Your 1.9.19 Playpen

I’ll throw out two topics for you to chew on in the comments.

First, a political one.  Is there anyone in the country, on the left or the right, that still has a shred of respect for Lindsey Graham?

Hell, does Lindsey Graham still have a shred of respect for Lindsey Graham?

The second topic is decidedly non-political and actually comes as a reader request:  tell us how you came up with your username/moniker.

Those comments aren’t gonna write themselves, so get to it, peeps.

311 Comments

Filed under GTP Stuff

311 responses to “Your 1.9.19 Playpen

  1. Aladawg

    Moved to Alabama after graduating for second degree in 82. Been there almost alll since. Got transferred to Ky for 10 years after the name. Retired to Alabama coast 4 years ago. Thus Ala dawg.

    Like

  2. Derek

    Mrs. Graham (R-SC) did have one day of clarity: https://youtu.be/mx6WzrcfoZI

    Like

  3. Mick Foley was both Dude Love and Mankind. I combined the two. I have no idea why since I stopped watching wrestling when I was a teen.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Mg4life0331

    Machine gunner 4 life. Uncle sams misguided children. Rah.

    Like

  5. Mayor

    What “legal reforms” are Sen. Graham talking about? Beuhler?

    Like

  6. artful codger

    Artful Dodger originally references the pickpocket in Oliver Twist. It was then picked up and used as a nickname for the Brooklyn Dodgers in the ’50s. I substituted codger as I am nearing retirement age.

    Like

  7. VoxDawg

    Based Lindsey Graham is a damned patriot. I can’t speak to his history before his handler from AZ exited the stage (we don’t say his name), but he’s solid now, IMO.

    User name comes from 2nd career as a voice actor.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Surgically attaching his lips to Trump’s rectum doesn’t make Graham a patriot. I’ll reserve judgment on whether it makes him damned, though.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Cojones

        Looks like he’s trying to make the Clemson praise come true today since he’s working with others to end this shit-storm shutdown. He goes back and forth so much that his party loyalty ass-kissing becomes entangled with his dick when “trying to move ahead”. We should find out soon whether he thinks more of his party than his country with the Mueller report.

        Like

    • RandallPinkFloyd

      “If it ain’t that piece of paper, there’s some other choice they’re gonna try and make for you. You gotta do what Randall Pink Floyd wants to do man. Let me tell you this, the older you do get the more rules they’re gonna try to get you to follow. You just gotta keep livin’ man, L-I-V-I-N.”

      Like

    • Derek

      Try this voice over out Vox:

      “In a world where Lindsay Graham calls trump a kook, crazy and unfit for office, he later becomes a defender of the kook, the crazy and the unfit, and all is well.”

      Liked by 1 person

    • TomReagan

      Why don’t you say his name?

      Character from Miller’s Crossing.

      Like

      • Outstanding film. And in my view these Trump-zombies prefer to forget McCain because he represented someone who acted on his conscience and offered his opinions, not Groupthink. It’s simpler to get in line, even if you’re headed for the cliff.

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    • ChiliDawg

      Amazing how many of you have re-defined “patriotism” as servility to the will of a corrupt authoritarian whose only agenda is to destroy the Democratic institutions that have formed the bedrock of the Republic since it’s birth.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Derek

        It’s what George Washington would have done. Real patriots got in line behind King George.

        Liked by 1 person

      • ChiliDawg

        But I’ll add – anybody who refers to Lindsey Graham as a “patriot” while talking down about John McCain is a fucking idiot. And it says a lot about you and your ilk that you’ve all so gleefully turned to talking shit about a literal goddamned American war hero because President Bone-spurs didn’t like that he had integrity and couldn’t be bullied into submission.

        Liked by 1 person

        • RangerRuss

          Read what Eric Haney has to say about McCain and his treatment of the left behind POWs and their families. Then you’ll understand why former SOF types were less than lukewarm towards McCain. LG is a shithead as are most politicians.

          Like

          • Derek

            At least he didn’t think they weren’t heroes because they got captured. How do you get away with that shit? Imagine that utterance coming out of Obama’s mouth for just a moment.

            Liked by 1 person

          • ilini84

            Yea and then read about that scumbag Ted Sampley.

            Like

          • ChiliDawg

            Isn’t it funny how Republicans had nothing but praise for John McCain until the day he refused to call Obama a muslim?

            You’re all disgusting.

            Like

            • Napoleon BonerFart

              I’m not a Republican, but screw McCain. He was a warmonger responsible for countless deaths.

              Like

              • ChiliDawg

                It is not physically possible for me to think any less of you than I already do – so your weak-ass trolling is rather wasted. Find someone who doesn’t already know you’re a waste of oxygen.

