Category Archives: Recruiting

COA impact so far? “Not at all.”

Eh, except where it might be.

“Kids and parents and high school coaches and AAU coaches are very aware of what cost of attendance is about and they want to know the number,” says NIU men’s basketball coach Mark Montgomery.

“It’s already a recruiting topic,’ adds [Northern Illinois Football Coach Rod] Carey. “It’s not as big of one as it will become because schools are still figuring out how much and how they’re doing it. Once that has a year to go through, and then you’re going to have comparables. Then yea, oh yea, it’s going to be a recruiting topic.”

No shit, Sherlock.

We’re still in the feeling out stage, but I have a hard time believing that Auburn and Tennessee aren’t pimping out their stipend advantage on the recruiting trail.  And why not?  That’s what it’s there for.  If it were me, I’d be pushing it hard.  It’s not like there’s a downside to doing so.

Now do I think it’s decisive in every kid’s case?  Of course not.  For some, the difference in the amount of the stipend at schools may not be enough to overcome things like playing time, state pride or the perceived quality of a particular program.  But for a recruit facing an all-other-things-being-equal choice, yeah, I suppose a couple of extra thousand dollars a year could be enough to swing a decision.

And as far as “Schools aren’t free to just make up a number, of course” goes… blogger, please.  Come spend some time in SEC Country and let me know how that works.

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Filed under Recruiting

“There’s a first time for everything.”

This From The Rumble Seat post about Georgia Tech’s recruitment of Demetris Robertson is about as classic an example of “so you’re saying there’s a chance” wistfulness as you’ll ever read.

Bonus points for “As for how georgia (sic) fits in to Robertson’s recruitment, it’s fairly unclear…”.  Yeah, the genius’ offense is clearly a better fit for Robertson’s skill set than any other in college football.

34 Comments

Filed under Georgia Tech Football, Recruiting, The Blogosphere

There’s loaded. And then there’s LOADED.

The top recruit in the class of 2016 signed with Michigan, but beyond him, the SEC did alright last week.

* SEC schools signed the top two pro-style quarterback prospects and three of the top five.

* SEC schools signed each of the top three dual-threat quarterback prospects, along with four of the top six.

* SEC schools signed four of the top six and six of the top 14 running backs. And league schools signed two of the top eight all-purpose backs.

* Robertson is the top wide receiver and he has yet to sign. As it is, SEC schools signed three of the top six, four of the top nine, five of the top 18 and six of the top 20 receivers.

* SEC schools signed the top tight end, along with four of the top nine and eight of the top 17 at the position.

* SEC schools signed three of the top four safeties.
* SEC schools signed three of the top five cornerbacks, as well as six of the top 10 and 11 of the top 20 at the position.
* SEC schools signed the top inside linebacker, as well as six of the top 15.

* SEC schools signed two of the top five outside linebackers.

* You’ll notice we skipped over the linemen. That’s because as well as SEC schools did at the other positions, they absolutely dominated in the trenches. SEC schools signed the top two offensive tackles, along with three of the top six, five of the top 10 and seven of the top 18. SEC schools signed three of the top 10 guards. SEC schools signed five of the top eight centers. Finally, SEC schools reeled in a boatload of top defensive linemen. League teams signed eight of the top 12 and 11 of the top 17 defensive tackles, along with four of the top six, five of the top 10 and six of the top 11 defensive ends.

Actually, that’s pretty staggering. And it’s how you wind up with this:

* Tennessee was 14th in the nation in recruiting — but that was good for just seventh in the SEC, smack dab in the middle. Consider this, though: That No. 14 finish puts put the Vols third in the ACC, Big Ten and Pac-12 and second in the Big 12.

Hugenin points out that Georgia reeled in its third top ten class in a row.  That’s nice, but…

Alabama has finished in the recruiting top 10 nine years in a row. FSU has finished in the top 10 in seven consecutive years; Ohio State has finished in the top 10 in six consecutive years. LSU has finished in the top 10 four years in a row, while Auburn, Georgia and USC have finished in the top 10 three years in a row.

