“It’s the American way to be able to leverage your gifts and your talents.”

Those of you who insist that allowing college athletes to monetize their NIL rights will cause the college sports world to devolve into a game of unchecked boosters throwing sums of money at the privileged few, while the rest of the peons get the back of the market’s hand and are forced to stew over the unfairness of it all… well, as Spock once put it,

There’s a whole new social media world you aren’t getting.

When the NCAA adopts NIL rights, which appears inevitable, it’s possible some top-tier athletes could earn more than $1 million annually in endorsement deals, said Casey Schwab, CEO of Altius Sports Partners, a consulting firm focused on NIL legislation for athletes, coaches and schools, adding that the benefits won’t be limited to big-sport superstars.

A new study from Temple University’s School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management found the potential for NIL revenue, on average, was actually greater for female college athletes than men, and athletes outside the revenue sports of football and men’s basketball could still cultivate valuable brands.

“[College athletes] are really engaging a specific and targeted audience from a demographic perspective,” said Dr. Thilo Kunkel, the author of the Temple study. “They’re becoming really effective endorsers — and maybe it’s not the next national shampoo commercial, but it’s companies more focused on getting their brand out there and connecting with an audience.”

Kunkel’s study showed that athletes outside the revenue sports of football and men’s basketball could still earn about $5,000 per year with just 10,000 followers on various social media platforms. Engagement is critical, so the value would depend more on content and frequency of new posts than actual on-field accomplishments.

Even athletes with smaller social media followings would still have some value, Schwab said. He calls this the “in kind” group, athletes who might be able to snag a few free pizzas at a local restaurant in exchange for posting a photo with the owner to Twitter.

For most of these athletes, their college years are going to be the only time they’ll be able to maximize their NIL worth.  For an organization that invented and relentlessly promoted the “There are over 400,000 NCAA student-athletes, and most of us will go pro in something other than sports” line, you’d think the NCAA would be on top of this.  So should we.

61 Comments

Filed under It's Just Bidness, The NCAA

61 responses to ““It’s the American way to be able to leverage your gifts and your talents.”

  1. But, but, but Phil Knight is going to turn Nike cash into the Oregon football recruiting ATM, or Bammer car dealers are just going to outbid everyone else.

    Will there be unintended consequences of this? Just like everything else, yes. Is it likely going to be better than the current system? Again, likely yes. NLI is the right thing to do.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Derek

      With “likely” on your side who can stand against you?

      Liked by 1 person

      • classiccitycanine

        You do the same thing Derek. Your pearl clutching over the “likely” abuses has no more merit than the comment you’re critiquing.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Derek

          I welcome your comment when I suggest some significant policy change because it’s “likely” to result in a better outcome and that said likelihood outweighs undefined, unintended negative consequences. Or you you could point to an example here. Or you could stfu. Your choice.

          Like

      • I said “likely” because who knows what the outcome will be. All I know is that I believe it’s the right thing to do over the status quo.

        Like

        • Derek

          Don’t we need to have some level of confidence that exceeds “likely?”

          My biggest frustration in this debate has been the intentional blind spots that seem to be part of the pro-nil contingent.

          No one wants to talk regulations. No one wants to talk harms.

          It seems to me that the main value that is being promoted is making sure that the kids who will be wealthy in their early twenties get started in their late teens. I see a lot more problems here than positives.

          My confidence level on that exceeds “likely.” It’s at “definitely.”

          Like

          • spur21

            Wealthy in their late teens- surely you jest.

            Liked by 2 people

          • classiccitycanine

            Almost all of these athletes “go pro in something other than sports” so most of these athletes will not get rich.

            Your argument sounds the same as the people who oppose MARTA because brown people might use it to rob their TVs even though they have no evidence to back that up.

            The current situation is 100% wrong and NIL compensation will improve that situation without a doubt. Will unintended consequences occur? Maybe, but the Olympic model seems to have worked reasonably well for US athletes. There’s no reason to think it can’t work for college athletes.

            Or, you can tell supporters to “Eat cake” and STFU. It’s funny how so many liberals like yourself stop caring for others when you think it MIGHT negatively impact you.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Derek

              Well no shit. Thats why I said that the only ones who would make anything of note with unlimited NIL WILL make money soon enough. Can you read those words? Try slowly. One word at a time. So for most players in America, this change would be meaningless. But lets risk the whole deal so Trevor’s recruitment and enrollment are more profitable, right? I mean he’ll have 10’s of millions in June but is that really soon enough, to be “fair”? Think of the children!!

              Brown people? Wtf are you talking about? I’m trying to see to it that these kids aren’t put up for sale in some half ass auction. How racist of me to think that a market of largely poor and black kids is less than optimal. I like the idea of them thinking about their education and their college experience rather than simply signing with the “highest bidder.” How awful of me.