                Like

                • Napoleon BonerFart

                  Well, you’ve convinced me. Only true patriots want to use American troops as cannon fodder in service of killing millions of brown people. We may be at war in the Middle East for another hundred years. Hell, make it two hundred. USA! USA!

                  I guess he was right both times.

                  Like

          • TomReagan

            *** Read what Eric Haney has to say about McCain and his treatment of the left behind POWs and their families. ***

            Read what several of those who served with Eric Haney have to say about him. And those are just the ones who felt the need to go on the record about him.

            I’m an outsider and – like nearly all Americans – don’t know the true story behind these things, but I’m giving the nod to McCain in this battle of integrity.

            Like

      • Napoleon BonerFart

        Right. Trump relaxed some EPA restrictions on property rights. The Sons of Liberty would be spinning in their graves at the notion of less government control over people. What a dictator!

        Like

        • Well, he’ll need to steamroll property rights to have any semblance of a “wall”. Which is why I believe this entire charade is another smokescreen to take the bright lights off the facts of his election fraud.

          Liked by 1 person

      • SpellDawg

        Honestly, fuck patriotism; fuck blind loyalty, absolvable ethics, and that damned shame you are supposed to feel if you don’t bow in fealty at every opportunity. Every country has it’s patriots, only one country has Americans. If the Founding Fathers are your touchstone, my stance is that of a true American.

        I have generations of family that served, lost one to an IED in whatever the fuck we were doing in Iraq the second time, he left 3 toddlers behind. I stopped standing and clapping at that point. I buy the drinks and listen to the tales of friends who have served or are still enlisted. I try to listen without prodding, they share what they want and I show them my respect without judgment. Several have seen the most horrific shit happen to their buddies, most are battling substance abuse, their sacrifice will continue on for the length of their days.

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        • Napoleon BonerFart

          It’s a tragedy. But I don’t really blame the poor saps who are the boots on the ground. They bought into the mythology that they’re keeping the nation safe and free. I blame the brass and the politicians of the National Security State who conspire to keep them there.

          Like

          • SpellDawg

            I’d like to see any politician who votes for war be given a one month paid leave of to serve alongside the triage doctors and nurses. Let them see the consequences of the button they pushed.

            Like

    • J-DawG

      I am a proud member of the tribe. (Hebrew, that is) Also a life long fan of UGA with my oldest holding a degree from UGA. Hence: J-Dawg.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. 79Dawg

    No post on us being tied with Florida in the final AP poll and behind them in the final coaches poll?

    Like

  9. Before I had kids (or back when I had free time), I used to run a UGA blog called Blogging Pantsless (BP). My pledge name was Mackie.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. FisheriesDawg

    I’m not even sure Lindsey Graham’s live-in boyfriend in Charleston respects him at this point. He’s twisted himself in so many directions trying to be a populist that I’m not sure he knows which way is up. It’s sad to watch otherwise competent elected officials make fools of themselves trying to appeal to Trump’s base. Here’s a hint, Lindsey: they hate you and they always will. Quit trying and just be yourself.

    Majored in Fisheries at Georgia. Duh.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Derek

      He just wants to be re-elected. Politics is pretty simple when you realize that all they really want is the job. The rest is up to us.

      Like

      • FisheriesDawg

        Of course. Ideally, politicians should want to be re-elected but not at the expense of their reputations. Sort of a “I’d like to serve so long as you’ll have me” kind of approach.

        I’d probably be terrible in office because I’d be too quick to tell voters that they’d better vote for someone else if they want [insert ill-informed, short-sighted policy here].

        In other words: Cincinnatus, bitches.

        Like

        • Thorn Dawg

          Term limits would solve this issue.

          Like

          • FisheriesDawg

            No, term limits wouldn’t. All they would do is reward the dishonest rent-seekers and prevent us from returning true public servants. For instance, in Georgia, Johnny Isakson is one of those.

            Like

          • Derek

            Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

            H.L. Mencken

            The problem with this as a solution is that it simply passes greater power to un-elected bureaucrats. Our elected officials need time to figure out how things work to be effective.

            The other thing it does is presuppose that democracy sucks because the people inherently pick poorly. True or not, I’d rather be governed by our choices than be ruled. At least in that way we have the opportunity to start choosing more wisely.

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    • The main thing about Graham is what you say: He has tied himself in so many knots, he has no clue as which way is up, down, or all around. And if need be, he will change his direction once again. And the more he changes, the more he is disliked.
      Alamosa is Spanish for cottonwood and a town in Colorado: One of my college stays(BA) was in Alamosa. Lovely little town, colder than all get out in the winter, but perpetual sunshine.

      Like

  11. Normaltown Mike

    I first had an office in Normaltown and then ended up buying a house in the greater Normaltown MSA.

