Category Archives: BCS/Playoffs

So much for that New Year’s Eve tradition

Bill Hancock, tower of Jello:

… In January 2013, when the CFP announced the 12-year schedule, they touted the idea of tripleheaders on consecutive days, and of taking New Year’s Eve for college football. Hancock said nothing has changed.

Next year, New Year’s Eve falls on a Saturday. And in the fourth year, the semifinals will again be played in the Rose and Sugar bowls on New Year’s Day.

“We are committed to this,” he said, adding: “Two years does not make a trend. Let’s watch this. Let’s see what happens.”

Of course, the question is whether people will watch — whether college football’s postseason eventually will become part of New Year’s Eve tradition.

“We had some bum luck with the lack of competitive games,” Hancock said. “Things would have been different with competitive games. How much different, nobody knows.

“We’re very confident that every year will be different and over time these games will be ingrained into a part of the New Year’s Eve tradition.”

Some disappointing TV ratings later, and the tune is changing.

If there’s one thing you can count on with regard to college football’s postseason, it’s the suits panicking when the viewers don’t show up.

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An eight-team playoff is coming.

Bill Hancock moved his lips again.

College Football Playoff executive director Bill Hancock reiterated that the CFP has no plans to expand beyond its four-team format.

Alabama won the second CFP national championship.

“There’s no discussion of expanding,” Hancock said. “We set the four-team tournament for 12 years and there’s no discussion in our group about any kind of expansion.”

I almost wish they’d get it over with already, just so he can move on to his next line of bullshit.

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One man’s “What’s the point?” is another’s “Just shoot me”.

Why you gotta bring me down like that, Ed Aschoff?

You simply can’t fight change. Doing so is foolish. That’s one reason the SEC has been so successful during the past decade. Those eight national championships in 10 years didn’t just materialize overnight. Careful planning and excellent business sense from league officials, universities and coaches have helped the SEC rise above the rest in college football.

Thanks to the skillful mind of former SEC commissioner Mike Slive, the SEC has stayed ahead of the curve for most of the 2000’s. New commissioner Greg Sankey is in the infancy of his reign as league commissioner, but if he wants to give the SEC another leg up on the competition, he could take a radical step into future planning.

Petition the NCAA to get rid of divisions in college football … even though the SEC created them in 1992.

Honestly, what’s the point? They are outdated, and hurt the conference more than help it.

And why so?

Elimination of divisions would also ensure that the two best teams would play in Atlanta every year. The West has won seven straight conference titles, six by 14 points or more. Florida (2008) is the last East team to win the conference. Let’s not act like there hasn’t been an imbalance of power in the SEC, thanks to divisions. There is an obvious disparity, creating more worry for teams and their true playoff hopes…

Nothing wrong with getting the most competitive game possible in your most important game every year by guaranteeing No. 1 vs. No. 2, which — wait for it — increases playoff hopes even more!

The SEC’s won, what, eight of the last ten national titles… so I guess if there were no divisions, it would have been a clean sweep.

At some point, my insistence that an expanded postseason is going to dilute the most unique thing college football has going for it, the most meaningful regular season in American sports, is going to resonate more generally.  When?  Well, if you ask Aschoff, probably ten years from now.

Cherish these days, SEC fans, because in 10 years you won’t recognize your league.

Another wave of expansion will hit and with the College Football Playoff expanding to at least eight teams within the next decade (sooner rather than later if the NCAA is smart), the SEC will go to nine conference games. The league finally will get rid of divisions (you’re welcome, Auburn and Missouri) and crown its winner by having an outright champion.

What, no SEC title game? Well, once the playoff expands (thank you) and the SEC moves to nine conference games, coaches will let their athletic directors and presidents know that they aren’t going to want to play more than 12 games before the playoff. Makes sense, so you either eliminate a nonconference game or the championship games. Less nonconference games hurts the smaller schools and since championship games affect fewer teams, buh-bye.

Gosh, I feel better already.  ‘Scuse me while I kiss the brackets.

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Filed under BCS/Playoffs, SEC Football

The door’s open, but the ride it ain’t free.

