Today, in doing it for the kids

You, an amateurism romantic:  Scholarships are fair value for college athletes!  Besides, think of what compensation for football players will do to scholarship athletes in non-revenue sports!

They, every P5 athletic department:

One day, business schools across the country are going to use the NCAA and schools as the perfect model to teach class after class how not to promote successful business PR.

14 Comments

Filed under College Football

14 responses to “Today, in doing it for the kids

  1. classiccitycanine

    Great point! That should hammer the last nail in the coffin of the argument against NIL.

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  2. 79dawg

    It’s actually been great PR – they have been able to get away with the scam and pocket the money for the past 30+ years!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Agreed. They’ve promoted this “its for the kids, pay no attention to the barrel of money being deposited in our bank accounts” for 30 years now. Only question is, how bad will the backlash be once people clearly see what kind of scam this is?

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  3. Tommy Perkins

    As a b-school grad, I’m not sure what’s useful to MBAs about pre-2021 NCAA and college athletic departments. Like everything else in higher ed, they operate in the kind of free-money environments that most businesses don’t enjoy, and which don’t lend themselves to rational economic behavior.

    But, to play the thread out a little further, not putting their money where their mouths are is more than merely a PR blunder. It’s a lesson in how not to manage a portfolio that includes a cash cow business (football). Alas, in the gravity-defying business model of college athletics, that lesson may only end up validating The Georgia Way (TM), as I don’t know where else you could productively deploy football’s enormous free cash flows, the way Amazon or Apple can with profits from the iPhone or Amazon Web Services. Yes, standing up enough sports to compete with Stanford and Berkeley in the Director’s Cup would be great for fans and student-athletes, but there’s not an economic case to go with it.

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    • Tommy Perkins

      Which is to say, lacrosse or water polo aren’t going to become profit centers no matter how much football profit you invest in those sports.

      Liked by 1 person

      • stoopnagle

        …and when you’re governed by educational values, it doesn’t matter. These institutions are supposed to be about opportunity. LOL.

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        • Tommy Perkins

          Right. Theoretically, this would be a good case to study in an M.Ed program, where people care about things like managing in an institution responsibly enough that you can create sustainable opportunities for students (regardless of whether those opportunities are profitable to the school).

          But in reality, college athletic departments are just tax-exempt businesses that haven’t thought in those terms for decades. Which is such an obviously untenable position that I’m amazed it’s taken this long for it to unravel. To be a fly on the wall at a sports management program.

          Liked by 1 person

          • jcdawg83

            I think college athletics in general would make a great case study in a political science class to show how government programs work. The vast majority of college athletic departments and football programs lose money every year and the shortfall is made up by charging all students “athletic fees” regardless of whether or not the student cares at all about athletics. This model is identical to the govt model that takes money from individuals by force in the form of taxes and spends it on programs that not everyone benefits from or even cares about in any way.

            The amount of the coaches’ salaries or the expenditure amounts on facilities for a particular sport are simply examples of which programs the powers that be decide to focus on. At Kentucky, basketball is the program driving the athletic department while football is the leader in Athens.

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      • rugbydawg79

        Maybe Rugby one day.

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        • classiccitycanine

          I watched some Olympic Rugby last night and thought, “Hey! I could get into this if head trauma ever makes football go away.”

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        • 69Dawg

          If we get rugby, I’m for the National Rugby League game from down under.
          13 players instead of 15 a scum that is fast and not even necessary. It is so much faster than the old Primer type. It is non-stop action and the ball actually changes hands after 4 tackles/ 5 plays no matter how many yards you gain. I recorded the whole season last year and I’m into it this year.
          Rugby I’m interested in your thoughts on this game.

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  4. MGW

    The Northwestern thing is what cracks me up. From top to bottom, every single program has blown millions of dollars in the name of “competitive advantage” and every single program is roughly exactly where they were when this whole thing started.

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