Your 3.24.21 Playpen

This week, we continue the musical theme for the Playpen, but it’s a twofer.

First, from reader Jason:

So I grew up playing the piano. The “piano-forte” – literally “soft-loud” because the player could control the volume based on how hard the keys were struck was invented in the 1700’s, and those musicians who have stood the test of time, were first and foremost masters of that instrument: Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Chopin, Debussy, et al. The guitar, and especially the electric guitar, were invented in the century where we have lived. What musicians from this era will survive and be called “classical” music in the year 2200?

My first thought would be someone like Miles Davis, but honestly, I have no clue.

Speaking of classical music, though, I got a hoot out of this:

Make sure you scan through the entire thread, because it’s great.  How many of you got your first exposure to classical music through cartoons?  I know I did.

91 Comments

Filed under GTP Stuff

91 responses to “Your 3.24.21 Playpen

  1. J.R. Clark

    I believe John Lennon and Paul McCartney, especially Paul McCartney, will be remembered as the classic composers of the 20th century in the same way Mozart and Beethoven are remembered today.

    I also believe Aaron Copland is one of the finest composers in the 20th century. Fanfare For The Common Man, Simple Gifts, and Lincoln Portrait are some of the most spine-tingling musical works I have ever experienced.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. gastr1

    I love playing this for students in my classes. They look up from what they’re doing and say “wait…where is that from again?” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Pk6_z2QExU

    Liked by 1 person

  3. mwodieseldawg

    Carmen in The Bad News Bears.

    Liked by 3 people

  4. KornDawg

    “Kill the wabbit! Kill the wabbit!” is the first thing that comes to mind. Cry of the Valkyries, I believe.

    Liked by 9 people

  5. gastr1

    The first part of the topic seems moot to me. Classical music is a certain style rooted in a certain time and a certain culture; it can still be played and modified and updated, but calling another genre “classical” (like Miles or the Beatles) isn’t how it works.

    Like

    • Russ

      I took it to be what music will survive the centuries liked classical music does today. Many things consider “classical” today certainly weren’t considered that when they debuted.

      Liked by 3 people

  6. I loved those “Ralph Wolf-Sam Sheepdog” cartoons as a kid. Pretty much all the Looney Toons stuff except I never did like Pepé Le Pew or really the Roadrunner cartoons. I know the plot/story line was similar in most cartoons, but those two were pretty much always the same thing over and over.

    Anyway, yes I would say cartoons was my exposure to classical music. That and maybe being in a production of “Peter and the Wolf” when I was 5 with some local symphony group. Is that classical music? I can’t even recall. I do recall being upset I had to play Peter and didn’t get to wear the cool Wolf mask. I also remember my mom telling me she knew my teacher took us all to the restroom prior to the start of the show because I did the whole performance with my fly unzipped. At least you couldn’t tell in the photos printed in the newspaper!

    Like

  7. 3rdandGrantham

    I’m going to go with Chuck Berry. He essentially introduced America (and the world) to both rock and the guitar, and his myriad hits in the 50’s in particular not only stand the test of time, but they were a huge influence on rock stars to come; many of whom still play homage to him even today.

    Chuck’s guitar and music is featured at The Smithsonian, and John Lennon perhaps summed it up best: ‘if you had to give rock and roll another name, you might as well call it Chuck Berry.’ There was also a funny SNL skit from the 70’s, with Steve Martin playing a psychic who just received the first communication from aliens in outter space. Their message: “send more Chuck Berry.”

    The fact that I (as a late Gen-Xer) and my young kids love his music from 70 years ago says quite a bit, not to mention again his influence on musicians even today.

    Liked by 3 people

    • owensborodawg

      Off topic, but this is, I think, the definitive article about Chuck Berry.

      “If you tried to give rock and roll another name,” John Lennon famously said, “you might call it Chuck Berry.”

      On topic, heard more classical music on Saturday morning cartoons in the early 70’s than all cartoons today. Combined.

