Dollars and sense

I almost feel like I need to pin this post as a permanent answer to those who ask me why I like college football as much as I do, despite the way it treats the hired help.  Here’s David Hale’s take:

Screenshot_2021-03-18 💫🅰️♈️🆔 on Twitter

Screenshot_2021-03-18 💫🅰️♈️🆔 on Twitter(1)

The only thing I can add to that is to say that those who see player compensation as the red line that ruins college football forever, despite every over the top commercial decision schools and the NCAA have implemented over the past two decades that have steadily degraded the sport, have a remarkable ability to hold their noses.  That’s part of the problem, which the NCAA and schools are more than happy to exploit.

There’s absolutely no reason they can’t do better.  They should be held accountable to do so, if for no other reason than to preserve the good things that Hale references.

29 Comments

Filed under The NCAA

29 responses to “Dollars and sense

  1. J.R. Clark

    College boosters have been paying football players significant amounts of money under the table for more than a century. Why does it suddenly degrade the sport to allow the boosters to pay them over the table?

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    • Because a lot of people don’t want to see the sausage being made.

      Liked by 3 people

      • It’s also a placism thing. If it’s out in the open, then a lot of those same people have to watch young black athletes openly live their lives outside of this underground economy.

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      • Agreed here. Pay the players openly, see them endorsing local biz, etc. and it does eliminate that last shred of nostalgia that you may hold onto that lets you believe that your players are actually like you because they went to your school and their players are actually like them because they went to theirs.

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        • “… because they went to your school…”

          Actually, shouldn’t that be the essence of what defines college sports?

          I don’t know anyone at this point who believes players are just like us. I sure don’t. But I don’t really care.

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          • Maybe they don’t believe they are “just like us” – but they sure want to believe it.

            Look at the comments from earlier this week with everyone talking about how they miss the player interest stories that Chip Towers can’t get access to anymore.

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        • J.R. Clark

          I hate to break it to some folks, but Charley Trippi, Frankie Sinkwich, Zeke Bratkowski, and Herschel Walker did not enroll at UGA because they loved Athens, the campus, or the students. They came here because somebody supporting Georgia was the highest bidder for their services.

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      • J.R. Clark

        But the same idiotic people are simultaneously fans of the Atlanta Braves/Hawks/Falcons/soccer team and have favorite players who are part of the same (as Michael Corleone put it) hypocrisy.

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  2. I think we can still love a thing and want it to be better too.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. SoCalDawg

    Well said David & Senator. Amen.

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  4. I’m not pay for play guy. I am a supporter of NLI reform. The Georgia, Florida and original California bills seem to be pretty good models. If the NCAA adopted those as a way to define amateurism in college sports, I think the most everyone would be satisfied with the answer.

    The schools created this situation with their attempt to monetize football and men’s basketball to the fullest extent possible through tax-exempt organizations while at the same time, restricting the athlete’s ability to monetize his NIL (or pushing it underground).

    Liked by 3 people

  5. ApalachDawg aux Bruxelles

    Make every student meet eligibility requirements?
    Don’t offer athletic scholarships?
    Everyone pays their own way but can make whatever/however much money that they can?

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  6. Scotty King

    A diploma from a D1 school (not to mention networking, etc.) is certainly worth more than “railroad script”

    Liked by 1 person

  7. MGW

    The best way I can put it is that they want to have it both ways; The Big Business… of Amateur Sports.

    There isn’t a single aspect of college football or basketball that is even remotely amateur, except for the fact that most of the games are played on school property (although most of the important ones are not), and the athletes are enrolled in the schools. Every other element of these sports is purely dictated by the maximization of revenue in a free market.

    Liked by 1 person

    • W Cobb Dawg

      Where’s the free market? There are countless rules to keep the labor in check, while a handful of elites make/monitor the rules and receive excessive compensation. Even students who don’t play or attend games have no recourse other than to contribute via fees. Capitalism for the elite is the governing system, not a free market nor democracy.

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  8. According to AthNet, “there are 10,965 student-athletes on scholarship at Division I football programs. With an average scholarship price tag of $18,273 per year, DI schools shell out a whopping $200 million in football scholarships annually.”

    That’s some pretty good scrip, IMO. And I have yet to read about anyone who turned down that scrip because he’d have to give up his NIL rights for 3 years.

    I guess the athletes also have “a remarkable ability to hold their noses.”

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    • J.R. Clark

      Most of the elite athletes in football or basketball are getting serious money under the table. They don’t give a shit about the scholarship price tag.

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      • If this is the case, why did Todd Gurley think it was necessary to sell his autograph to send money home or AJ Green to sell a jersey to pay for a spring break trip? I think it’s safe to say both of them were elite athletes.

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  9. Pingback: Just like me | Get The Picture