One thing about an expanded postseason:  more playoff games means more playoff trips and more playoff trips means more playoff expenses.

The national champion Crimson Tide totaled $7.3 million in costs for two CFP trips, while runner-up Clemson spent $5.4 million, according to NCAA postseason expense reports for all four playoff teams obtained from the universities by CBS Sports…

Alabama spent the most on a single playoff game this past season, totaling $4.8 million in costs for the CFP National Championship in Glendale, Arizona. That equates to $5,555 per person who made the trip, easily the highest per-game average in the two-year history of the CFP.

To put Alabama’s 2016 title game costs in perspective, the school spent $4.3 million for the 2010 BCS Championship Game in Pasadena, California. Back then, the NCAA required schools to count bonuses for coaches and administrators in bowl expense reports. That’s no longer the case. Alabama spent $6.7 million on the 2016 CFP National Championship game itself when counting bonuses.

If you got it, flaunt it, baby.  Besides, all that support staff isn’t showing up for free.

The Crimson Tide sent a traveling party of 904 people to Arlington, Texas, for the Cotton Bowl and 857 to Arizona. Alabama brought 908 people to the semifinal at the Sugar Bowl in 2015, 881 to Miami for the 2013 BCS Championship Game and 778 to New Orleans for the 2012 BCS Championship Game.

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Filed under BCS/Playoffs, It's Just Bidness, Whoa, oh, Alabama

Baghdad Bill rides again.

Bill Hancock may blame the decline in the college football playoffs’ TV ratings at least partly on a “sophomore slump”, but the slump doesn’t extend to the most awesome part of the CFP.

There will again be six weeks of rankings during the season, the first on Nov. 1 and with the final poll coming out Dec. 4.

“That’s a good number,” said Hancock, noting the first ranking will be after the ninth week of the season and provide “plenty of games to evaluate.”

Hancock believes the CFP rankings have helped the regular season.

“I think we probably underestimated how much boost that would give to the regular season, as fans from around the country could now look around and see who they had to cheer for,” he said.

So you see, we were more excited about the chase to see which schools would be in the semi-finals than we were the semi-finals themselves.  Boy, don’t I feel foolish now for ever having thought the regular season risked being diminished by an extended postseason.

I wonder how long it takes for him to come up with some of the crap he says.

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Filed under BCS/Playoffs, Blowing Smoke

Punt, CFP, punt!

Nathan Deal may get pressure from outside parties about the religious liberty bill awaiting his signature, but it won’t come from the College Football Playoff folks or Greg Sankey.  At least not yet:

The College Football Playoff said Monday it opposes discrimination but will allow others to best decide whether a controversial religious freedom bill in Georgia becomes law. The SEC said it’s “attentive” to what’s happening in the state where it holds its football championship game…

“We deplore discrimination wherever it occurs and note that there is a public debate about this matter and its implications, as well as whether or not it will become law,” College Football Playoff executive director Bill Hancock said in a statement to CBS Sports. “We will keep an eye on this, but our group’s focus is on sports and public policy matters are better left to the experts and voters to resolve.”

Translation:  please, governor, veto this bill so we don’t have to show our ass either way.

Real profile in courage there, Bill.

Sankey’s statement is a couple of degrees warmer…

“Our conference championship events are an extension of our universities which are places of diversity and opportunity,” SEC commissioner Greg Sankey said in a statement. “We are attentive to this legislative matter as we continue our policy of considering numerous factors in determining sites for our championship events.”

… but more of the same.  He’ll wait to see which way the prevailing winds are blowing before making a decision one way or the other.  It would just be a heckuva lot more convenient if he never has to make one in the first place.

I guess that’s why they pay these guys the big bucks.

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Filed under BCS/Playoffs, Political Wankery, SEC Football

Living on borrowed time

I know I should post something about the annual grumbling March Madness selection spawns and how that should be a lesson to those who think the only thing keeping college football from true greatness is a bigger postseason field, but either I’m too jaded by it or too resigned to CFP’s ultimate fate to give a shit.

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