When the day comes that college football delivers a sixteen-team playoff, you’ll likely see the field loaded with SEC teams.  In the meantime, with a four-team field, if Georgia can’t separate itself from the middle of the conference pack, it’s likely that its dreams will die regularly in Atlanta.

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Filed under Georgia Football, Recruiting, SEC Football

When the (blue) chips are down

It’s from a post at an FSU blog looking at Jim McElwain’s recruiting, so you can guess the overall tenor, but I can’t say I disagree in the slightest with this conclusion:

Stars matter, folks, especially at the macro level. You can scour the rankings and find terrific stories of 2 and 3 star kids who were missed in evaluations or found the right time and place to showcase their abilities, but at the end of the day, teams with the most talent win the most games. Alabama has won four national titles since 2009, FSU has a title, UF under Meyer has two since 2006, Meyer won another at Ohio State in 2014, and LSU and Texas each have one in the last 11 years. All of these programs recruit at the highest of levels, they are mainstays in the recruiting top 10 rankings, and their success on the field is not a fluke. New coaching can spark enthusiasm and excitement around a program, but at the end of the day in college football, it all comes down to recruiting. If you don’t have the players, you probably won’t win (enough). It is really as simple as that.

The author finds that Florida has come up short, or at least shorter, compared to its rivals, in signing four- and five-star studs.

Which brings us to Jim McElwain’s debut at UF in 2015. A National Championship winning offensive coordinator at Alabama under Nick Saban, with the pedigree and experience at the highest of levels, Florida’s confidence and optimism was expectedly high from the beginning. The 2015 class cannot be properly judged for a few more years, but on paper, only signing 20% blue chips is not the beginning for which many were hoping. With signing day 2016 upon us, the Gators sit at 37.5% blue chips and, given the way the second half of 2015 ended on the field for UF, the continued question marks at quarterback, and the fact that FSU does not appear to be slowing down anytime soon in terms of acquiring talent, either the coaching needs to get significantly better in a hurry, or UF could be in need of a fourth head coach in less than 15 years. A combined 30% rate over the first two classes is just not up to standards, and would rate outside the top-20 nationally.

If you blindly compared what McElwain (30%) has done to the first two years of Fisher (41%), Meyer (59%), Muschamp (64%) and Golden (24%), the closest match is to Al Golden. That doesn’t mean it won’t improve, but things certainly did not trend up in Year 2 like it did for Jimbo Fisher in 2011.

It didn’t hurt too much in 2015, as UF won the East, but it will be interesting to see if that begins taking a toll going forward.

Along those lines, one other thing to mention:  Georgia’s 2016 class sports a 65% blue chip rate.

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Filed under Gators, Gators..., Georgia Football, Recruiting

Still got some catching up to do

We’re justifiably excited that Georgia landed three five-star recruits in the 2016 class, but to keep things in perspective, consider that over the last four seasons, according to the 247 Sports Composite rankings, Alabama averaged at least three five-stars per class.

32 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, Nick Saban Rules, Recruiting

Give me just a little more time.

I’ve got a question for those of you bitching that Kirby Smart staying at Alabama to coach through the national title game cost Georgia on the recruiting trail with its 2016 class.

If you believe that had Smart spent the time chasing recruits for his new team instead of coaching his old one, he would have signed two or three more Dawgs, aren’t you implying that the 2017 class, which will be his focus for the next twelve months, should be significantly better?

Bonus question:  if so, logically, doesn’t that justify Smart’s decision to leave a few spots open now to use next year?

107 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, Recruiting

Game changer on the Flats

Georgia Tech just announced a four-year bachelor of science program in music technology.  Needless to say, the folks at StingTalk are speculating about the recruiting possibilities.

But this is Georgia Tech we’re talking about.  This is the face of the guy behind the new program.

jason-freeman-1-jv750xx1600-903-0-85

Sure, the genius could make this work.

40 Comments

Filed under Academics? Academics., Georgia Tech Football, Recruiting