Tag Archives: Mark Richt

Evil Richt, with a vengeance

It’s the P.S. in his letter that really nails it for me.

***********************************************************************

UPDATE:  Too good to be true.

That’s kind of evil, too, now that I think about it.

45 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football

A fine line

Just curious about something, based on a debate some of y’all had in the comments this week.  Take a look at this:

Of the 12 winningest coaches in SEC history, as judged by winning percentage, are active in the conference. Nick Saban‘s .804 on-the-field winning percentage at LSU and Alabama ranks fourth in conference history behind Urban Meyer (.813), Gene Stallings (.810) and Frank Thomas (.805). LSU’s Les Miles is fifth at .798, South Carolina’s Steve Spurrier is ninth at .750 and Georgia’s Mark Richt is 12th at .739.

Where do you draw the line between good and great there?  Fifth?  Ninth?  Eleventh?

119 Comments

Filed under SEC Football

Wow

The problem with exercises like this one, aside from coachspeak (Of the 65 coaches, ‘hungry’ was the most common description.”) is the lack of nuance.

Is Richt saying…

  • “Wow, wait ’til people get a load of Isaiah McKenzie”?
  • “Wow, I can’t believe Ray Drew is on the scout team”?
  • “Wow, Todd Gurley”?
  • “Wow, I can’t believe that with a week to go we haven’t settled on the starters in the secondary yet”?

Beats me.

What do you think he’s ginned up about?

34 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football

So much for absence makes the heart grow fonder.

Mark Richt doesn’t seem to be reluctant about throwing daggers in Todd Grantham’s direction these days.

https://twitter.com/FletcherPage/status/499596760306946048

Of course, I could be totally off base about who those “some coaches” are.

But I doubt it.

28 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football

The perception of Mark Richt, in charts

Marc Weiszer Chris White has an informative piece up comparing aspects of the career of Mark Richt versus those of Vince Dooley, Paul “Bear” Bryant, Nick Saban, Les Miles and Steve Spurrier.  And you know what?  For the most part, Richt comes off respectably in comparison.

He does look bad in record against top rival, but even in that area, he shows signs of turning that around, riding a three-game winning streak and playing the Gators even over the last eight games.

Then, there’s this:

Talk all you want about winning percentage and bowl games, but most fans will tell you all that matters at the end of the day is the ability to finish atop the heap. Bryant earned six tiles in this time, a feat matched only by Michigan’s Fielding H. Yost. Saban is the only other coach listed with more than one title, and Richt is the lone coach in this sample who doesn’t yet have a national championship on his record.

The difference between zero and one may not seem like much, but when it comes to winning national championships, it’s a big gap.

Bonus note – this doesn’t come from the AB-H piece, but it’s worth pointing out that Georgia remains in enviable company when it comes to road records.

17 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, Stats Geek!

Type “Mark Richt lost control” into Google and you will get roughly 29,000 results.

Here’s something I never thought I’d see appear in print:

Saban and Richt want the same thing when it comes to keeping players on the right track and on the right side of the law. But for at least one day and one offseason, the coach we expected to play the role of disciplinarian was not the one who showed up to take the stage.

Aight.

15 Comments

Filed under Crime and Punishment, Georgia Football, Nick Saban Rules

Another year, another Richt narrative?

I get that Georgia’s drug policy is less tolerant than most schools.  I also get that Richt strongly supports it, to the point that he’s willing to accept the consequences of being tougher than others. He reiterated that at SEC Media Days, when he said,

“No, we’re not worried about that part of it,” Richt said. “We don’t want our guys to do drugs, okay? I don’t want my son to do drugs. We’ve got policies that are stronger maybe than some when it comes to the punitive part of it. That’s kind of what everybody talks about. Georgia ends up suspending their guys a little bit sooner in the policy, which I’ve got no problems with.”

The same can be said for Richt’s stance on player transfers.

Richt also reiterated his philosophy on granting players the right to transfer wherever they like. He was asked about it in the aftermath of the rash of offseason departures that saw two key players go to Louisville and another to Auburn.

“When guys leave our program, my goal for them is that they continue their career and they continue and realize all their dreams,” Richt said. “Life’s too short. They’re young men that make mistakes. If somewhere along the way you learn from your mistake, you turn it around, finish your career strong, I’m happy for the guy.”

After that, things got a little fuzzy.  First, Nick Saban, who’s dealing with his own rash of player problems, followed Richt with his philosophy, which I suppose was supposed to come off as a justification for some tough love, but instead sounded a little like he was pointing fingers.  (The irony of Saban having a former Georgia player on his roster isn’t lost on me.)

“I want you to know that there’s not one player, not one player, since I’ve been a head coach that I kicked off the team that ever went anywhere and amounted to anything and accomplished anything, playing or academically,” Saban said. “That’s not always the answer. Discipline is not punishment. Punishment is only effective when it can help change somebody’s behavior.

“When you have a family and you have someone in your family who disappoints you, we certainly can’t kick them out of our family. I think we have to try to support them, teach them, get them to do the right things because we love them, we care about them.”

I wasn’t the only one who got that impression, either.

It’s puzzling, because I’m not really sure what Saban wanted to accomplish with his stance, other than to try to state a case for why he feels his players may be entitled to more second chances than players at other programs.  And if that’s all that was about, it’s hard to understand why he felt the need to justify that to the media in the first place.

Needless to say, some in the media took the ball and ran with it in one direction.

Maybe Saban will take a cue from the SEC coach once excoriated for disciplinary problems — Georgia’s Mark Richt.

Richt actually seems harder on crime than ever. The Bulldogs dismissed safeties Tray Matthews and Josh Harvey-Clemons this offseason.

“Just because we’ve got guys suspended isn’t evidence we have a discipline problem,” Richt said. “It’s evidence that we discipline our players. It’s evidence there’s accountability. … Sometimes when you make part of your discipline playing time, it becomes a very public thing. Some of your dirty laundry gets out there in public. I’m willing to take that risk if the process will help these guys grow into men. If we ignore stuff they do and act like it didn’t happen and sweep it under the rug, let them get away with it or whatever, what are we teaching? We are setting them up for failure down the road.”

And that’s certainly one way of looking at it, although Saban didn’t sound like someone waiting for a cue.

But there was also this strange take from SI’s Andy Staples and Zac Ellis, which took a mash-up of the two themes and actually posed the question whether Richt’s morality is interfering with the success of the program.  (It also glosses over the fact that Richt has no control over where a dismissed player lands, but we’ll leave that for another day.)

The thing is, for all this supposed strictness, all the players cited on that clip received second chances at Georgia.  So where’s the sweet spot supposed to be? It sure beats me, but you can bet Richt won’t hear the last of this if Georgia doesn’t at least get to the SECCG this season.

53 Comments

Filed under Crime and Punishment, Georgia Football, Media Punditry/Foibles, Nick Saban Rules