Daily Archives: May 4, 2022

Butts-Mehre isn’t missing any meals.

I think it was a couple of weeks ago that I took note that Georgia was tardy publishing its athletic department financials for the past fiscal year.  Welp, AirForceDawg has done the digging so I don’t need to and finds those numbers are now out.

Here’s a pictorial representation of B-M’s fiscal 2021:

Uncle Scrooge Money GIFs | Tenor

Or, if you prefer, here’s how the SEC’s numbers stack up on athletic department revenues minus expenses, per AFD.

1. UGA: $55,823,857
2. Arkansas: $21,299,534
3. Ole Miss: $17,631,145
4. Texas A&M: $15,254,238
5. Tennessee: $11,229,051
6. Alabama: $9,607,849
7. South Carolina: $4,792,677
8. Vanderbilt: $3,261,949
9. Kentucky: $539,020
10. Auburn/Florida/LSU/Missouri: $0

Georgia’s net is more than the next three schools combined.  That is crazy.  One big thing driving the net is Georgia continues to be one of the more frugal programs in the conference.  Here’s the order, by expense:

1. Alabama: $147,454,823
2. South Carolina: $130,364,710
3. Auburn: $128,356,495
4. Florida: $124,429,950
5. Texas A&M: $121,604,428
6. Tennessee: $117,865,373
7. Kentucky: $114,284,364
8. LSU: $113,987,809
9. UGA: $113,240,799
10. Arkansas: $111,513,940
11. Vanderbilt: $98,162,624
12. Ole Miss: $95,080,917
13. Missouri: $83,177,451
14. Mississippi State: $82,764,165

I think the reserve fund’s covered.  Snark aside, this goes back to a point I made yesterday — if Georgia has to put serious resources into NIL compensation to keep up with the market, it’s well positioned to do that.

34 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, It's Just Bidness

So much for Billy Napier’s honeymoon

Florida signs a JUCO offensive lineman whose other offers were from Arkansas State, Houston, Incarnate Word and Missouri State and the reaction at Swamp247?

Let’s just say the bloom is coming off the rose.  Especially after they learn he’s not coming in as a preferred walk-on.

That gap’s gonna close any day now.

30 Comments

Filed under Gators, Gators..., Recruiting

That’s billion, with a “B”

The Big Ten’s makin’ dollah, y’all.

Big Ten commissioner Kevin Warren expects to have an agreement in place on a new media rights deal for the conference in about one month’s time, he told CBS Sports on Monday.

The new deal, which would begin in 2023, could be worth a record-setting $1 billion per season, according to Sports Business Journal, which reported that Fox Sports already has a deal in place to renew its part of the deal.

What does that translate into per team?  This:

A $1 billion annual deal would project to an average of $71 million per school, per year. For now, that would be a record.

“For now”.  As in, wait to see what Sankey is able to renegotiate once Oklahoma and Texas join the SEC.  In any event, these two conferences are on the verge of lapping the field on the money front for at least the rest of the decade.

10 Comments

Filed under Big Ten Football, It's Just Bidness

Mo’ rat poison

A couple of quotes for your morning pleasure:

Georgia’s defense itself had more first round picks than the entire Pac-12 (4) or ACC (3).

“It’s like one-stop shopping down there,” Philadelphia Eagles executive vice president and general manager Howie Roseman, who drafted nose guard Jordan Davis in the first round and linebacker Nakobe Dean in the third, told reporters. “You go to practice. You go to a game. You go to that facility and you’re going, shoot I’ll just go draft this whole team.”

“They might have three or four NFL players on defense next season, instead of five or six,” one SEC head coach said. “They’ve still got more than almost everyone else.”

That’s the sound reloading makes, my friends.

15 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football

“We let things get out of hand.”

Man, it was all the way back to *** checks notes *** yesterday when I posted this observation:

If there’s one thing that really surprises me about the new landscape, it’s how passive head coaches, surely among the world’s greatest control freaks, have been about letting boosters run rampant.

Well, lookee here.

College leaders are gearing up to issue a warning to hundreds of wealthy boosters who are using name, image and likeness (NIL) ventures to involve themselves in recruiting.

University administrators, part of a task force to review NIL, are finalizing additional guidelines that are expected to clarify that boosters and booster-led collectives are prohibited from involvement in recruiting, multiple sources tell Sports Illustrated. The guidelines will provide more guidance to member schools on what many administrators say are NIL-disguised “pay for play” deals orchestrated by donors to induce prospects, recruit players off other college teams and retain their own athletes.

The new directives will highlight existing NCAA bylaws that outlaw boosters from participating in recruiting, reminding member schools of guardrails that, while in place for years, have been bent and broken during the first 10 months of the NIL era, officials say. Under a long-held NCAA rule, boosters are a representative arm of an athletic department and are not supposed to associate with or persuade prospects.

