Dual-threat quarterback is the new black.

In more ways than one, I’d say.

In an interview with Bleacher Report, Watson said, “People think, ‘Oh, he’s a black quarterback. He must be dual-threat.’ People throw that word around all the time. It’s lazy.”

Really looking forward to as much uninformed commentary on this subject as we’ve seen on the spread over the last decade.

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28 Comments

Filed under Strategery And Mechanics

28 responses to “Dual-threat quarterback is the new black.

  1. Biggen

    When was the true last pro style black pocket passer in CFB?

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  2. UGA85

    As college football has changed, more and more teams are looking for quarterbacks like Watson. He is agile and quick, and he is an accurate passer. What’s wrong with that? The rules protect quarterbacks, so he is free to run for first downs when he needs to. As we have seen, he can break down even the best defenses. I honestly feel that Eason needs to work on his mobility and his ability to evade the rush in order for us to improve offensively.

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    • There just aren’t very many Deshaun Watsons. Most guys as athletic as he is just aren’t that deadly accurate. The closest thing we’ve seen to him is DJ and Shockley was good, but never that damn good and especially not early on. And DJ was a special player.

      Point being that you want a guy like Watson sure, but you can’t count on a bunch just appearing. I’m sure everybody wants a Cam Newton too. None have appeared.

      Eason can move enough. He’s no Greyson Lambert or Hutson Mason. He’s got some agility and can throw on the move.

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      • UGA85

        Yet the rules that protect quarterbacks encourage more and more mobility and running from the quarterback position. More and more, mobile QB’s have become the norm in college football. I see no advantage in having a quarterback with no mobility, and I hope Eason takes advantage of the protection offered him next year.

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        • There is no advantage to having a qb without mobility. If your statue can throw darts and your 4.2 guy throws it to the other team every time you’re better off with the statue. If your 4.2 guy can throw like Brady you can win every game on your schedule. It’s a balance.

          The first thing a qb has to be able to do throw is throw it. Everything else is a plus. The idea that you throw out Eason for a guy who can run means that you’d start our punter over Eason. Brice can’t throw worth a shit but he’s athletic as hell.

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    • Macallanlover

      Agree, you don’t have to embrace the style of Michael Vick or Cam Newton, Aaron Rodgers is both good in the pocket and able to move around and hit receivers, or take off and get a 1st down. Watson is a good example of what QBing will look like going forward. Opportunities will be there for “statues” with skills like Peyton Manning and Tom Brady but those are harder to find.

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  3. gastr1

    Also, Jameis Winston, for that list above…which reminds me, the pocket passer certainly hasn’t left the building in the NFL. The most mobile QB among the “elites” is Rogers and his mobility is mostly associated with his amazing ability to throw on the run (rather than run on the run, so to speak).

    There may be more QBs in the NFL that can move, but they’re still dwarfed by the number of traditional passers with arm strength and height over quickness–even the younger ones like Carr, Winston, Jared Goff, etc.

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    • and Elway and Tarketon and Steve Young before that. Having wheels has always been an asset at every level of football. However the first thing you have to do is be able to throw it. If you can add something to the mix, even better. If you can run like Vick you don’t have to throw like Marino, but you’ve gotta throw it better than Nick Marshall.

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  4. Uglydawg

    A few days ago someone on here posted a link to the whole 76 WLOCP. I watched the whole thing…(man..the girls were hot then too..and the camera guy liked to feature them)…but the most remarkable thing was what an amazing QB Ray Goff was. He took over the second half of that game and with almost magical ball handling skills, ran Florida into the ground with the option. His strength and running skills were really impressive. Say what you like about his coaching shortcomings, but the guy was a real duel-threat QB.
    Also, who besides me remember James Jackson? He ran for over 1300 yards in his UGA QBing career..circa 1984…

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    • AthensHomerDawg

      I remember him. He had to be the smallest qb to play at Georgia.

      After Flannaghan-
      “Over the next eight years, Georgia featured only two black quarterbacks but neither started a game until redshirt freshman Wayne Johnson (photo) did so in the 1985 season opener against Alabama on Labor Day night.

      In one of the most exciting but heart-breaking Bulldog games I can remember, Johnson was benched for James Jackson – another black quarterback – but then returned to jump start a sluggish offense. Johnson finished with 82 yards on 8 of 13 passing, one touchdown and no interceptions. He would start Georgia’s next two games – victories over Baylor and Clemson – only to be benched again for Jackson.”

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  5. Bright Idea

    I would never call Eason duel threat of course but if anyone thinks he is immobile they couldn’t have watched the games. I guess tall white boys can’t move is the common perception. That’s just lazy.

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    • AthensHomerDawg

      Johnny Manziel: “Thaz right “

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    • Sherlock

      Every black QB is a dual threat
      Every white RB is a power back even 5’8″ 200 lb Danny Woodhead who runs a 4.3 40-yard dash.
      Every white WR that is shorter than 6’3″ is a gym rat that runs crisp routes from the slot and can only be compared to Wes Welker.
      Every white WR that is taller that 6’3″ is a TE even if they play split-end or flanker and never block inside the box.

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  6. HVL Dawg

    Clever header.

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  7. diving duck

    This is such a tired talking point already. The most important quality in a qb is being able to deliver the ball accurately to the right receiver. Newton and Watson were very accurate college passers and decision makers. If they can also make plays with their feet it’s a bonus that’s impossible to defend at times. John Franklin is a 4 star duel threat guy and he can’t move an offense designed for a running qb. They thought that every duel threat guy is the next Watson/Newton/Jackson is foolish. I’ll take Eason everyday.

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  8. rchris

    A pro-style qb requires a premier ol. If you don’t have that you’re better off with a dually. Maybe we should’ve played Godwin at qb last year, lol.

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  9. Napoleon BonerFart

    Am I the only one who finds it ironic that Watson objects to being accurately labeled? He certainly is a dual-threat. Yes, he’s a very good pocket passer. And yes, he’s big and strong and fast as a runner.

    It seems Watson’s point is that QB’s that were good runners and mediocre passers were called dual-threat, so a QB that is genuinely good at both skills shouldn’t be called dual-threat. As Johnny Cochran would say, “That does not make sense!”

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  10. Biggus Rickus

    This is a dumb article. Aaron Murray ran for 900 yards one year in high school. Was he a dual-threat QB? The point is not the stats you put up in high school, where a guy doesn’t have to be an especially great running threat to put up rushing yards in the right system, but what your level of athleticism projects you to be able to do in college. Watson’s quote might be even dumber. Deshaun Watson is the very definition of a dual-threat QB, as evidenced by the fact that he ran for nearly 2,000 yards (including 1,100 as a sophomore) and threw for over 10,000. I don’t see how race is a factor, aside from the fact that on average, black people are faster than white people and would therefore be more likely to fall into the dual-threat category if they play QB at a high level.

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