“They’re really not supposed to use their judgment.”

Is the NCAA dysfunctional?  Is the Pope Catholic?

If nothing else, the satellite camp debate crystallizes that the NCAA governance system is still broken almost two years after the model significantly changed.

Shocking, I know.

All of this would be more amusing if there weren’t major issues for the NCAA to tackle on behalf of athletes: compensation, concussion safety rules, agents, time demands, transfer rules, health insurance and scholarship guarantees, just to name a few. If you can’t figure out which way you’re voting about coaches traveling to a couple summer football camps, how in the world are you going to pass meaningful change for players beyond cost of attendance?

Ooh, I know!  They’ll figure out something right after they lose another lawsuit.  Helluva way to run a railroad.

2 Comments

Filed under The NCAA

2 responses to ““They’re really not supposed to use their judgment.”

  1. Jared S.

    Speaking of railroad….
    It’s a perfect metaphor for the NCAA. The “major issues” mentioned – compensation, concussion safety rules, agents, time demands, transfer rules, health insurance and scholarship guarantees, etc. – are the locomotive roaring down the tracks, and the NCAA is tied up and laying across the tracks, in the path of the oncoming train. And the NCAA has no sense of urgency or give-as-shit about it.
    Kinda reminds me of Congress.

  2. Sparrow

    I’m sure most everyone already caught this on SB Nation, but it’s as good a summary on the satellite camps as exists. http://www.sbnation.com/college-football/2016/4/21/11478272/ncaa-satellite-camps-recruiting-jim-harbaugh

    And FauxPellini is a treasure.