              Trust me. I won’t be affected either way. Not sure how I would be.

              Its pretty typical among those who fail to think things through to believe that people who do see everything through a lens of ideology.

              I don’t have an ideology. I look at an issue. I try to assess the facts, my sense of human nature and that of history and make a judgment. You should try it some time.

              My perspective here is this: you start buying and selling teenagers and you’re going to regret it. Its too ripe for abuse.

              Scholarship athletics is not supposed to be about profit. It is supposed to be integrated into the academic experience. We’re far afield. NIL is an ill fitted “solution” and Im not sure that’s even the intent.

              Like

              • rigger92

                It is times like these where you and I totally agree. Yet, I am on the opposite political spectrum as you. I like conservative policy, where I would prefer that people just do the right thing without being forced to by law. Do you espouse the same? Or, do you think that laws need to be made to force the same? I really hate that “laws” need to be made to do what’s right. Shouldn’t we just do right for the sake of being honest and right? Does it HAVE to be a federal/state responsibility? Maybe it should be just common sense? Sorry for the playpen content. I am just bursting with the “why can’t we just be this way without being forced to by a government?”.

                At the same time, in 2020 my business was healthy throughout the year. Right now, we are deep red. Imports through Cali from Japan are at a standstill. 2020 was a record year for us, in 4 weeks we are dead due to the imports floating in the Cali harbor’s that can’t get in and delivered to hospitals.

                Sorry for the after hours rant. I have had a couple cocktails. Stressing big time because we have product stalled out and are unable to receive and deliver. Last year we worked through because the Japan imports through L.A. kept coming. Right now there are receiving/customs problems that have taken our work down from $80K/month to $15K. Funny enough, we don’t qualify for PPP right now because last year we were fine. Now we need PPP because our first quarter will be down more than 50%, but we can’t show that until the end of this month. It will be too late and everything will be spoken for by others (which I understand).

                Goalposts and all. The entire environment is toxic. A lot of people need aid and needed it all last year. A lot of people did not. THIS year, a lot of people will need it and will not get it because last year was survived. We fear that we will be left out. I know we will be left out, and, it isn’t anything we did by design. We just install new medical imaging equipment. Most of it is imported, my customer is from Japan. All the rest comes from GER or CCC. Including General Electric, based in China.

                Sorry for the rant.

                Like

                • Got Cowdog

                  Rant accepted and appreciated. Hang tough Rigger92, that’s a hell of a tough spot.
                  I don’t know that business, what’s the holdup on the equipment?

                  Like

                • junkyardawg41

                  There is a lot of what you say that is very true — timing and perspective make all the difference. As you pointed out, there are government programs which punish you and take care of others…. all because of timing. In the same vain,for every problem NIL compensation solves 2 more pop up in its place. For every problem the current COVID bill solves, 2 more unexpected pop up.

                  Like

                • RangerRuss

                  DammitRigger92! I hate it for you, man. Try to salvage what you can. If this business goes to hell? Don’t take it out on your family and friends. Being nice is inexpensive. Remember what go you where you are now. You’ll make a comeback.
                  Don’t quit!

                  Like

                • Derek

                  I’m pretty much a libertarian on every social issue I can think of. I’m not libertarian on civil rights and economic issues. I don’t think anyone should be free to be racist in business matters. You can be a racist at home if you choose.

                  I don’t think you will ever achieve economic opportunity for all who are capable and willing if you don’t have some way of redistributing wealth. Being run by the idiot grandsons of rich guys while the smart and industrious sons of the shiftless have no opportunity to play in the game is inefficient and does not create wealth long term. And we’ve tried it. Called it the Dark Ages as I recall.

                  We need a system where everyone has the opportunity to succeed and to fail. Being trapped/benefitted in/by the economic class your sperm lottery landed you in is not a healthy system. I know of no way to smooth that out than by the hand of gubmit. Its an evil but its a necessary one. Talent and hard work should carry the day, not class.

                  That said I’m also a free trader. I don’t believe we should protect domestic jobs/industries. I think we should protect domestic wallets as much as we can. I don’t think we should be blind to human right abuses tho. We should trade with countries who have, or are moving to, free democratic societies. Making authoritarian states rich seems short sighted.

                  Thats a brief summary anyway, fwiw.

                  Like

              • classiccitycanine

                “Scholarship athletics is not supposed to be for profit!”
                “I like the idea of them thinking about their education and their college experience rather than simply signing with the “highest bidder.”

