Category Archives: The NCAA

Today, in things I did not know

I have no idea what this means, but it sounds like fun.

The NCAA has rules against “camp blocking”?

Advertisements

12 Comments

Filed under Coach O Needs Another Red Bull, Recruiting, The NCAA

Does amateurism in defense of academics make any sense?

You tell me.

According to a report from Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce, between 70 and 80 percent of college students are active in the labor market. Roughly 40 percent of undergraduates work at least 30 hours a week, while 25 percent of all students enrolled on a full-time basis also work full time. Some of those employees—a cohort that once included yours truly, who worked at the Georgetown bookstore—even get paid for campus jobs.

The NCAA’s member schools don’t prohibit any of those students from making money. Because that would be utterly ridiculous. Why, Grenardo asks, are athletes treated differently? Because they’re especially good at catching footballs?

During the O’Bannon trial, Stanford University athletic director and amateurism advocate Bernard Muir was questioned by players’ attorney Renae Steiner about computer-science students at his school earning income from software they developed in class, a pretty fair analogue for playing revenue sports. It did not go well:

Steiner: “Are you aware that some of those students at Stanford were making $3,000 a day on their apps?”

Muir: “[I] was not aware of that.”

Steiner: “And they were making more than the professor teaching them in that class?”

Muir: “Okay. I will take your word for it.”

Steiner: “Okay. Do you know if those students are no longer integrated into the academic community at Stanford?”

Muir: “I would assume that they are.”

“It’s crazy, the idea that if we put $20,000, $30,000, $40,000 into the pockets of these athletes who don’t have a lot of money, who knows what they will do with it,” Grenardo says. “Even at my law school, some of my students have better cars than me. Nobody says about kids who are affluent, ‘Oh my God, we need to rein this in.'”

Last year, Emmert took his employer’s logic to its dopiest possible conclusion and claimed that paying college athletes would make them no longer students at all, presumably because simultaneously (a) playing campus sports, (b) being paid for playing that sport, and (c) being a college student would require a heretofore unknown quantum state.

Push come to shove, and even the NCAA isn’t buying what Emmert’s shoveling.

Does the college sports establishment even believe its own malarkey? Not entirely. University of Notre Dame president John Jenkins told the New York Times that permitting player pay would be an “Armageddon” that “does some violence to [the] educational relationship” between athletes and their schools—but school athletic director Jack Swarbrick told VICE Sports at a campus sports reform meeting in Washington, D.C., that he doesn’t think there’s a link between amateurism and education. The NCAA touted education as its raison d’être in the O’Bannon case, but responded to McCants and Ramsay’s lawsuit over the North Carolina scandal by arguing in federal court that it has no legal duty to make sure said education is actually delivered.

“This is the underlying lie of the NCAA,” says Michael Hausfeld, the Washington, D.C.-based antitrust attorney who headed the O’Bannon case and is also the lead litigator on McCants and Ramsay’s suit. “Up until we filed the North Carolina case, you had the NCAA saying they are there for the welfare of athletes as students. Now they say they have nothing to do with that. You can’t be more of a hypocrite.”

Eh, I don’t know about that.

29 Comments

Filed under Academics? Academics., The NCAA

Today, in amateurism

Talk to the hand, kid.

On Saturday, June 10, De La Haye uploaded a new YouTube video titled, “Quit college sports or quit YouTube?”. In the video, the kicker showed up to a meeting at the football offices exclaiming he felt like it was Judgement Day.

“Everything’s going to go well,” he said in the video. “We’re just going to talk about ways that I can keep doing what I’m doing and follow the rules.”

It’s unclear who the meeting was with, but upon returning, De La Haye said he was basically given an ultimatum of choosing between football or YouTube videos.

“The meeting went well, but it didn’t go well at the same time,” he said. “Basically, I’m not allowed to make any money off of my YouTube videos. I’m working hard basically as a job — filming, editing and things of that sort, and I’m not allowed to make any money. If I do, then bad things happen for me. I feel like they’re making me pick between my passion for what I love to do shooting videos and entertaining and my other passion, playing football.”

Just like any other student, amirite?

14 Comments

Filed under The NCAA

“We don’t dance to their tune.”

Just when you thought the Ole Miss shitstorm couldn’t possibly get more popcorn-worthy…

A business in Oxford, Miss., has filed a civil complaint alleging defamation that could reverberate through the University of Mississippi’s ongoing NCAA case. Rebel Rags LLC, an Oxford-based clothing company, filed the complaint Friday in Lafayette County Circuit Court.

The suit alleges defamation in the NCAA testimony of two Mississippi State football players, Leo Lewis and Kobe Jones, and also Lindsey Miller, the estranged stepfather of former Rebel star Laremy Tunsil. In Ole Miss’s response to the NCAA’s notice of allegations last week, it attempts to deny the allegations that two recruits and the family member of a recruit—Lewis, Jones and Miller—received a total of $2,800 in gear from Rebel Rags.

Sports Illustrated spoke Sunday evening with Rebel Rags’s attorney, Charles Merkel, who explained that the store “has caught the broadside of lies.” The suit has yet to become public because it was filed on Friday afternoon and has yet to register in the court’s computer system.

There’s no way that case winds through the court system as quickly as the NCAA decides what to do with the school.  That can only mean one thing:  when does Ole Miss ask the NCAA to put its investigation on hold until Rebel Rags can get a little justice?

5 Comments

Filed under Freeze!, See You In Court, The NCAA

“Any school can do what we did.”

For those of you who wonder what intercollegiate sports might look like in the absence of NCAA supervision, college rugby offers a tantalizing story.

Don’t go too crazy here — for one thing, Cal, which is one of only two schools that offers men’s rugby as a full NCAA program, dominates the sport and won the last championship — but this is certainly intriguing:

Yet, last Saturday and Sunday, Kutztown was one of 24 teams — most of them clubs — competing in the eighth annual Collegiate Rugby Championship at Talen Energy Stadium, home of the Philadelphia Union of Major League Soccer. More than 27,000 fans showed up for the weekend games — exceeding the attendance at 10 college football bowl games last year. And the event was televised nationally by NBC’s sports networks.

Added bonus:  “Alcohol sales, prohibited at many N.C.A.A. sites, were strong (Irish whiskey a particular favorite).”

14 Comments

Filed under The NCAA

Thursday morning buffet

Back to the chafing dishes, folks.

  • The NCAA refused to let Ed Orgeron speak at a charity event because… education.
  • Another day, another concussion lawsuit.
  • Latest national title odds have Georgia at 25-1.
  • Dan Wolken asks, “Why is Ole Miss going to these incredible lengths to protect Hugh Freeze?”  It’s a fair question.
  • Here’s al.com’s latest SEC hot seat ratings.
  • Can you name the five college programs that have appeared in every AP preseason Top 25 poll since 2005?  (I bet you can name the only one of those five that hasn’t played for a national title during that stretch.)
  • The NBA commissioner is struggling with the one-and-done issue.  Here’s an opinion piece that argues one-and-done hasn’t been that bad for colleges.

36 Comments

Filed under Freeze!, Georgia Football, It's Just Bidness, SEC Football, See You In Court, Stats Geek!, The Body Is A Temple, The NCAA, What's Bet In Vegas Stays In Vegas

“Your honor, in support of our motion, we cite the case of In re: The Joker.”

This is easily the comedic highlight of Ole Miss’ response to the NCAA’s laundry list of allegations:

Right behind that was Ole Miss’ futile attempt to interview Dan Mullen during the process of formulating its response.

And you thought it wouldn’t pay to have a sense of humor dealing with the NCAA.

5 Comments

Filed under Freeze!, The NCAA