    This was before Normaltown became a trendy hipster enclave, which is fine by me.

    Like

    • Russ

      So…about 50 years ago? Because it was trendy when I was in school in the late 70’s, and probably before that.

      Not that there’s anything wrong with that. Places are trendy/popular for a reason. Usually it’s because it’s a nice place.

      Like

      • Normaltown Mike

        So Normal Bar, Hi-Lo Bar, The Old Pal Bar, Ike and Jane’s and Automatic Pizza were there 40 years ago?

        Who knew!

        Like

        • Got Cowdog

          Was Allen’s considered Normaltown? If so I should possibly change my moniker to “the Normaltown Squatter”.

          Like

        • Russ

          So, it’s trendier now. But Allen’s (and whatever that bar was underneath) was trendy when I was there. Doesn’t mean I didn’t go quite often. I actually like trendy places. The Normaltown Flyers (great, great band) were pretty trendy, too.

          Again, nothing against it. I’ve just always thought Normaltown was trendy. I’d live there too if I was in Athens. Well, I guess I would. I haven’t been in a while.

          Like

    • ilini84

      We’ve been her for 20+ years and, yea, it’s changed but I don’t think for the worse. There are tons of families and kids here now and Reptar was hopefully the last band that will love on our block. I do miss the bugle from the Navy School but the Normaltown business area is way better now.

      Like

  12. Salty Dawg

    I live in SW FL close to the beach, and love to saltwater fish! I like freshwater and brackish water ok, but Gulf fishing is for me!

    Like

    • ilini84

      Me too even. though the overfishing has resulted in such limits. When I started fishing down there people wouldn’t even keep AJ’s, (my cat wouldn’t eat that shit!) now they are really restricted.

      Like

    • Illini84

      I just took a charter in 10,000 Islands last month. It was my first encounter with a snook. . . holy shit!

      Like

      • Got Cowdog

        I had a place in Hudson, Fla for 15 years or so, sold it in 14. We fished snook during the season all along the mangrove canals and sandbars, they are still one of my favorite not only to fish for but to eat.
        Having a snook that you didn’t see bust a topwater is a sight to behold. It looks like your lure hit an underwater mine and exploded. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • ilini84

          I hit one with a jig and a piece of shrimp on light tackle and I was amazed at it’s strength. It spit the hook when I turned it but still. . .

          Like

  13. JoshG

    I’m still blown away anyone respects any politician at all. We act like one is better than another.

    Like

    • Russ

      A-freakin’-men!
      I’m a gov’t contractor and watching the gov’t shut down ~ every 5 years over some idiotic temper tantrum is infuriating. Some politician is claiming to save a dime while spending dollars on back wages, cleanup costs, extra work and whatever all trying to fix the mess caused by the shutdown.

      Oh, and my parents chose my moniker about 60 years ago. I’m just not that creative/don’t care.

      Like

      • dawgtor

        I think that this idea is insidious and has been intentionally promoted in our country. With all of the power-mongering in our country, there are going to be corrupt politicians. The issue is not that they exist, but that we have started to ignore it when it occurs instead of weeding it out. This is how a garden/government gets overrun. It is easy to feel disempowered in our society today, but I think that the most corrupt powers that be want you to express exactly the sentiment you are expressing. It benefits them. Don’t tolerate it. If you see it, vote against it. All politicians are not the same regardless of party. If you’re a democrat, there are republicans with more integrity than some democrats and vice versa. The main problem is being conditioned to simply accept unethical behavior because of an overgeneralization. There most certainly are good politicians with good intentions and casting them aside hurts us all.

        Like

    • Derek

      So Abraham Lincoln = Louie Gohmert?

      Like

    • Butler Reynolds

      I like the way you talk.

      Like

  14. Chopdawg

    Braves fan and part-time employee; Dawg fan and full-time alum.

    Love the blog, Senator, even if I don’t always get the points of your posts. Thanx for keeping it going.

    Like

  15. Blinding Whiff

    My friend had a bad band with a dumb name. He asked me to come up with an alternative name. The band didn’t accept it, so now it’s mine.

    Like

  16. KornDawg

    I’m a fan of 90’s rock, and “Alice in Chains Dawg” didn’t have the same ring to it. But I do like corndogs, as well.
    Not because I wanted Willie Korn to sign with UGA.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. ChiliDawg

    Watching sycophants like Lindsey Graham, who have twisted themselves in knots to defend baby Mussolini, go down with the ship as the MAGA-cult comes unglued is going to be the highlight of 2019.

    Like

    • Derek

      You think Manafort sharing internal polling with a Russian spy is like a big deal? Seriously? Treason is pretty pedestrian.

      Now lying about oral sex? That’s worthy of upsetting the will of the majority.

      Liked by 1 person

      • ChiliDawg

        “There was no collusion!”

