Category Archives: The NCAA

Eh, what’s the worst that could happen?

You can trust Hugh Freeze, son.

Murchison said he was most concerned about the ongoing, and seemingly never-ending, NCAA investigation into the Ole Miss football program. Murchison was satisfied with the answers provided by Rebel head coach Hugh Freeze.

“Coach Freeze explained the investigation to me. He explained it well enough that I know to be smart about this decision,” he said. “Just what would be the worst that would happen. The worst thing would probably be a bowl ban, and it’s not likely to happen. That’s the only thing I had a question about, and they answered it. It was all right.”

I mean, if there’s anybody in America who’s had his finger on the NCAA’s pulse, it’s Hugh Freeze, amirite?

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15 Comments

Filed under Recruiting, The NCAA

Moar wussification coming

For safety reasons, the NCAA Sport Science Institute has recommended eliminating the popular two-a-day preseason practices and reducing contact at all practices, including limiting full contact to once a week during the season.

No doubt the Bear is turning over in his grave about now.

Here are the details:

  • In-season practices: Allow three days per week of non-contact/minimal contact, one day of live contact/tackling, and one day of live contact/thud. Currently, the recommendation is no more than two live contact/tackling days. Live contact means tackling to the ground and/or full-speed blocking. Non-contact/minimal contact practices don’t involve tackling, thud (in which players hit but don’t take each other to the ground), or full-speed blocking.
  • Preseason practices: Allow up to three days of live contact per week (tackling or thud) and three non-contact/minimal contact practices per week. One day must be no practice. A non-contact/minimal contact practice must follow a scrimmage.
  • Postseason practices: If there’s two weeks or less between the final regular-season game/conference championship game and the bowl game, in-season practice recommendations should remain in place. If there’s more than two weeks, then up to three days per week may be live contact and three days of non-contact/minimal contact.
  • Spring practices: Eight of the 15 allowable practices may involve live contact, including three that can be scrimmages. Live contact should be limited to two practices per week and not on consecutive days.

There is a caveat.

Of course, these changes are just recommendations. Even if the NCAA writes these guidelines into legislation, “you can choose to do what you want,” Hainline acknowledged. “But culturally, to ignore this public document that has such widespread endorsement, I don’t think it makes any sense from any point of view that you can point to.”

Especially if you don’t want to get your ass sued off.

16 Comments

Filed under The Body Is A Temple, The NCAA

“… dark, cloudy and a lot of uncertainty.”

I’d say pity the poor Rebels, except Hugh Freeze deserves every bit of karma he’s reaping from this.

23 Comments

Filed under Recruiting, The NCAA

“This bill has nothing to do with the current investigation at Ole Miss – nothing.”

Gridiron Now posts an interview with the doofus… er, Mississippi legislator… who’s pitching a bill that would fine the NCAA $10,000 a day for every day an investigation lasts past a year.

It’s as muddled as you’d expect someone who thinks a private, voluntary organization has to apply due process in dealing with its membership would sound.  Although it feels like he knows he’s not going far with his bill:

Q. Have you talked to people in other states that have had similar situations with the NCAA, and if so, what has been the feedback from those people?

A. Recently, I have had calls as far away as Connecticut to California, and in my preliminary research, I didn’t find where any other state had looked at it from this angle.

I think the conversation is ongoing, and that’s the goal, which is to raise awareness and create conversation on this topic.

Conversation?  Not until Stacey Osburn sings, skippy.

4 Comments

Filed under Political Wankery, The NCAA

The NCAA calls a time out.

Father Emmert knows what’s best for you, kids.

Only the five wealthiest conferences could debate what a day off means for their employees … er, “amateur” athletes. Before the Power Five passed some sensible rules Friday to loosen up athletes’ time a little bit, some amendments were proposed by the adults.

USA Today reported one amendment, which overwhelmingly failed, would have allowed athletes to host a recruit on their day off provided they gave prior consent. Another amendment, which closely passed, allows life-skill activities to be held on athletes’ off days. Some player representatives at the NCAA Convention weren’t buying the amendments, recognizing how the system was trying to control days off for unpaid players who are supposedly students first.

The integrity of the day off?  Son, wait ’til you get married and are presented with your first Saturday honey-do list.  But I digress.

The NCAA actually posted this quote from a student-athlete on its web site announcing the votes, which tells you the degree of disconnect that still exists.  Control, baby!

“It’s about owning your time. Coaches need to understand that student-athletes aren’t on call at all times,” Darlington said. “This is about changing the perception of coaches: Our time is our time.”

Good luck with that.  Because… well, you know the because.

What remains untouched: The number of games and when/where they are played. If NCAA members really want to make athletes closer to traditional students, play fewer 9 p.m. games on a Tuesday night a couple hours away from your campus. But that won’t happen because this is pro sports masked as amateur.

“We all know games are the elephant in the room, especially basketball,” said one Power Five athletic director, who asked to remain anonymous.

“I agree it’s an issue,” Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott said. “I think that’s a more complex, sport-by-sport set of discussions we may have in the future. I think in this first round of time demands legislation we’re focusing around the practice schedules.”

“You mean we should be the adults in the room and play fewer games?” quipped another anonymous Power Five AD. “We can try to make amends where we can that helps. But the travel for all the games really is what changes their lives. The games seem to be sacred among the athletes.”

Hey, as long as you’ve got a sense of humor about it, it’s all good, amirite?

And on a similar note, Eleven Warriors argues that if the NCAA is all about student-athlete welfare when it comes to extending the season with a second bye week, giving those young bodies more time to heal during all those weeks of play, why not go further and return to an eleven-game schedule?

As I said, as long as you’ve got a sense of humor about it, it’s all good.

7 Comments

Filed under Look For The Union Label, The NCAA

Busy day at the NCAA

All kinds of business being passed…

Hope you enjoyed it, Harbaugh.

What are these kids supposed to do now at five in the morning?  Sleep?

Coaches are gonna hate that one  Wonder if Saban’s already dreaming up a work around.

Ditto.  Find it interesting this proposal passed by the same margin as the first one I mentioned.

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Filed under The NCAA

Obvious political wankery is obvious.

Gee, who could have expected that a former Ole Miss football player who’s now a state legislator is introducing a bill aimed at NCAA investigations?

Rep. Trey Lamar, R-Senatobia, introduced the potential legislation (House Bill 1040), which would force under the threat of financial penalty for the NCAA “to complete its investigation, present findings to the NCAA Committee on Infractions and to render its final decision either imposing penalties for the violations proven in the investigation process or dismissal of the allegations” within nine months of a member institution’s response to a letter of inquiry.

“Financial penalty”?  Do tell us more, Trey.

Should the NCAA fail to meet these time frames, the bill proposes it would be fined $10,000 each day it goes past the window of time and said fine should be “payable to the member institution subject to the investigation and actionable through the Circuit Courts of the State of Mississippi.”

Only in Mississippi would somebody think it a good idea to incentivize schools to drag out violation investigations.  At least I hope only in Mississippi.

Though Rep. Lamar can rest comfortably with the thought that the NCAA’s head of enforcement is sensitive to time issues.

7 Comments

Filed under Political Wankery, The NCAA