      Like

  8. Texas Dawg

    Cartoons were certainly my first exposure to classical music. I dated a concert pianist for a while back in the 90’s. I got a heavy exposure to many composers I had never heard of during her practice sessions and recitals. I think her favorite was Debussy. I still will put classical music on for background when I am working in the office. In the car however, it is another classic-Classic Rock.

    Like

  9. 69Dawg

    Bugs Bunny conducting and his classical piano one for me.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. John Williams – our version of classical composition shows up in movie soundtracks

    Liked by 3 people

  11. PTC DAWG

    Jerry Reed.

    Liked by 5 people

  12. Russ

    I’ve often wondered this as well. Beethoven for example was extreme for his time and Ravel received outrage for his music.

    I definitely think Miles will be listened to for years in the future (BTW, check out the American Masters episode on him). The Beatles, Stones, bands like that will remain popular. Beyond that, I think you’re looking at pieces of music (Layla, AATW, some Zeppelin) will survive.

    The difference is that “serious” music used to require a large ensemble but I’m not so sure that’s always the case these days or going forward.

    Oh, and I think Zappa’s music will be reexamined and played in the future.

    Like

  13. I’d say anything classical from recent years would be from eras of defined music. The guitar eras from Hendrix and Berry through Led Zeppelin through Van Halen would definitely be an era that could be referred to as classical, another primary era being, perhaps, disco or funk that bridged into 90s hip hop. I can’t say anything since the boy/girl bands of the late 90s/early 2000s would constitute anything classical, yet, though some techno could maybe make it as classical?

    Like

  14. Idlewild Dawg

    Willie

    Liked by 3 people

  15. Ee hit it, but movies are our classical music in 200 years. You know what a great white shark sounds like? Well we all do. And hans zimmer in interstellar, what he did is a beethoven. He went to many churches to listen and find organs and music. And these composers aren’t just making music, theyre making music with a picture story. Whole ‘nother level

    Liked by 2 people

  16. 123 Fake St

    I’ll never understand how people can watch Ren & Stimpy or Spongebob.

    Liked by 2 people

    • stoopnagle

      You IDDDDDDDIOOOOT!

      Liked by 6 people

    • Got Cowdog

      Have you seen Squidbillies? If R&S or Spongebob got under your skin you’re in for a real treat…

      Liked by 3 people

      • 123 Fake St

        I actually don’t mind them as much as the others. Very small doses though. “I like driving in my truck…”

        Like

      • RangerRuss

        Squidbillies should be required watching for children nationwide. It’s positive message of Auburn sucks! and fuck UPENIS! is transcendent. Additionally, Munson as the voice of God is just appropriate for some reason.

        Like

        • Got Cowdog

          I’d never seen more than the “auburn sucks” clips here until a couple of weeks ago. That’s a funny fucking show.

          Like

          • RangerRuss

            Clips of Unknown Hinson, voice of Early Cuyler, are amusing if you’re into the host shooting his guests. He’s a good musician too. Part Elvis impersonator and part Dracula. I recommend “Unknown Hinson is hilarious” on YouTube for a sample.
            I in no way endorse such peckerwoodery or redneckery.

            Like

            • Got Cowdog

              Quite the opposite. That’s one of the most fun stereotypes to poke fun at and Hinson nails the accent. Turns out he’s a little too true to form and got his dumbass fired.

              Like

              • RangerRuss

                Goes to show, man, you don’t diss Dolly. Even when she’s uncharacteristically being wrong.

                Like

                • RangerRuss

                  I have great admiration for how and what Dolly has accomplished. The way she treated Porter Wagoner, her dogged determination to succeed and loyalty to her normal contractor husband are laudable. But in this controversy she’s simply wrong. UH missed a perfect chance to shut the fuck up. Another victim of social media and foot-in-mouth disease.