        “Well maybe there was but it’s not a crime!”

        “Okay so TECHNICALLY it might be a crime but it’s MINOR, like jaywalking!”

        “BUT HER EMAILS”

        Liked by 1 person

        • Derek

          Some people aren’t stupid. They’re brain damaged.

          Why would a Russian spy want to know about American voter preference? What’s the innocent reason?

          Like

          • Napoleon BonerFart

            I’m just so triggered that it’s possible that the Kremlin learned the Top Secret Classified information that Hillary is an unpopular bitch. Think of the damage they could do with that information!!11!

            Like

        • Napoleon BonerFart

          Exactly. The hard evidence of the Russian collusion is safely tucked away next to the evidence of WMD in Iraq in James Clapper’s basement. But you can trust him this time.

          Like

        • Derek

          I mean talking total fucking brainless troglodytes.

          Like

      • Napoleon BonerFart

        Internal polling?!?!?!! Holy shit!!! How will the republic recover?

        Keep holding your breath until Trump’s out. It was going to be 2017, and then 2018, but it’s definitely going to be 2019. For sure. Absolutely.

        Like

  18. Hogbody Spradlin

    Hogbody Spradlin is one of Lewis Grizzard’s (fictional?) fraternity brothers.
    There’s a reason he didn’t mind people calling him Hogbody to his face: his real name is Norbert.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. ilini84

    WordPress is so wonky that sometimes my name gets changed without me doing it. A couple of years ago some people thought I was trying to pull a fast one but that ain’t the case.

    Like

  20. mwo

    I played on a softball team in Walton county. Teams name was MWO for Monroe World Order. Started by a bunch of wwe fans.

    Like

  21. ASEF

    Always Someone Else’s Fault. Reflection and accountability are lost commodities these days. I got tired of typing it out on my mobile, so it became ASEF.

    Graham obviously got some polling data that showed he was MAGA toast in his next primary. So, he jumped in front of that parade in SC. Watching Lindsey flip from wannabe Sage and Wise Centrist Statesman to Rabid Trumper was one of the comedy highlights of 2018.

    Like

  22. ChiliDawg

    ChiliDawg isn’t a reference to a hot dog with meat and beans on it, but rather to my business – which is the import, manufacture and sale of spices. Chili (or red pepper) is one of our highest volume items.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Salty Dawg

      Thanks, Chili, for the explanation. I thought it was the other kind of chili, which makes me think of the greasy V and how I would devour one right now if I had one!

      Like

    • ChiliDawg: Thanks, always thought it had to do with chili. Many years ago I saw a bottle of hot sauce on a shelf-listed as the hottest one they had- was labeled scorned woman.

      Like

  23. Gravidy

    I have one of the dumbest usernames here and, not surprisingly, the backstory is just as dumb.

    Eons ago, when the Internet and email addresses were being invented, I thought I’d come up with an obscure, geeky name for my email address. “Gravid” is just another name for “pregnant”. I added the Y at the end to make it an adjective. Since I’ve always been a rather plump human, I decided to make fun of myself, and it has stuck with me in one form or another for almost 30 years.

    Liked by 2 people

  24. Nickname from college, play on my name, and I used to follow the Dawgs way harder than I do now.

    Like

  25. Rchris

    I think it was Benjamin Franklin who said “If we don’t hang together we will all hang seperately.” That is still so true today. We as a country desperately need to find a way to have a reasoned, good-faith dialectic to build consensus on which path to take.

    Like

    • Anonymous

      I have a very simple solution for that, but I don’t think people will agree to it. Most people (around 65% or so) do not evaluate political ideas based on the outcome expected by experts. They support an idea / proposal because it makes them feel like they are a good person. Since they think they have good intentions, they feel like the people who disagree with them must have bad intentions. They then ascribe those intentions to others. This applies to both the left, the right, moderates, and even a decent amount of libertarians. Those on the left feel like they are good people for supporting tolerance, diversity, and “the marginalized”. Those on the right feel like they are good people for supporting traditional values, family, and American exceptionalism. This is why every is either a “Racist Nazi Bigot” or an “America-hating Commie Terrorist Sympathizer”.

      If we want the country to function properly, the people that ascribe intentions on to others need to voluntarily leave decision making to people that are more rational and can evaluate things based on cost-benefit analysis. Sadly, this will never happen.

      Like

      • stoopnagle

        I disagree. I think the fundamental problem is stupid people don’t know what they don’t know and think they know something. Applies universally. The ascribing negative traits is universal – that’s never going away. And one person’s reasoned judgement is another’s jackassery.

