You had one job, people.

If you’re unhappy with what you perceive to be the chaos about to be inflicted on college football with the proliferation of NIL legislation sweeping throughout the various states, remember where the blame lies.

The members, of course, including the very schools now pushing their legislatures to create laws so as not to fall behind in the recruiting arms race.  Talk about reaping what you sow.  Well played, folks.

37 Comments

Filed under Political Wankery, The NCAA

37 responses to “You had one job, people.

  1. J.R. Clark

    LOL at the idea of academics and bureaucrats coming together to get anything done that needs to be urgently accomplished. Academics and bureaucrats schedule meetings to discuss scheduling further meetings.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Harold Miller

      How dare you. They schedule meetings to settle to itinerary for the schedule meeting meeting. Get it right!

      Like

  2. Derek

    I wonder if the ncaa repeatedly asked: “well, we see your point on NLI but where can we draw a line, i.e., craft a rule, that makes sense and prevents pretty obvious risks for abuse and excess” and were told not to worry about it, no lines are necessary and everything will be just fine without them, but now those same people come back say: “well why didn’t you go ahead and draw a line, huh!? What were you thinking!?!?”

    IF that were the history, those previously asking the questions, raising alarms and trying to build consensus around a workable, agreeable solution to these issues might well call bullshit right about now.

    Like

    • I hate to crap on your narrative, but people have been pushing on the NCAA to be proactive on this front for years, both inside the organization and outside. You shouldn’t mistake paralysis for some sort of careful consideration of the issue.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Derek

        I said IF.

        I don’t know.

        I recall someone I know trying….repeatedly… and failing to get any suggested fixes or even a hint of any hesitation that there was a thing to be concerned with with NLI.

        Why would we expect the ncaa to have had any different experience IF they had tried?

        The question I pose is: do the people who said “don’t worry, this is fine and all will be fine forever. Don’t worry, be happy” and what not now get to now point fingers and say: well you should have stopped our nonsense when you had the chance?!?

        Our can they at least just own it now and be responsible for the consequences? After all they said there wouldn’t be any to worry about.

        When you propose something, disregard warnings, often impatiently, sometimes suggesting the person issuing the warnings is being obtuse and then when you get what you want you say “well if this all goes terrible wrong well then its your fault, you should have stopped me so I didn’t get what I asked for” my reaction is:

        Bullshit.

        Like

        • 79dawg

          I mean, its not like the politicians who are now passing these laws to give athletes these “rights” are [looks around furtively], the same politicians who appoint the Regents, who select the University Presidents, who hire the athletic directors and govern the NCAA….
          At any time in the past decade, these same politicians could’ve told the Regents and University Presidents, leave the NCAA, form a new association to pay the players, etc.
          The NCAA only has as much power as its constituents gave it, and unfortunately the “haves” lumped so many “have nots” into the NCAA (i.e., all the schools in I-AA, and Divisions II and III), that they have no juice. The “haves” could have addressed this issue (and many others) a long time ago if they had just departed en masse, but for some reason, they lacked the cojones to do so (my bet is that the same politicians who just passed this new law and represent areas where the smaller schools are, would have been blasting the big, greedy universities for leaving). And at the same time, the University Presidents and Administrators didn’t want to actually have to admit that they were running semi-pro football and basketball teams, but these new laws give them “cover” to pretend that they are still actually running educational institutions.
          So spare us all the “its the NCAA’s fault” routine – it is and remains simply a smokescreen to distract from the true realities of the situation…. It is the schools’ own fault for allowing their educational institutions to be dominated by semi-pro football and basketball teams, instead of having those teams be an actual part of, and subservient to, the university. That is the real reaping and sowing….

          Liked by 1 person

    • mddawg

      Who do you think are the stakeholders who would’ve told the NCAA not to worry about NIL? The O’Bannon lawsuit was filed in 2009, ruled on in 2014. They’ve had plenty of time to adress this issue, and even ample warning that these state-led NIL laws were coming down the pike. I’m not sure how it could be characterized as anything but a complete failure to lead on this issue. If they were making any progress on the issue before being preempted by the states, then it’s a complete PR failure.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Derek

        I’m simply saying that IF they tried their experience may have been as frustrating as my own:

        1) People denying there was anything to worry about with NLI income.
        2) People refusing to come up with ANY language that would allow the “good” NLI income that we all were for while disallowing the “bad” NLI income the proponents pretended couldn’t happen.
        3) People stating non sequiturs like: they’re already getting paid!
        4) People lobbing insults.
        5) Repeat steps 1-4.