                  Like

                • Got Cowdog

                  IIUC she was asked a question and voiced her opinion (right or wrong) then he attacked her personally for it. Typical of the times…

                  Like

                • RangerRuss

                  Aight, Uncle Got. I never liked the pre-WW1 feed systems of most bolt action rifles. I really dislike fumble fucking around under a scope. The Marines installed a Badger M5 detachable box magazine on their M40s. I’m going to see my smith tomorrow about installing something similar. Preferably a system that uses Magpul magazines as that’s what I employ on my other rifles.
                  I’m enjoying this rifle. Needs a suppressor, DBM and a sturdier scope mount and I’m in there, man.

                  Like

                • Got Cowdog

                  Pre WW1? All but the Enfield were spring and slide internal magazines with a stripper clip, right? Don’t get me started on what the Garand could have been with a detachable box… Oh, wait… 🙂
                  One rifle I’d love to take to the farm is an M-1 fitted for a scope.

                  Like

                • Got Cowdog

                  I’d like to try an Enfield, as well.

                  Like

                • RangerRuss

                  Those old heavy ass steel and walnut rifles are fine tools. However, the automatics have a tendency to walk high and a bit left during sustained precision fire, especially that “Garand with the box magazine”. I’m attempting to overcome the inherent degradation of accuracy of my Match M1A(M14) with the 700 while maintaining a sustained level of fire with added DBM. Rate of fire will just have have to suffer. This a first world range issue only.

                  Like

                • RangerRuss

                  Siskey and I were discussing the Corps switching to optics and abandoning initial training with iron sights. My main objection was that the optics would become wore out or otherwise rendered useless and then the fighters wouldn’t have the skills to revert back to old school sights.
                  I underestimated the Marines dedication to optics. They’re not only maintaining but improving and updating the quality of optics for all Marines. Supplementing and then replacing the fixed 4 power, 10-oz RCO(ACOG) with the variable 1-8 power, 2 lb SCO(VCOG) is ongoing. The United States Marine Corps is taking Basic Rifle Marksmanship into the 21st century and the only thing suffering is the ego of us old school shooters.
                  Get off my lawn!
                  I actually saw the benefit about ten years ago and switched to red dot(Aimpoint M2) piston driven, suppressed, short AR. Greatly improved my times and ability to move from target to target accurately. Sort of feels like I’m cheating. That’s the impetus behind my setting up a long range rifle. I don’t want to lose the old skills and that’s the best way to hone said skills. Instant feedback on steel plates.
                  Shooting is a perishable skill that require practice just as night fighting. I got a few hours sleep earlier in the evening and the moon is sinking behind the trees. Time to step out and watch for them damn comanches.

                  Like

                • Got Cowdog

                  I still shoot old school quite a bit (what with revolvers and lever guns) because it’s fun. One of my favorite shooters is a Rossi ’92 Winchester clone in .357. It’s got a buckhorn sight with a big shiny brass bead up front and with a little practice it shoots right quick. Keeping position on the sight while working the lever is a good exercise, that and trigger discipline at range with a bolt platform. I’ve had no formal training, but having learned on those types of rifles then moving to an AR? Amazing for a shooter like me. My AR is full sized with a 4x ACOG and it is ridiculously accurate. I can feel the action as it cycles and have all the slack out of the trigger when the bolt closes for extremely fast following shots. I also think the ability to do that comes from years of wing-shooting with a gas operated shotgun. It has the same feel.
                  I’m thinking seriously about adding an M1A. I like the shorty version with the dot, but not sure that takes full advantage of the round.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • RangerRuss

