Category Archives: Crime and Punishment

The Briles will rise again.

Art Briles claims to be dumbfounded by the unfolding of events at Baylor.  I can’t figure out what’s more damning — that he’s sincere about feeling that way, or that he’s BSing.

In any event, he’s promising “That day will come” when he gets to tell his side of the story.  I suspect that’s when many of us will join him in being dumbfounded, although not for the same reason.

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Leaving it to the professionals

So, how tone deaf has Florida been handling the Title IX inquiry involving Gators receiver Antonio Callaway?  This tone deaf:

Florida athletics officials, including athletic director Jeremy Foley, were furious with their university-side counterparts Friday for the way they handled this situation. If not for this, the athletic department could have explained any outcome with this: The university has handled this from the start. Here are all the steps that were taken. This was all by the book.

Shades of We want to build a university our football team can be proud of. Too bad they can’t live up to that lofty standard.

Maybe Foley will testify at the civil trial.

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Filed under Crime and Punishment, Gators, Gators...

Making the punishment fit the crime

Julian Rochester’s odds of playing in the opener appear to be getting buttah and buttah.

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Filed under Crime and Punishment, Georgia Football

Florida’s entry into the Title IX sweepstakes

I’ll just leave you with this:

A woman who accused Florida football players Antonio Callaway and Treon Harris of sexually assaulting her in December is boycotting a Title IX hearing because the university appointed a Gators football booster to adjudicate the case…

Florida officials appointed attorney Jake Schickel to serve as a hearing officer. Schickel, a founding partner of a Jacksonville, Florida law firm, has a bachelor’s degree in political science and law degree from Florida. He is also a past trustee of Florida’s Levin College of Law.

A former track and field athlete at Florida, Schickel is a Scholarship Club donor to Florida Football Boosters, which requires annual contributions of $4,800 to $8,599, according to a 2014-15 “Year In Review” program published by the UF athletics department. According to the documents, Schickel is also a 3-Point Club donor to Florida basketball, which requires annual contributions of $2,000 to $4,999.

“To be clear, this letter is not intended to cast any aspersions about Mr. Schickel’s character or his service to his alma mater,” Clune wrote in an Aug. 2 letter to Hass. “However, UF should never have asked him to serve as an objective reviewer and decision-maker on this matter when the claim has been brought against a star member of the very team for which both he and his law partners have provided considerable financial support.

“:Quite frankly, short of finding a relative of Mr. Calloway, I’m not sure how UF could have found someone with more conflicts [than] Mr. Schickel.”

I’m sure he’ll be fair and impartial.  Go Gata!

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UPDATE:  Huntley Johnson will not let this aggression stand, man.

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UPDATE #2:  Believe it or not, this apparently is the school’s official response:

The University of Florida is prohibited to comment on the existence or substance of student disciplinary matters under state and federal law.

However, I can tell you that our student conduct process may be handled by a hearing officer, who could be a university employee or an outside professional, or by a committee of faculty and students.

Any hearing officer and all committee members are trained and vetted for their impartiality. A hearing officer or committee member would not be disqualified or lack objectivity simply because he or she had been a student athlete decades earlier or purchases athletic tickets as more than 90,000 people do each year.  [Emphasis added.]

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“Some women faced the prospect of their family being notified.”

Good Lord, Baylor.

“A number of victims were told that if they made a report of rape, their parents would be informed of the details of where they were and what they were doing,” said Chad Dunn, a Houston attorney who represents six women who have sued Baylor under the anonymous identification of Jane Doe.

I’m having a hard time deciding which of Baylor’s and Penn State’s administrations were the more despicable.

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If stupidity were an Olympic event…

Bob Bowlsby would be in line for a gold medal.

In case you were wondering how it was going in the Big 12 after the scandals at Baylor, here’s this thought from Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby at Big 12 media days:

… But let it suffice to say as it pertains to all of our institutions, we are very committed as a group of ten schools to eradicating sexual assault on our campuses. It almost goes without saying that when you combine alcohol and drugs and raging hormones and the experiences of 18-22 years old, it’s probably unrealistic to think that these kinds of things are never going to happen.

All that’s missing is sincere advice to victims everywhere to lie back and enjoy it if it should happen.

Raging hormones lead to rape?  It’s rather staggering to hear someone say this.  And in any event, it isn’t alcohol that causes sexual assault; it’s the one doing the assaulting who causes that.

So, yeah, this is sad and even a bit revolting.  And if Bowlsby’s a dumbass for saying it, what do we call the school presidents who think he’s doing a bang up job as Big 12 commissioner?

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Filed under Big 12 Football, Crime and Punishment, General Idiocy

Introducing the “spontaneous” Nick Saban

Andy Staples makes an excellent point about Saban’s notorious dust-up with PAWWWLLL at SEC Media Days.

If you think Saban, later caught on video having two separate animated conversations with Finebaum, lost control, then you haven’t been watching him very long. All of it was calculated, as is almost anything Saban does when a camera is trained on him. Yes, he is a control freak. He’ll admit as much. Yes, he believes he’s correct whenever he’s challenged by a media member or anyone else. He may not admit that, but it’s fairly obvious. But Saban wasn’t talking to Finebaum or to the viewers of the segment. Every reason Saban gave to explain why Robinson and Jones could miss no playing time was a message to players and recruits. The fact that the clip has received so much attention only played into Saban’s hands. When they speak to recruits now, Alabama assistants can point to that segment and ask the following: Do you see how much coach has his players’ backs? As it turns out, Saban, Finebaum and Finebaum’s employer all got exactly what each wanted out of that particular bit of theater.

Saban wanted that question from Finebaum—or someone—so he could raise questions about the legitimacy of the arrests, which came after a Monroe, La., officer smelled marijuana and approached a parked car containing Robinson, Jones and two other men…

The other benefit to that public exchange is that it wound up sucking all the oxygen out of the tent when another ‘Bama offensive lineman wound up on the wrong side of the law just a few days later.  The difference in the second case is that Alphonse Taylor was promptly kicked to the curb by Mr. Spontaneity.

Alabama offensive lineman Alphonse Taylor has been “indefinitely suspended,” coach Nick Saban announced in a statement Monday afternoon.

The redshirt senior was arrested Sunday and charged with driving under the influence.

In addition, Taylor left the scene of an accident, according to Tuscaloosa Police Department spokeswoman Lt. Teena Richardson.

“We are very disappointed any time a player makes a choice that leads to this kind of behavior,” Saban said. “We are still in the process of gathering all of the details on the situation, but from a football standpoint, Alphonse Taylor has been indefinitely suspended from the team.”

Ah, a little righteous indignation is good for the soul.  Hey — you don’t suppose Saban’s decision wasn’t about that, but, say, something a little more calculating, do you?

The preseason second-team All-SEC selection was already in Saban’s doghouse because of weight- and conditioning-related issues.

After starting all 15 games at right guard last season, Taylor was relegated to working with the second-team offense throughout the spring.

Saban said following the Tide’s spring game of Taylor, “He’s going to continue to be on the second team if he doesn’t get his weight down and get in shape.”

It’s unclear how much progress the 6-foot-5 Taylor has made with his weight and conditioning.

Not enough, evidently.

It’s just bad luck Taylor got arrested in Tuscaloosa, where the cops’ loyalty can’t be questioned.

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Filed under Crime and Punishment, Nick Saban Rules