Category Archives: The Body Is A Temple

“There ain’t no ‘Junction Boys’ anymore…”

The NCAA, you may have heard, has ended the long-standing practice of two-a-days.  There’s evidently some pretty good data behind the decision.

According to the NCAA’s Sport Science Institute, 58 percent of the football practice concussions that occur over the course of a year happen during the preseason. Brian Hainline, the NCAA’s chief medical officer, says August also is a peak month for catastrophic injuries resulting from conditioning rather than contact, such as heatstroke and cardiac arrest.

“There was just something about that month really stood out,” Hainline said. “We couldn’t say with statistical certainty if this was because of the two-a-days, but there was enough consensus in the room and enough preliminary data that it looked like it was because of the two-a-days.”

It was a fairly easy call, as well, because of the current realities of college football.

Coaches say that because players are on campus working out all year, there’s no need to work them quite as hard once preseason practices begin.

“Back in the day, we used two-a-days to get in shape,” Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher said. “You weren’t there all summer. You didn’t come until the second half. They didn’t train from January until June like they do now.”

Jimbo really did a “back in the day” there?  That’s real grizzled, man.

Anyway, we finally got a positive from amateurism.  Not having a life is good for your health, kids!

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Filed under The Body Is A Temple, The NCAA

Knee problem? What knee problem?

That’s Nick Chubb, squatting 600 (!) pounds.

I’m beginning to think there’s something to this whole mind over matter thing.

If he leads Georgia to a win in Knoxville this year, I hope he tears up a piece of the turf and walks off the field with it afterwards.

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Filed under Georgia Football, The Body Is A Temple

Meanwhile, on the injury front

When it comes to health issues, I don’t wish ill on any student-athlete, but in light of Georgia’s schedule, I thought I’d mention a couple of key hits.

No, those don’t translate into automatic wins for Georgia, but for once it’s news like this coming from other camps, instead of Athens.

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Filed under Gators, Gators..., Georgia Football, Notre Dame's Faint Echoes, The Body Is A Temple

Head games

Here’s a dilemma that only college football could love.

Oregon football players used three helmets last season — green, black and white — that were mixed and matched with myriad uniform combinations.

The Ducks were pioneers in football fashion and other schools have followed, using helmets to make a statement. Now, the NCAA wants to determine whether style is coming at the expense of safety.

The governing body’s football oversight committee will meet this week in Indianapolis and is to begin studying whether multiple helmets could lead to more concussions and serious head and neck injuries…

“Style and who looks cool and who’s matching with all these different uniforms combinations each week on the helmets and the shoes, that is big-time concern when you talk about recruiting, marketing and buzz and aesthetics on game day and other times,” Anderson said. “But at the end of the day, if we’re not protecting these players at the highest degree then we’re faltering.”

Stylin’ for recruiting versus safety.  Tough call, NCAA.

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Filed under Recruiting, The Body Is A Temple, The NCAA

Thursday morning buffet

Back to the chafing dishes, folks.

  • The NCAA refused to let Ed Orgeron speak at a charity event because… education.
  • Another day, another concussion lawsuit.
  • Latest national title odds have Georgia at 25-1.
  • Dan Wolken asks, “Why is Ole Miss going to these incredible lengths to protect Hugh Freeze?”  It’s a fair question.
  • Here’s al.com’s latest SEC hot seat ratings.
  • Can you name the five college programs that have appeared in every AP preseason Top 25 poll since 2005?  (I bet you can name the only one of those five that hasn’t played for a national title during that stretch.)
  • The NBA commissioner is struggling with the one-and-done issue.  Here’s an opinion piece that argues one-and-done hasn’t been that bad for colleges.

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Filed under Freeze!, Georgia Football, It's Just Bidness, SEC Football, See You In Court, Stats Geek!, The Body Is A Temple, The NCAA, What's Bet In Vegas Stays In Vegas

Wednesday morning buffet

I haven’t served up one of these in a while.  Hope I still know what I’m doing.

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Filed under Crime and Punishment, Gators, Gators..., Georgia Football, SEC Football, Strategery And Mechanics, Texas Is Just Better Than You Are., The Body Is A Temple

‘When I recruited this kid I told his mother that I’d take care of him.’

Man, this is a tough story to read.

A few years earlier, the coach, Don Horton, had learned that he had Parkinson’s disease, but these new, intensifying infirmities were more commonly linked to chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or C.T.E., a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated hits to the head and linked to football and other contact sports.

Was his deteriorating health, Horton wondered, a consequence of his many years as a football lineman? Even worse, he worried, was he responsible for exposing hundreds of players to the kind of head trauma now impairing his life? After all, as a prominent assistant coach at Boston College and North Carolina State for nearly 20 years, he had recruited and encouraged scores of athletes to play major college football.

In the still of night at home, Horton asked himself what he should say if a parent of a former recruit called to say that a son was suffering from C.T.E.-like symptoms.

“And I would tell him that he could say: ‘I know how it feels,’” his wife, Maura Horton, responded. “And Don didn’t necessarily like that answer. But that’s the truth.”

His brain was donated after death for research purposes, because he came to believe it was necessary.

By donating his brain, Horton believed he could aid the science and, ultimately, perhaps help people evaluate whether to play, or continue playing, the game.

“He wanted to make a difference if he could,” said Maura Horton, 47. “Don would never tell someone not to play the game, because he loved football and wouldn’t betray it. But he wanted them to see a full picture to make a full decision.”

She added: “Don said, ‘If they would be more reflective and be more upfront about things that were happening to them, they might get out of the game earlier if they needed to. Kids try to hide so much about what’s really happening.’”

If those running the sport don’t grasp the wisdom of that and adapt accordingly, it’s hard to avoid thinking that one day their control will be taken away in the name of caution.

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