                  Yeeeeeah. ARs are amazingly easy to shoot accurately. Doesn’t kick like that A5 or even the Savage 99 .300 either. Feeling and hearing the buffer spring twang in your ear is an odd initial experience. I don’t even notice it after 42 years. That ACOG is cheating. Got to get one I reckon. If you ain’t cheating you ain’t trying…
                  Dad taught me to shoot on my great grand daddies ’92 Winchester .32-20 when I was fourteen. Soft shooting and accurate. Those buckhorn sights are fine and lend themselves to Tennessee elevation. According to Winchester’s records it was built in 1912. I’m the keeper of that nice old rifle and I’ll sell the damn thing to a responsible young man unless some of my nephews shape the fuck up. That’s how I’ve acquired a significant portion of my collection over the years. Old veterans with shitheads/hippies for children give me their cherished war trophies as they know I’ll take care of and appreciate them. Very few veterans I know personally hold me in contempt as some of the boys around here. I’ll be damned if I see this collection end up in a pawn shop.
                  We were terribly disappointed in the accuracy of the short M1A SOCOM and I think you would be also. The system simply wasn’t designed for a 16” barrel. Big Steve, retired E-8 with 21 years in the Corps, bought one, shot it, brought it to me and I couldn’t get any accuracy out of it. He sold it for a big profit after the Sandy Hook panic.
                  I’d never discourage anyone from buying an M1A. It’s a fine old system that easily rings steel at 500 yard with open sights. But there is a reason it had the shortest life as the US Military’s main battle rifle. The AR, when not being bastardized by the likes of McNamara, is a better overall system. The Marines aren’t reinventing the wheel with the M27. But it’s the pinnacle of line MBRs. I’m trying to keep up.
                  There are some 16” .308 ARs out there that are dead accurate and reliable even with a suppressor if they’re outfitted with an adjustable gas block. I recommend a POF Edge. Tough time to be buying weapons and ammo.

                  Like

                • Got Cowdog

                  I have plenty of both, but you can never have too many or too much. 🙂

                  Liked by 1 person

                • RangerRuss

                  Sometimes I think about selling my M1A as it has become a safe queen. Might take the 3rd Gen ART scope off and mount it on the 700. Can always put it back and gives me a reason to sight it in again. Last time I took it to the range I literally shot the eyes out of a police bandit target at 400 yds with first two cold shots. As the barrel warmed it rapidly became a Minute-Of-Body platform. Still accurate just not precise.
                  I may be missing my last and best chance to sell the Black Rifle segment of my collection. The Ds have made it clear they want all citizens disarmed of those evil weapons of war. When they outright ban them there won’t be any burying ’em, hiding ’em or saying you sold ’em. The letter agencies know who has what and they won’t bother to come get them. They figure that won’t end well and they’re probably correct. They will simply cancel your ass. Indict you, freeze your assets and impugn you to those who matter costing you your livelihood. They have experience with this re their butthole buddies at the IRS.
                  Hell, I used to fear writing publicly about this. I work intimately with one of the lettered agencies as a requirement for my business. I grew to trust a double-dipping, retired NCO employed there. We shared a couple of drinks of JWB upon his second retirement a few years ago. Sitting on my second story balcony, looking down my 150 yard straight driveway flanked by woods with clear shooting lanes, he laughed when I mentioned keeping a low profile.
                  “Russ, they know who you are, what you have and what you’re capable of. They’ll never come for your shit. But if they do get a hard-on for you then they’ll just JDAM your ass.”
                  Then he laughed again. I fail to see the humor.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • RangerRuss

                  Ol Zig Zag Zell said it best.
                  “I have more guns than I need but not near as many as I want.”

                  Like

                • Got Cowdog

                  I hate to admit I had to google JDAM. He’s not wrong. 🙂 If you think about it, 25k plus delivery is a much cheaper and more effective way to cancel a potential revolutionary than shooting it out. Just sayin’…
                  I don’t think the government will ever get to the “Turn in your weapon” point of what they consider “Assault Rifles”. If they do, they’ll do it just like you said. They’re not going to set the military and police to raiding owners homes, confiscating weapons, setting up opportunities for shootouts ala Norco and LA with otherwise law abiding civilians. They’ll send you a notice where you can take it and when, if the serial number doesn’t get crossed off you get frozen. But even at that some will chose not to cooperate and that’s a big ol’ dangerous hassle ala Ruby Ridge and Waco aannd a bad optic for Big Government. Nah…
                  What will happen is they’ll ban trade and manufacture of certain weapons based on certain parameters with extremely severe penalties for offenses. It makes it look like they’ve done something without causing open revolt. Something like the Brady bill with sharper teeth.
                  And being realistic, the JDAM made me think: I get the “They can have my gun when they pry my cold dead fingers from around it” thing. Fact of the matter is, they can and they will. You served in an elite unit. How much chance will a civilian or group of civilians stand when the Government decides to send the pros?