        Know-it-all-ism is the true problem. And the supreme example of this lack of humility is tweeting something moronic while simultaneously undoing generations of good work right…. now. (probably)

        Liked by 1 person

        • Anonymous

          You could be right, but the cognitive scientists say you are wrong. I also believe this is the very reason we now have fake news and “alternative facts. People believe the set of “facts” that make them feel like they are good people.

          I would also add that the supreme example of this would be using moronic tweets to manipulate the populace for political posturing. You don’t find it odd that he can somehow tweet the dumbest shit yet he keeps getting what he wants? IMHO, Trump and Alexandria Ocasio Cortez are the smart ones that realize that facts do not matter to most people.

          Like

          • stoopnagle

            How about this: I partially agree. People are unaware of their ignorance and want to feel good about themselves, etc etc.

            Like

            • Anonymous

              Yes, the Dunning-Kruger Effect is in full force, but I think ignorance is a main contributor as to why people don’t recognize they are falling for emotional non-arguments instead of reasoned logic.

              Like

      • Napoleon BonerFart

        I think you’re half right. But the Dunning-Kruger effect applies to the experts as well. Nobody predicted the 2008 financial crash. And the solution of the experts was a massive bipartisan rent-seeking plan.

        On a complex situation like climate change, most of the experts advocate for actions that would bankrupt the world. Al Gore histrionically says we have to get rid of fossil fuels entirely. Even more reasoned experts advocate for remediation that may ultimately cost more than doing nothing.

        Ultimately, it’s too easy for experts to take chances with other people’s money. When it’s your skin in the game, you’re going to be more careful. And as smart as experts are, none of them are as smart as everybody else put together. That’s the beauty of markets. Even when markets get things wrong, at least people are making mistakes with their own money. That’s at least more moral than risking your neighbor’s wealth.

        Like

        • Rchris

          Very well said.

          Like

        • dawgtor

          What exactly would convince you that there is a major upside to shifting the economy toward more environmentally-friendly technology and businesses? Climate change is costing us a lot and is on track to cost much more.
          https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/heres-how-much-climate-change-could-cost-the-u-s/
          It most certainly would cause another shift in our economy. With the tech shift of the last few decades driving a lot of today’s angst, it would leave another generation of workers to be fooled into blaming immigrants… But it wouldn’t tank the economy, especially if we led the charge, developed the tech and sold it to other countries while refusing to trade with them if they didn’t have something similar. I think that not changing our approach, worsening the problem, and relying on foreign scientists to fix it will also hurt our country. Markets are a reflection of current profitability and not an all-seeing prophet. If nobody predicted the market crash and it happened suddenly, wouldn’t a crash precipitated by climate change already be too late? I’m a big believer in research and if we aren’t going to change regulations to combat climate change, then we should at least be throwing money at solutions to it.

          Like

  26. jollyrogerjay

    “jollyrogerjay”…I owned a bar/restaurant for 10 years on the west end of Panama City Beach at the foot of the Philip’s Inlet Bridge..”The Jolly Roger Grill.” Sold the property to a condo developer in 2005 and retired to golfin’, fishin’, and fu…’ .

    Liked by 2 people

  27. F250Dawg

    I drive a Ford F250 and I’m UGA class of 1986 therefore F250Dawg

    Liked by 1 person

  28. 86BONE

    Some Varsity Lettermen at UGA would have a BONE license plate on their vehicles followed with their jersey number. I caught a lot of flack back in the day as I kept that plate on my vehicles long after graduation and some women didn’t quite “get it”!! Can you guess what number I wore?
    Graduated in ‘86…there is my handle.

    As for Senator Graham…they are ALL full of shit in DC and nothing that comes out of their mouths shocks me these days!

    Liked by 1 person

  29. sidewalkalumni

    Me, my twin sister, and my older brother were the only ones in the entire family line to not attend UGA (grew up on Hawthorne, moved to Oconee County, and wanted to see somewhere new so I went to Georgia Southern). Was going to UGA games since I was a twinkle is my parents eyes and could never shake it even while in Statesboro (BVG was our HC my freshman year, so can you blame me?). I’ve never received one alumni donation call from GA Southern since graduating, so I donate to the Hartman Fund each year instead to keep tickets that have been passed down through the family for years.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Texas Dawg

    I keep it simple. An ’85 DAWG relocated to Texas for the last 16 years

    Liked by 1 person

  31. back9k9

    Back9k9. Love golf. Love the dawgs.

    As for Lindsey Graham. Don’t care for most politicians in general. He’s certainly one of those.Thought he stood up for good during the Kavanaugh hearings. Other than that, meh.

    Like

  32. Derek

    As to the name, the idea of creating a pseudonym just never feels right to me. Not sure why, but I can’t ever be happy with any of my terrible ideas for them.

    Any suggestions? I’d be more inclined to accept one that’s particularly insulting, self-depreciating and rude.