                LOLOLOLOL. And I’d like to think Santa was real too, but I live in reality. It’s not about getting Trevor his millions. It’s about not artificially capping someone’s compensation. If the 3rd string O-linemen never see a dime, it still doesn’t make it right to prevent them from having the opportunity. Those are the facts dude. It’s time to take your head out of the sand.

                Like

                • Derek

                  You mean like nfl salary caps?

                  Should US senators have full NIL rights or should they be artificially capped? I mean if Senator Cunty L. Whore of Nebraska wants to have a private autograph signing for the agribusiness community well what are we commies?

                  Maybe Senator Dick Steal of North Carolina can do commercials for RJR tobacco? Or just take the money and not broadcast them because do we really need to know? Why not?

                  It isn’t about anything but integrity. You should look into it. Its an interesting subject. Familiarize yourself.

                  Like

                • classiccitycanine

                  The NFL has a labor union that negotiates the cap. College has no such representation. I have no problems with caps as long as all parties have significant power to negotiate those caps. This is not the case in college.

                  As for you insulting my integrity, well, you have a very long track record of disrespecting everyone here who disagrees with you. Why don’t you clean up your act before you start picking on others!

                  Like

  2. 79dawg

    Who will be the first commenter on GTP to complain that Player X should spend more time at practice, studying film, etc. and less time promoting himself on social media???
    Whose the first player to whine and get sour about getting blowback from their 100,000+ followers after a poor performance???
    Who will be the first sponsor to publicly cut a kid’s sponsorship after a poor performance, dumb mistake, etc?
    Are we going to be able to cut guys and yank scholarships for guys who spend 20 hours a day on twitter or facebook, promoting themselves to try and get paid???
    Just a couple of tough questions I can think of right off the top of my head… (and yes, I am aware that there are some current parallels, but social media has immediacy and directness that most of the other parallels lack…)

    Liked by 1 person

    • ASEF

      Lol. As if football players who can’t prioritize and focus on football don’t already get the “hit the bricks” talk with coaches.

      And, news flash: anyone with a teenager can tell you they are always on social media anyway, always connected, always working their “brand.” They don’t think of it that way, but that’s how that generation is wired.

      But yes, older fans will gripe along those lines. Kids today… (snarling sounds)

      Speaking of which, anyone heard from Macallan lately? He could be grumpy as hell when he veered from football, but he was a fixture around here. Haven’t seen anything from in… months.

      Liked by 4 people

  3. spur21

    I’ve grown weary of the arguments for and against NLI – just do it and allow me to enjoy college football.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. RangerRuss

    I hesitated posting because of the negative tech connotations, but…

    Nerds R Us !!

    I’m kidding of course. Love me some Spock and Star Trek. I love allowing young people the freedom to legitimately make all the money they can unfettered by a bunch of wealthy hypocrites even more.

    Like

  5. stoopnagle

    Anna Kournickova. Remember her? She made more money than the women knocking her out of tournaments for one reason. She never won anything of note but she had the look.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Ray S

      Oh yeah, Buddy! I remember her well! Lol. Very true about her success in singles, but I think she won several titles in doubles…with multiple women! Maybe one on one is not her thing and she prefers the group thing? 🤔😏

      Liked by 2 people

  6. The athletes mentioned in this article are college athletes, each one supported and promoted by her college.

    So, if the college athlete can monetize her NIL, what % of that money should go to her college?

    Like

    • The same percentage that college students who aren’t athletes pay.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Derek

        Because the students value is totally in sync with the university’s.

        I mean a computer science student who invents a new video game is exactly the same as the starting qb at uga. For each one, its the university that matters.

        I always want to know whether the new invention came from a guy who went to Cal Tech or MIT. Its all that matters really.

        Like, you know, football.

        Liked by 1 person

        • You know, if you agree to the flip side of your argument, that the schools need to split the TV money with the players in some form or fashion, I could find some common ground with you.

          Like

          • Derek

            Agreed. I think that addresses almost everything. I do get concerned that the coaches will be encouraged to care that much less about the academic mission, but how much worse could it get?

            A conference wide predetermined percentage of tv revenue distributed to every scholly athlete (half scholly, gets half share) works for me. Of course, you’d also need a floor on numbers of teams/schollys. I’d like to see how the numbers look and what percentages make sense.

            Like

        • Ray S

          Confession time for me! My heart went to UGA but my brain went to Clemson. I got a PhD in chemistry from CU and got my education for free plus an $18,000 annual stipend. I developed a technology and was awarded a patent with my Professor and the University as co-applicants. I earned exactly $1 for the patent while my Professor and the University get all the money from royalties, licensing or selling of the patent. Funny thing is, my research ended up in Victoria’s Secret lingerie! Lol. I’m not arguing that I was done wrong or for/against NIL, but only to inform readers that similar models are already in place for academics where the Universities bring in revenue generated from the work of students. I was never considered an employee of the school even though I was paid by Clemson. The University provided my education and all the chemicals, instruments, resources and access to technology that allowed me to succeed and grow professionally. There are obvious parallels of students that generate money either through academics or athletics.

