10 players would agree to a waiver. You are right, the presidents know that Morgan and Morgan would be on the case challenging the waiver.

        Like

        • Spell Dawg

          A waiver doesn’t absolve negligence or bad faith. Players start getting really sick or dying, torts aren’t the only liability they’ll face.

          Like

          • Down Island Way

            Dispense of the governors comments, he is a politician and knows not what he says….lawyers and fees paid by the ncaa are to great for my one good brain cell to comprehend, going forward with the 2020 season (?) may pay a small dividend, the overall big picture price/damage could be one that i don’t care to comprehend….still believe cha$ing the monie$ connected to marchmadness is a better plan for banking….

            Like

  3. Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

    People can sue for anything they want, but will they win? I can’t imagine liability works that way considering there is far more danger of catching COVID-19 in the regular student population.

    Now, if they cancelled classes and there was no student and faculty on campus and they still played football, and they played and someone got sick and the worst case scenario happened, there would be an actual case, right?

    But liability? Good luck proving they got the virus playing football and not in class or the dorm or the dining hall. Funny how they make it about football while ignoring all the other students.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Spell Dawg

      Contact tracing won’t be hard in a population that is monitored & tested regularly.

      Like

      • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

        Even for the players, that’s a big nope, because again, they’re in the student population. It would be almost impossible to contact trace the entire student population.

        The controls around the football players are there to keep them from spreading COVID-19 should they catch it (most likely from the student population) and to ensure they don’t practice or play if they are symptomatic which could cause further health complications.

        Like

        • Spell Dawg

          Again, in a population tested regularly, it’s not that difficult. The window of infection is smaller if they are tested weekly and the routine of a college football player during the season is largely a well-worn path. Tracing would be pedestrian, countries do it effectively.

          Like

    • HirsuteDawg

      You hit the nail on the head in your second paragraph. I suspect college campuses won’t be open for in-class participation long. Just watching the schools in Georgia try to hold classes is painful. And we haven’t even gotten to flu season yet. It is gonna be ugly.

      Like

    • Derek

      The lead plaintiff won’t be the irresponsible guy that brings the virus into the game/practice/building, it will be the careful guy who caught it from the guy who brought it in the game/practice/building. They only have to prove that it was more likely than not caught from a documented case who he had close contact with. The defense can chase other possibilities, but good luck.

      You can’t apply fan liability (of which I think there is little) to player liability.

      Unless the SEC has a warning to players that says:

      “Playing in 2020 is unsafe and may result in death” they’re open to litigation because they will be saying exactly the opposite. They will be representing to the public and the players: we think we can play safely.

      If they turn out wrong, its their balls on the chop.

      Like

  4. How can anyone read this, “have talked with some of the best plaintiff’s lawyers in the country this week, and they’re praying the SEC, Big 12 and/or the ACC are greedy enough to stay the course. If things go sideways, the plaintiff’s Bar will immediately get their hands on the internal financial analyses of the schools (a FOIA layup), get the conference financials through the discovery process, and then just stand in front of the jurors and point to the conferences that decided not to risk the health of their student-athletes. ” and not think what a scumbag bunch he’s talking to.

    Like

  5. huntindawg

    I would defend this case all day long and win it 8 out of 10 times. Point to the number of students that contracted the virus versus the number of football players. The players are in a vastly safer environment with vastly easier access to the best medical care. Have the plaintiff prove that’s where they contracted the virus and that they would not have contracted it otherwise.

    Like

  6. trbodawg

    “Sacred tradition”. . . I wonder if it’s too late for the SEC to re-organize as a religion? Imagine the the tax benefits.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Ozam

    So how would a TBD Covid issue (irrespective of how and when it was contracted), be different than any other normal football related injury, including death. We play football despite those inherent risks.

    And, I do not find waivers objectionable..they are standard for just about any sporting event you sign up your child to play. No one if forcing anyone to do anything.

    Like

  8. faulknersghost

    Vaccine or no vaccine, Covid isn’t going anywhere. No vaccine is close to being 100% effective. If this is the new litigation normal. Might as well shut it all down for several years. Let the kids and their parents decide and then move on.
    As far as Kemp is concerned, he’s no Killer Cuomo that’s for sure.

    Like