    Do your worst!

    Like

  33. LakeOconeeDawg

    My company built a satellite location in Greensboro 20 years ago. I jumped up and down for the chance to relocate there. So here I am…..

    Like

  34. Mary Kate Danaher

    The great John Wayne/Maureen O’Hara film, “The Quiet Man”, of course.

    Like

  35. spottieottie

    Graham has gotten particularly sycophant-y after McCain died.

    As for the username, I’ll just leave this here:

    Like

  36. DoubleDawg1318

    I have an undergraduate and graduate degree from UGA. The 13 and 18 are my class years. I have considered changing the moniker so I have one handle across all my blog memberships.

    Like

  37. Clayton Davis

    Sheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeiiiiiiiit.

    Like

  38. Bard Parker

    I’m a surgeon and Bard Parker makes scalpels

    Like

  39. Sanford222view

    Mine is just related to the section location of some of my seats in Sanford stadium.

    Like

  40. Location of residence…….

    Like

  41. Reverend Whitewall

    Reverend Whitewall came from my buddy LCUGA (you’ll see him commenting here from time to time – his son was the one who recently met Nick Chubb, Bluto posted about it here). LC is one of those guys who has a nickname for everybody.

    Back in our time at UGA, I was active in campus ministries. Also during that time, I had to get new tires, and the dang place put them on with the whitewalls out. I had to get to class and didn’t have time for them to flip them correctly that day, so for a day or two I was driving around with whitewall tires. Of course my buddies got a kick out of this, and LC dubbed me “Reverend Whitewall” in a group email we had going (this was before the days of texts/group texts). And it’s just one of those things that’s stuck around as an inside joke from college days.

    Like

  42. Anonymous

    The only thing I ever liked about Mrs. Graham is that he has lessened as a warmonger now that John McCain’s brain tumor earned the Nobel Peace Prize.

    With the speeches last night by Trump, Schumer, and Pelosi, let’s talk about “The Wall”.

    Firstly, is the wall “ineffective” or “immoral”? If it is ineffective, it can’t really be immoral as it would just be a waste of money.

    Chuck Shumer (along with Hillary Clinton and Barak Obama) voted for the Secure Fence Act of 2006. That act funded the construction of 654 miles of fencing along the border (much of it is 18-26 feet in height). Why is Trump’s proposal “immoral and racist” whereas the fence was not? Is it the extra 350 miles? Is it the height? Is it the sturdiness of construction?

    When Felipe Calderón took over as President of Mexico from Vicente Fox, the Mexican Government, at various levels, began high level corruption and coordination with the Zeta Cartel. When the other cartels realized that the Zeta’s were getting arrested / prosecuted at a rate 95% less that the others, extraordinary levels of violence ensued in the battle between the cartels. Since then, the corruption has gotten much worse.

    The former Attorney General of Nayarit has pled guilty to conspiring with cartels to operate a criminal enterprise. There is overwhelming evidence that much of the Mexican Federal Government has been compromised and that most of the border territory is actually controlled by the cartels. In this sense, would we be building a wall between us and Mexico or would it be a wall between us and the drug cartels? Is it immoral to build a wall between us and the drug cartels?

    links:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secure_Fence_Act_of_2006
    https://www.govtrack.us/congress/votes/109-2006/s262
    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-mexico-drugs-idUSKBN170397
    https://www.justice.gov/usao-edny/pr/former-mexican-state-attorney-general-pleads-guilty-international-narcotics

    Like

    • The wall is simply political theater. Trump doesn’t care about the wall. He just wants a fight over the wall to gin up support from his base.

      If the wall were really that important to him, he’d make a deal by giving the Democrats something they really wanted in return, like DACA. Oh, wait…

      Liked by 3 people

      • Anonymous

        I think you are completely wrong about this. The wall was basically the center-piece of his campaign. It is one of the main reasons why he got so much of the working-class vote. He also basically considers himself to be “Negotiator-in-Chief”.

        My understanding is that Nancy Pelosi is the holdup and is planning on spending the next two years focusing on the 2020 election. From what I am hearing, Schumer is ready to negotiate and Trump is willing to give up a good bit more than DACA (which he and almost everyone supports anyway) to get it. His problem before was that it was other Republicans that were obstructing him. He can fight now because he is fighting Pelosi and Schumer instead Mitch McConnell.

        Most people support DACA, increasing worker visas, and something akin to the Simpson–Mazzoli Act. The issue is that they don’t want to be in the same situation 20 years from now passing a third round of amnesty. This should be really easy. They should agree to let DHS, Border Patrol, and engineers design a system, including border fencing / walls, that would be deemed suitable for border security and that something like Simpso-Mazzoli will go into effect when the system is implemented. This should not be hard, but our system is broken.

