Tag Archives: Son of Dooley

“I call it Wikipedia. That’s what it is right now, our offense.”

SOD is back, folks.

Derek Dooley is Missouri’s offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach, which is interesting because Dooley has never been an offensive coordinator or a quarterbacks coach before.

“Interesting” would be one way of putting it.

“I call it Wikipedia. That’s what it is right now, our offense,” Dooley told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “Every day you can go on there and there’s a new sentence (and say), ‘Oh, I wonder who added that?”

In addition to Dooley, much of the Missouri offensive staff is also new. Offensive line coach Brad Davis was hired from Florida and wide receivers coach A.J. Ofodile was promoted from director of recruiting operations.

“The idea is I don’t want to just cram some system down them,” Dooley said. “Everything they do is brand new. We want to build on some things they did well here. We want to add some things to help us have a little flexibility in how we attack defenses.”

This is gonna be a fun watch.  I mean, what could go wrong?



Filed under SEC Football, Strategery And Mechanics

SOD it, Missouri.

An alternate history, via Paul Myerberg’s Tennessee preview:

Tennessee was a few first downs, a third-down conversion, a fourth-down stop, a two-point conversion and an errant pass away from reaching bowl eligibility last fall, the program’s third year under ex-coach Derek Dooley. These missteps – a few of many on the year – all came in the second half against Missouri, a game the Volunteers gave away on the second Saturday of November.

Let’s say UT wins that game, doing one or two of the above to move to 5-5 with two games to play. Perhaps the Vols still lose to Vanderbilt; the Vols still beat Kentucky to reach six wins. Now, let’s say UT wins its bowl game to finish with seven victories. Let’s say the university sees enough progression to give Dooley another year – and that’s a stretch, but stick with me.

Meet the one loss that might have changed the entire future of Tennessee football: Missouri 51, Tennessee 48.

Damn it, Tigers!  Your first year in and that’s your legacy?  Barbara’s never gonna forgive you.

By the way, this line from Myerberg is Envy and Jealousy-worthy:  “Vanderbilt texted with friends as it toyed with the Vols in a 41-18 win.”


Filed under Because Nothing Sucks Like A Big Orange

Tuesday morning buffet

Tasty nibblets abound this morning.

  • Just when you thought the NCAA/Nevin Shapiro mess couldn’t get any weirder, it does.
  • Pete Fiutak thinks SOD failed at UT because he “was way too nice and way too decent to be able to crush and kill in the cutthroat world of the SEC.”  So how come he had a losing record at La. Tech?
  • Maybe it’s just me, but I don’t find this list convincing.
  • Mark Emmert goes on record saying a fourth college subdivision for the haves could work.
  • Brian Cook looks at Big Ten recruiting and finds that Kentucky and Tennessee are wrecking havoc.
  • Michael Elkon rips Tony Barnhart’s selection committee proposal.
  • Wisconsin’s 2015 conference schedule is a piece of work.  At least fans will be able to stay home and see what’s on the Big Ten Network.


Filed under BCS/Playoffs, Big Ten Football, Gators, Gators..., Media Punditry/Foibles, Recruiting, The NCAA

Delicate fee-fees in Knoxville

This is amusing on a number of levels:

… Former Vol players won’t miss Dooley either after they say he turned them away from attending practices and being connected to the program.

“No one expects red carpet but we do expect to be able to go watch spring practice,” said former UT QB Erik Ainge, who hosts a radio show on Tennessee Sports Radio 1180. Ainge said one time Dooley reached out to him to be his “spin doctor” in the media. “I sat in front of his office with his secretary and we talked for 45 minutes. I knew everybody over there better than he did. His dry cleaning wasn’t done properly, so he was making them re-starch his drycleaning. And I just sat there for 45 minutes.

“He made it really hard. Tennessee fans are begging for you to give ’em something to get excited about. It’s as much a part of the culture here in East Tennessee as anything. You got Dollywood and UT. He made it really hard even for the die-hards to get on board.”

SOD evidently never learned the first rule of head coaching:  It’s okay to be an asshole.  As long as you’re winning.


Filed under Because Nothing Sucks Like A Big Orange


Now this is helpful.

With keen insight like that, it’s hard to believe SOD no longer has a job.


Filed under Georgia Football

In hindsight, maybe this wasn’t the best decision.

I bet when SOD looks back on what went wrong, the Sal Sunseri hire will eat at him the most.  Sure, he had to do something, since most of his 2011 staff bailed on him, but it’s not like there wasn’t plenty of relevant history about how SEC defenses switching to a 3-4 scheme do in their first season.

Surely there was a 4-3 guy out there who would’ve done better than this.  If Dooley had hired a new DC who merely held serve from the previous season, it’s likely he’d be getting his team ready for a bowl game today.


Filed under Because Nothing Sucks Like A Big Orange, Stats Geek!, Strategery And Mechanics

Okay, so now you tell us.

A couple of hindsight is always 20/20 stories for your amusement:

First, we learn that the high school coaches nearest to SOD Country never had much use for the guy, because he didn’t have much use for them.  There’s a lot of hurt feefees on display, as well as sour grapes.

“I didn’t like that staff, to be honest,” Price said. “I grew up in this state and I would go to the games about every week and wanted to support them. I’m a Tennessee fan, but we never heard anything from them. Not even a visit just to introduce who was recruiting our area or a call or anything. It was like they didn’t care whether they had any relationship with us at all, so how would we ever feel good about sending a kid there once we had one they wanted?

“I’ve been coaching a long time and dealt with a lot of coaches at every level, and those guys were the worst as far as feeling like they wanted to work with you or have any relationship at all with the high school coaches.”

Sumbitches!  And here’s the best part:  “The lack-of-communication complaint was echoed by all 37 coaches who responded to the poll, and each said the staffs under former coaches Phillip Fulmer and Lane Kiffin seemed to care more about building a working relationship.”  Hey, great!  And how did that work out for Tennessee?

But that’s mild stuff compared with Kevin Scarbinsky’s don’t-let-the-door-hit-you-in-the-ass farewell to Gene Chizik.  It’s a classic of the genre.  Even if just half of what’s in there is true, it’s hard to see how Jay Jacobs still has a job this morning.

My favorite part:

Newton, Fairley and the seniors received plenty of credit for the national title. So did offensive coordinator Gus Malzahn, whose attack set school and SEC records. People close to Chizik believe he felt slighted in the afterglow even though he deserved and earned praise for his steady hand as allegations of recruiting violations threatened Newton’s eligibility.

Chizik seemed to change after the national title. It’s not uncommon for coaches to write books after that kind of season, but his – “All In: What It Takes to Be the Best” – was far more about him than about the team.

I guess they should have read his book more carefully.  They can probably get a cheap copy of it now, though.


Filed under Auburn's Cast of Thousands, Because Nothing Sucks Like A Big Orange, Gene Chizik Is The Chiznit, Recruiting