        Having repeatedly been through that wash the last thing I want to hear from proponents is any washing of their hands of the coming consequences.

        My read is that the ncaa knew that their rules could not be enforced as written in this environment AND that it lacked the legal authority to police NLI without being in court forever. I think the plan is:

        If the rules as written had merit and wisdom, the wheel of history will turn back its way in due time.

        If the rules were always unnecessary, then fine. We move on.

        Given the complete intransigence of the proponents, I can see why they went that way.

        Like

        • mddawg

          Are you suggesting that Mark Emmert and the NCAA brain trust told their member institutions “we’ve got to do something about NIL” and the school administrators responded with items 1-4 that you listed above? If so, I sure hope someone got a recording of an Athletic Director saying “they’re already getting paid!”

          Like

          • Derek

            Are you saying you have to look up the word “if?”

            I capitalized it for fuck’s sake.

            The analogy is to what I did on this blog in asking questions.

            I don’t know what the ncaa did which is apparent once you find a Webster’s and go to the “I’s”.

            Like

            • mddawg

              Are you saying you didn’t read my comments where I used the word “if” several times myself? Get the “if” out of here with that “s”.

              The fact that you even have to wonder what, if anything, the NCAA did about the NIL speaks volumes about the organization.

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              • Derek

                Only IF some proponent of limited, or the “good kind” of, NLI were willing to offer language that would fix the issue and withstand a court challenge can one complain about the organization doing nothing. The problem as I continue to put in front of blind eyes is that there is no fix. If there were, someone would have proposed it. Perhaps even here. After one of dozens of requests that someone offer language that works.

                Once you let them earn on their NLI the floodgates are opened and there does not seem to be any fix at all. The problem isn’t the organization. The problem is the problem.

                Don’t think so?

                Write out the rule that allows “good” NLI income and not “bad” NLI income.

                Give it a shot.

                Like

                • mddawg

                  Nah, I think I’ll pass. I don’t have to be able to fix the issue in order to say the people that get paid to fix this type of issue should’ve done a better job.

                  Like

                • Derek

                  Its so easy anyone could do it but me so fuck those guys cuz they didn’t and stuff.

                  Its an ethos….

                  Like

  3. If I didn’t know better, I’d say the NCAA is an antiquated, incompetent cartel that sucks at the very mission they ostensibly exist for.

    Liked by 6 people

  4. Hogbody Spradlin

    One can only speculate about what motivates people and groups, but it’s not a far stretch to think that the NCAA did nothing because of its oblivious belief that “The Way of The Amateur” would prevail. One thinks of Baghdad Bob, or Chip Diller trampled into the sidewalk.
    Some of the most wrongheaded, mediocre organizational behavior I’ve seen in a while, and that’s a pretty crowded field. And they’re supposed to be the smart people dontcha know.

    Like

    • No one I know of thinks of the NCAA as even supposedly smart. They only vaguely even try to present themselves at that.

      They are the assembled group that does the bidding for the member institutions: namely keep the money from getting to the labor and kept the universities exempt from having to provide Work Comp coverage.

      That was their founding purpose and principle and they have never strayed too far from home. All the rest is just a PR stunt to hide why they real exist.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. The NCAA completely miscalculated how the public and state governments were going to react their complete mishandling of the O’Bannon and Alston lawsuits. That alone should have been enough for the Board of Governors to send Mark Emmert packing.

    Like

    • Who knows what they were calculating, but the public attitude on player compensation, empowerment, etc. is significantly different from where it was even a decade ago.

      Maybe the NCAA thought they could win the PR argument enough that they could ward off whatever legal ground they lost.

      At any rate, they are an unnecessary cartel at this point whose days are clearly numbered.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Derek

        You underestimate the value that the people who are the REAL stakeholders place in having a scapegoat to do its bidding for them with near total deniability.

        Like

        • 79dawg

          Exactly, as can be seen from this comment thread where so many sheeple continue to act as if the NCAA is the “bad guy” and the schools, administrators, “helpful” politicians, etc., have the noblest goals at heart….
          I mean, if the NCAA is a “cartel”, that makes Georgia a member of the cartel! Does that anyone the warm and fuzzies on the inside??? Anyone???