        Like

        • They had a deal on DACA for $25 billion in wall funding. Trump changed his mind and walked away.

          My understanding is that Nancy Pelosi is the holdup…

          Trump literally said on national television he would be proud to take full responsibility for the shutdown.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Derek

            Facts are not what they do.

            The daca for a fully funded wall deal was there. Trump passed.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Anonymous

            They had a deal on DACA for $25 billion in wall funding. Trump changed his mind and walked away.

            I had not heard that. Please provide a link from a reputable source.

            Trump literally said on national television he would be proud to take full responsibility for the shutdown.

            Here is a transcript of his speech. Please show where he said that.

            http://time.com/5497569/donald-trump-oval-office-address-transcript/

            I will note the following from his speech:

            The federal government remains shut down for one reason and one reason only: because Democrats will not fund border security.
            My administration is doing everything in our power to help those impacted by the situation. But the only solution is for Democrats to pass a spending bill that defends our borders and re-opens the government.
            This situation could be solved in a 45-minute meeting. I have invited Congressional leadership to the White House tomorrow to get this done. Hopefully, we can rise above partisan politics in order to support national security.

            Like

            • Dial this clip up to the 1:30 mark.

              As far as the DACA deal goes, here’s one summary. Basically, Trump was interested in it until Steven Miller convinced him not to give up his DACA bargaining chip unless he got significant changes to legal immigration along with the wall.

              Like

              • Anonymous

                Thank you for the link. I had not seen this video or read the transcript. Apparently that was on Dec 16. I was out of town at the time and missed that in news. That shows that If he can get Pelsoi to show up for sincere negotiations and he can’t get it done, he has admitted it will be 100% his fault.

                As for the DACA deal, I meant a link showing that the Democrats had reached and agreement with Trump about DACA for the wall. I think I didn’t make my point very clear. I was hypothesizing that he is abandoning negotiating with McConnell and is instead trying to make a deal with Schumer and Pelosi. If they can make a deal, they can all put the onus on Senate Republicans to accept.

                Like

                • That shows that If he can get Pelsoi to show up for sincere negotiations and he can’t get it done, he has admitted it will be 100% his fault.

                  I must have missed where he said “if Nancy doesn’t, then…”.

                  Like

                • dawgtor

                  What happened was there was an agreement for 25bn for the wall in exchange for DACA. After that wrangling took place, Trump insisted on adding numerical immigration reform (and a pony!). At that point, democrats balked, shut down the government for a few days, then jettisoned the whole thing.
                  https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2018/02/07/what-president-trumps-policy-dreamers-keeps-changing/312783002/
                  If democrats gave in to Trump’s demands, why wouldn’t he just do the same thing to ram through anything he wants? It would be an incredible surrender of power. Further, republicans had full control in 2018, the senate passed a budget bill 100-0 and ryan wouldn’t bring it up in the house for a vote. Now, the exact same bill gets passed by the house in 2019 and mcconnell wont bring it up in the senate. This is wholly gamesmanship by the republicans. Their behavior is egregious. The republicans’ drive to actively create problems then try to pin them on democrats is both obvious and concerning. “The buck stops with everybody” DJT 1/10/2019. Please open your eyes.
                  Also, this whataboutism about supporting the wall in 2006…please think about context. The peak of illegal immigration at the southern border was in 1999-2000. Then 9/11 and all of the fear about terrorism. A wall actually made some sense at that point both politically and practically. Now, we are at a 45 year low for illegal immigration and the most obvious places to build a wall have been covered. Are we supposed to build a wall on our side of the Rio Grande? It seems stupid to me, but I am willing to change my mind if independent analysis says that it will be a cost effective way to stem illegal immigration. If a study is done and it isn’t, would you change your mind? At this point, experts have already said it’s a foolish idea.

                  Like

            • spottieottie

              I wouldn’t take anything out of Donald Trump’s mouth at face value. Dude once tried to convince people he turned down Selma Hayek because she was “too short.”

              Liked by 1 person

            • Shoot him over a source from “The Western Journal”!

              Like

        • My understanding is that Nancy Pelosi is the holdup and is planning on spending the next two years focusing on the 2020 election. From what I am hearing, Schumer is ready to negotiate and Trump is willing to give up a good bit more than DACA (which he and almost everyone supports anyway) to get it.

          Except for that little detail about Republicans having complete control of both the legislative and executive branches the last two years and could have funded with wall without a single Democrat vote, you may have a point about Pelosi being the holdup here. If they wanted to build the wall, they could have. The Senator is 100% correct that this is nothing more than theater to rile up the base.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Derek

            There is filibuster but the offer walls wall for existing policy on DACA and he passed. Now that the Democrats have real power that wouldn’t be enough. That’s why it hasn’t been offered.