The guidelines, still in draft form, outline that booster-backed collectives should be prohibited from associating with high school prospects and college transfers, potentially opening the door for contentious legal challenges between the association and booster groups.

My first thought upon hearing about that was to laugh.  The NCAA wants to wade back into treacherous legal waters over player compensation?  Talk about your definition of insanity.

Then I started thinking about it a little more.  Maybe there’s a way to come up with an approach that has some enforceable teeth to it.  The trick would be to focus on punishing boosters, not players.  And that kind of sounds like this:

The new directives will highlight existing NCAA bylaws that outlaw boosters from participating in recruiting, reminding member schools of guardrails that, while in place for years, have been bent and broken during the first 10 months of the NIL era, officials say. Under a long-held NCAA rule, boosters are a representative arm of an athletic department and are not supposed to associate with or persuade prospects.

The guidelines, still in draft form, outline that booster-backed collectives should be prohibited from associating with high school prospects and college transfers, potentially opening the door for contentious legal challenges between the association and booster groups.

Schools that do not control their donors’ spending could be found to have violated NCAA rules and will be sanctioned, according to the document.

Spending eight million dollars on a recruit who will never throw a pass in anger in a playoff game because his team is banned from it seems like a major waste of money, even for a booster who sincerely believes his shit doesn’t stink.  But, even if the NCAA doesn’t punish the recruit, do boosters have enough legal juice to thwart enforcement?

Any NCAA enforcement will challenge state NIL laws and risk a bevy of lawsuits from the wealthy collectives and individual donors, experts say.

“Either you let everyone do it or you enforce the rule,” Florida-based sports attorney Darren Heitner says. “In essence, what’s happening or will happen is those who are willing to violate the rule will be rewarded if nothing is done about it. Don’t have a rule if you’re not willing to enforce it. This isn’t a matter of them not being able to do something. But will it further open itself up to more litigation, litigation it will probably lose?”

Sounds like we’re going to find out.  Boosters suing their schools certainly has a weird vibe to it, but so does this:

“I have some coaches call me and say, ‘I don’t know what to do about this booster because he’s offering all these kids NIL money and I don’t even want the kid’,'” shared Todd Berry, executive director of the American Football Coaches Association.

The NCAA had best find better lawyers than they had the last time they were in court.

14 Comments

Filed under See You In Court, The NCAA

The portal pushback, she is beginning.

You knew something would be coming.

College football coaches will propose transfer windows in the late fall and spring to help with roster management around the transfer portal.

Todd Berry, executive director of the American Football Coaches Association, said Tuesday his group would like two transfer windows for players to enter their names in the portal: one from the final Sunday in November until the early signing date in mid-December, and another from April 15 to May 1. Both windows would coincide with contact periods in recruiting. Players wouldn’t be required to transfer, only to enter the portal during designated time periods.

The NCAA’s transfer portal, which debuted in October 2018, currently doesn’t have specific windows for movement. The only deadline is that players must notify schools that they are entering the portal by May 1 of each academic year. Berry noted that AFCA members proposed transfer windows before the portal went into effect, but they have not been adopted.

Assuming it’s adopted, I have no idea how it shakes out, but, given this comment…

“We’re working on a window concept that I think is going to be very good for the student-athlete, to give them those opportunities, and to provide the universities and their team and teammates with a little bit more clarity on positions and recruiting and those kinds of things.”

… I can guess who stands to benefit the most.  After all, there’s no bigger tell in college athletics than doing it for the kids.

7 Comments

Filed under Transfers Are For Coaches.

Look who’s serving the rat poison du jour

PAWWWLLL!!!

The ESPN personality also gave his thoughts on who the best program in the country is.

And fresh off a national championship and 15 players selected in the 2022 NFL draft; Finebaum believes Georgia holds the crown.

What Thursday really was, ended up being the final cherry on top of the cake for Kirby Smart and Georgia. I mean, it was a defining moment for Georgia’s program — as the national championship was — but this confirmed it. … It’s remarkable and I think, now, hopefully, people will give Kirby Smart the credit that he deserves as a builder and as a developer — and, obviously, as a head coach.

Finebaum also noted players such as Justin Fields, Cade May and Jermaine Johnson III that transferred out of Athens; but still walked through those turnstiles at one point.

It’s hard to argue, after this past weekend, that Georgia doesn’t have the best overall program in the country — and I’m not talking about a moment in time, the winner of the championship. Too often, we do that. I’m talking about — look at who has the best program in college football right now. You can make an argument it’s the University of Georgia.

Gotta make sure he’s got fresh fodder for the ‘Bama fans who call into his show, I guess.

9 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, PAWWWLLL!!!