          Like

          • UGA is a member of the cartel. Not sure if you thought I was insinuating otherwise, but I am not.

            Every single member institution is complicit.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Derek

              but the ncaa is done?

              You sure about that?

              Even if it is, it will be replaced by some other similar entity to take shots for the big pocket folks. They got money to count.

              Like

              • I’m not a fortune teller, but yes, I think it’s done. I think each conference will likely be it’s own governing body for the member institutions and then the conferences will negotiate with each other.

                That might not be a better mousetrap mind you, but I don’t see how an institution as universally disliked as the NCAA survives in the modern era of marketing, branding, compensation, etc, etc, etc.

                Like

                • Derek

                  So you’re a fan of the sec office in Birmingham?

                  Like

                • I’m not playing this game with you.

                  The question isn’t whether we think Birmingham is corrupt, it’s whether we think Indianapolis is competent.

                  If defending the NCAA is the hill you want to die on, Godspeed.

                  Like

                • Derek

                  Unfortunately, due to a combination of time, biology and an unlucky tear in the matrix, I’m going to die on hill surrounded by morons.

                  And I have a sense of what they’re up to….

                  One set of asshats will be replaced by another set of asshats, if at all. The ncaa did nothing more or less than what it’s membership wanted it to do or not do. The membership isn’t changing or getting any better with or without the ncaa.

                  Shoot goodell. A new goodell will magically appear as if the nfl owners have a gd clone machine. And they’ll pay him 25 million a year to do their bidding for them.

                  Like

  6. W Cobb Dawg

    So how much money do we think players are going to get via the NIL? I suppose a couple players per team, and a handful of players on the national level, might cash in with significant amounts. But I’m not sure the vast majority of players will see anything at all.

    Some people freaked out about utk and aubie having stipends about $2,000 above UGA’s. It all turned out to be essentially nothing.

    Like

    • unionjackgin

      I would take these numbers with a grain of salt since the research estimate comes from a company that wants to be the marketing agency for these athletes but …

      “Listed below are the combined Twitter and Instagram follower counts for the 20 most-followed players, plus their estimated annual earnings, provided to Axios by athlete marketing platform Opendorse.”

      Top 20:

      🚺 Paige Bueckers, UConn: ~730k ($382k)
      🚺 Hailey Van Lith, Louisville: 696k ($965k)
      🚹 Jalen Suggs, Gonzaga: 325k ($495k)
      🚺 Jaden Owens, Baylor: 295k ($310k)
      🚺 Zia Cooke, South Carolina: 206k ($178k)
      🚺 Cameron Brink, Stanford: 91k ($47k)
      🚹 Adrian Nunez, Michigan: 83k ($70k)
      🚺 Anna Wilson, Stanford: 80k ($41k)
      🚺 Olivia Nelson-Ododa, UConn: 77k ($30k)
      🚺 Brea Beal, South Carolina: 74k ($69k)
      🚹 Quentin Grimes, Houston: 66k ($67k)
      🚺 Destanni Henderson, South Carolina: 65k ($81k)
      🚹 Evan Mobley, USC: 62k ($46k)
      🚹 Johnny Juzang, UCLA: 55k ($53k)
      🚹 Tyger Campbell, UCLA: 54k ($59k)
      🚹 Moses Moody, Arkansas: 50k ($72k)
      🚹 Drew Timme, Gonzaga: 49k ($40k)
      🚹 Hunter Dickinson, Michigan: 49k ($33k)
      🚹 Jaylen Clark, UCLA: 49k ($38k)
      🚺 Caitlin Clark, Iowa: 42k ($11k)

      I am a firm believer that the women on gymnastics teams like UGA, Alabama, UF, UCLA, Utah, Oklahoma, are going to make a nice amount annually. I also believe that while most kids won’t make the high dollar amounts, there is enough of a market that even athletes in non-monetary sports will be able to monetize at some level.

      I really don’t see the motivation for this whole “pool” concept or why funds would need to be put in escrow. Unless it is some hedge for future collective bargaining agreements?

      Liked by 1 person

  7. 123 Fake St

    If you can name JT Daniels’, Jordan Davis’, and Kearis Jackson’s major, I’ll believe you that you care about student-athletes.
    If you can’t, then you shouldn’t worry about these young men making money off of their own name.
    Go Dawgs!

    Like

  8. 69Dawg

    Let the games begin. Drew Butler is into it with both feet. He involved with one company that is already to sign up players.

    Like