                  Liked by 1 person

                • RangerRuss

                  I giggled out loud thinking of what would happen to some shitheads who came rolling up while I’m on Comanche watch. If it’s criminals? Woe be unto them. I been walking this property and know where all the dead space and cover is. I simply don’t miss at these ranges. If it’s gooberment boys? What are you gonna do? Make a widow of a few young ladies? For what? The end result is going to be the same. I’d have to fuck with them a little bit though. Maybe join their stack and ask a few questions. Give a few suggestions.
                  “I heard this psycho muthafka has trip wired claymores lacing his lawn. Who brought the silly string?”
                  They ought to require the ones trying to pass this unconstitutional chicken shit lead the assault. Same for some of these democracy building crusades. We’d see if it’s such a good idea then.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • Got Cowdog

                  Exactly. Being able to defend home and hearth by any and all means is what I consider the whole 2nd to be about, up to and including the ability to take up arms and DEFEND my country. Do I care to mix it up with Uncle Sam’s finest over a freedom to own a particular weapon? Nah. to quote Animal Mother: “Freedom? If I’m gonna die for a word, that word is…Poontang”.
                  You and I should meet up for a JWB or two someday. I’d love to hear the stories. Bring your new toy, I think I can squeeze 800 meters out depending on where I put the target rack…

                  Liked by 1 person

                • RangerRuss

                  Oh hell yes. I’ll allow you to be the wind dummy on that Lithgow Enfield MK III that was gifted to me. I’ve cleaned it up and never fired it. Got some surplus British .303 ammo that should function. Maybe I can find some modern rounds on the mostly empty shelves at Academy or the LGS. It appears from the faded paint numbers on the stock to have been a training weapon.
                  I have friends ringing iron maidens regularly at a 1,000 yd range on the Broad River. Doesn’t make a lot of sense to me. The 168gr I shoot goes subsonic just under 800 yards. Gets wobbly past that. Also you have to start wedging up your scope. I’d be more comfortable at 600 yds. As an aside, I won’t shoot a deer even at 300 yards. Too easy to fuck it up and wound the animal. I’m reeeeal happy to shoot ’em at 35 yds right next to my single tree and cleaning station. Yeah, that’s where I scatter the corn most mornings. I don’t like dragging dead animals 100yds. If you ain’t cheating you ain’t trying…
                  We will get together for a libation or three. Maybe a beer or two while shooting. It’ll be about three months before I get the 700 back from my smith. I’ll bring everything we need except your ear and eye protection. I have portable dual iron maidens that hang in at a 13 degree angle forcing the spalling downward. Guns n ammo also. If you don’t mind Corona you’re welcome to that also. I know you’ll like the Scotch. I’ll make Horndog Hans drive, that sober bastard. He’s good company and an excellent manservant.
                  Keep this in mind. It’ll be awhile but we can make it happen Cap’n.

                  Like

                • Got Cowdog

                  They’d never notice you in their stack, LOL. I’d try it as the neighbor…”That fucker’s crazy… who brought the silly string?”
                  My “High Tech” target is a unistrut bridge with 24″ square OSB hanging on chains. I’ll paint the dot whatever size I want to hit at range. It doesn’t ring as much as shiver but it breaks down in a couple of minutes and I can move it all over. Give me a heads up, The Senator has my email…

                  Liked by 1 person

    • I do like Teen Titans GO! I think the humor is geared just as much towards the parents’ generation as it my kids’.

      Like

  17. Ozam

    What’s classical music? 🙂

    Like

  18. We can’t have nice things.

    Like

  19. Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon is an absolute masterpiece in rock/pop and will stand the test of time. I would bet MONEY, on it.