          Liked by 2 people

          • You owe us the full story on this!

            Headline: Damon Evans found to have been examining Clemson student’s patent

            Liked by 1 person

            • Got Cowdog

              Beat me to it! Well done!

              Liked by 2 people

            • Ray S

              Lol, the Evan’s response was classic! It’s not quite as sexy as it sounds but here it goes! I’m an analytical chemist and we were developing a technique to separate compounds in liquid using capillary channels. We developed a shape of fiber with high surface area and bc of the shape, capillary action would occur and liquids would wick along the length of the fiber. We made fibers out of different polymers to separate various classes of compounds and measured what came out and how much. Due to laws of physics, the results were not even close to the quality of separations techniques currently available but it was a novel technique that could have a niche use. Victoria’s Secret saw the potential of these fiber shapes that would quickly wick liquids away from areas that were, ahem…..moist. The faster and further the liquids would wick, the faster they would dry. So they bought the patent with the idea of using them in panties and sports bras. Same concept in Nike dri-fit.

              Liked by 2 people

      • Dunne, the LSU gymnast, has 3.7 million followers on TikTok and a million more on Instagram. How many followers does Dunne, the LSU programmer and game designer, have? Whatever’s the difference is the direct result of the exposure and training bestowed upon the gymnast by her university.

        Like

        • ASEF

          I have a teenage daughter who was briefly into gymnastics and competitive cheer. That’s an entirely different world, and some of its stars build the foundation of those audiences well before they ever hit college. My then-12-year old daughter at a competition at the WCC in ATL, 2018:

          “Oh, wow, that’s so and so! She has over a million followers on Instagram! OMG, there’s ________. She’s the one I’m always watching on YouTube!”

          Honestly, for some of the Olympic sports, I could see scenarios where the gymnast or swimmer dramatically raises the profile of the university’s program rather than the other way around.

          Liked by 6 people

        • Russ

          Jeremy Bloom didn’t become an Olympic skier by being on the Colorado football team. And Donald De La Haye’s video skills preceded his kicking at UCF. Yet both were denied compensation from those activities by the NCAA if they wanted to also play football. That’s wrong in my book. Any other student would be allowed those benefits.

          https://www.espn.com/college-football/news/story?id=1867015

          https://www.si.com/college/2017/07/31/ucf-kicker-donald-de-la-haye-ineligible-ncaa-youtube-videos

          Liked by 2 people

      • PTC DAWG

        Are all the students getting a free ride? Seems we’re comparing apples to onions here.

        Like

    • Derek

      You have to pretend that one’s NIL value is exactly the same at West Georgia as it is at UGA. Otherwise, uga inhibiting someone from capitalizing upon its brand would seem all too rational.

      Like

      • “The Cavinder twins collectively,” said Blake Lawrence, CEO of the marketing firm Opendorse, “have almost as big of an influence in terms of value as Trevor Lawrence.”

        Maybe you should explain to them that they should quit pretending, too.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. junkyardawg41

    I always find these discussions interesting. For those who point to the Olympic Model as a go by, would you be ok with the NCAA putting in a Rule 40 like the IOC did? (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_40) Rule 40 is for 9 days before the games, the games and 3 then days after. I would think the NCAA might apply to the entire fall season of games in college football.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I have mostly stayed away from NIL discussion. I am a big fence sitter on this honestly – on one hand, I want to support a traditional model. On the other hand, not owning your own name is stupid AF (just like growing a plant and using it personally is illegal, its stupid AF). I am concerned about unintended consequences. Once the lid is off, its not going back on. But it seems we are at the precipice, and I’d rather rip the bandaid off and get it on at this point. Reminds me of the State of Georgia flag argument, when I hit the point of “its happening anyway, please do it and STFU about it already, for all y’alls”

    Liked by 6 people

  9. Ozam

    College football is the sole remaining sport I hold dear (this coming from someone who was sports obsessed as a kid). I sure hope I get the pleasure of one more MNC (was a sophomore in 80-81) before it goes off the tracks.

    I understand change is inevitable. It doesn’t mean I have to agree with it or like it.

    Liked by 4 people

  10. PTC DAWG

    On the flip side, how many “followers” on social media would these athletes have if (name your school) didn’t offer them an opportunity to play sports at the highest level in College, Be on TV, etc? ….the pendulum swings both ways here.

    Liked by 1 person