    Liked by 2 people

    • RangerRuss

      I see what you did there, DudeMankind. And you can’t fool me. I know you’re really Mick Foley behind those tie-dye shirts and leather mask, lurking in those boiler rooms.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. otto1980

    Looney Tunes wasn’t just classical music but international cuisine. Hasenpfeffer!!

    We were such cultured kids who knew not to run off a cliff.

    Like

  21. spur21

    Basil Poledouris comes to my mind when I think of modern classical composers. His scores paint a picture – if you close your eyes and allow yourself to drift. Well that’s my opinion and I’m sticking with it. Who else mixes big brass with a freaking banjo?

    Like

  22. DawgFlan

    Those of you with young kids like me should be familiar with Bluey, it’s an Australian cartoon for toddlers. The music features re-arranged classical tunes. I recommend the episode “Sleepytime” to everyone if you can stream it, which features Holst’s The Planets throughout. The “Magic Xylophone” episode is one that is available on youtube @ minute 7 of this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJkn-r-rJJY&t=21s

    Yes on Looney Tunes as my introduction the classical music. I distinctly remember Bugs Bunny in “Rabbit of Seville” and Jerry conducting Strauss’s “Overture to die Fledermaus” as Tom ran scrambled. And the “pigs in a Polka” made me laugh again this morning.

    As for the iconic music of the 20th century, people seem split on if the question regards orchestral composers like Copland, Gershwin, Holst, Stravinsky, Shostakovich and the like, or if the question pertains to guitar-based music as the instrument of the 20th Century, like Dylan, Lennon, McCartney, Berry, Paul Simon, Joni Mitchell. Still on piano, but Elton John’s songs have staying power. But my personal #1 would be Stevie Wonder.

    Like

  23. Yes and no.
    Right now “classical” can encompass an old Handel piece for Harpsichord, and Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue, and even atonal stuff like “Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima” and…yeah the instrumentation is orchestral. But musically? they’re wildly different.
    Same with calling something “jazz” — you include old big band standards and really loud stuff like Mahavishnu Orchestra.

    But among non-20th century classical names that will be taught down the line?
    A few I think make the cut
    Beatles and George Martin — huge on taking pop music from “record the band” to using the studio as an instrument, and making the LP it’s own work.
    Frank Zappa — prolific and influenced by a lot of classical composers
    Charles Mingus –

    But also I think a big difference from pre-20th century music and now is it’s far easier to hear music than it was — either live or recorded — so I think actually a lot more names/genres could carry own with proper archiving

    Like

  24. rigger92

    I’m a ‘70’s and 80’s kid and I grew up on these cartoons and the music did make a real impression on me. I was a trumpet player and majored in music with the goal of being in an orchestra. I subbed with the ASO and Charleston few times but never landed a “chair” anywhere, except with the Army Field Band.

    What gets me is the adaptations used in these cartoons. Compared to the actual piece, the cartoon versions are like sonic gymnastics. Listen to the “Jetson’s” theme, it’s just wild. The studio musicians of that era were amazing.

    One thing about modern “classics” that stand the test of time is that most of the mentioned artists and works aren’t really written down. Chord charts and words, same with Jazz. I really dig the Miles Davis, Louis Armstrong eras and a lot of that is written down with normal music notation. I also really enjoy Pat Metheny but I can’t imagine how his music could be written down either.

    Like

  25. Ralph Freeman

    Joni Mitchell and Richard Thompson.

    Like

  26. Teacher Martin

    Just like I’ve always said. Something will always happen. It’s the Georgia Way.

    Like

    • Got Cowdog

      By Dawg we have a winner.
      You let a teenage boy in 2200 listen to “Little Deuce Coupe” then ” Help Me Rhonda”? It’s visceral for that age…
      I miss that

      Liked by 1 person

  27. Raleighwood Dawg

    Shortest playpen ever?

    Like