            The Democrats are happy to watch the fire burn until 11/20.

            Like

          • Anonymous

            Senate Republicans, namely Mitch McConnell, were obstructing him before. Now that the Democrats have control of the House, he can show more fight. Most of the big money Republican donors like having the open border because they like the pseduo-slave labor that can’t run to the government to report abuses.

            Liked by 1 person

        • spottieottie

          “My understanding is that Nancy Pelosi is the holdup”

          My understanding is that Nancy Pelosi wasn’t the one who rejected $25 billion in wall funding and border security measures in exchange for a path to citizenship for DACA kids.

          This is probably a good time to remember that the Senate passed a short term spending bill 100-0 back on December 19 that would have kept the government open. Before it could be taken up by the House (where it had the votes), Trump got spooked by the outrage from a certain obese Fentanyl addict and assorted ghouls on Fox News and support caved. Instead, the House passed a spending bill with Trump’s required $5 billion in wall funding that Paul Ryan – with one foot out the door – knew wouldn’t pass the Senate.

          The person who matters here is McConnell. The votes are there in the Senate to pass one of the House’s clean spending bills. He’s stopping those from seeing the floor.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Anonymous

            The person who matters here is McConnell. The votes are there in the Senate to pass one of the House’s clean spending bills. He’s stopping those from seeing the floor.

            Yes, that is exactly my point. I think y’all are missing my point. Let me explain:

            The Republicans didn’t pass anything when Republicans had full control of the congress due to Republican obstruction mainly from McConnell. I think that Trump is now trying to make a deal with the Democrats and NOT the Republicans. If he can make that deal, then He and Schumer can put the onus on McConnell to bring the new deal he made with the Democrats to a vote. That moves the narrative. My understanding is that Schumer is on board with that plan and is ready to make a deal and that Nancy Pelosi is not.

            When I was asking for a link for the DACA for the wall deal, I was asking for a link detailing where House Democrats agreed to it, not the former deal with Republicans that fell through.

            Like

            • spottieottie

              Republican obstruction mainly from McConnell.

              You keep using that word, I do not think it means what you think it means.

              McConnell didn’t scuttle the $25 billion in border funding. Trump did that. McConnell wasn’t the one who imploded the Dec. 19 spending bill in the House. Trump did that. McConnell wasn’t the one who rejected the Pence-negotiated $2-ish million in wall funding. Trump did that.

              McConnell doesn’t want this shutdown. He sure as shoot doesn’t want to waste this much political capital on an incredibly unpopular border wall that is the pet project of an unpopular President. But he also doesn’t want to piss of the guy responsible for nominating the legions of conservative judges McConnell wants to see on the bench. At some point, McConnell is going to be pushed into the fore, at this point he’s just trying to keep Cheeto Mussolini happy so the whole Federalist society judge pipeline can keep flowing.

              Like

              • Anonymous

                When Trump derailed the deal back in March, you can put the blame on Trump for trying to get too much. I’m talking about obstruction during the fall and post election period. They had the deal before. Why couldn’t they pass the deal before the new congress?

                I should also remind that I am not a Trump supporter and did not vote for him.

                Like

        • Friend, your FIRST paragraph exactly mirrors Blutarsky’s supposition!

          Like

  43. vectordawg

    I’m an air traffic controller. Therefore, vectordawg!

    Like

    • Are the planes gonna need a LOT more separation next Tuesday… wink, wink…nod, nod? A lot of folks are counting on you guys. It may be the only think that gets noticed otherwise.

      Like

      • vectordawg

        Naa, most of us are professionals! Getting people to come to work may be a problem. Backpay for furloughed employees is expected so a lot of folks are just laying out of work. “Free leave” is the current catchphrase!

        Like

        • Russ

          Clarification. Back pay for furloughed Civil Servants is expected. Contractors are screwed, again. My option is that my company will allow me to take LWOP once our funding runs out.

          Liked by 1 person

          • That sucks. What angers me is that the media always keys in on trash piling up at the national parks during a shutdown as if that is the highest cost. If the average citizen knew how much of their tax dollars were wasted over the last three weeks they would be pissed. Instead we get feel good stories of volunteers picking up said trash…which inclines people to think this isn’t a big deal.

            Like

  44. Butler Reynolds

    I never knew that Lindsey Graham ever had any respect to lose in the first place. I’ve just always been surprised that the voters of South Carolina were cool with electing a gay man (albeit closeted) for their senator.
    Moniker: https://goo.gl/maps/JPzfXXZQomG2

    Like

  45. stoopnagle

    Lindsey Graham is a tool sans spine.

    My father-in-law called our coonhound “Stoopnagle”. He got it from an old radio comedy show:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stoopnagle_and_Budd

    Like

  46. Uglydawg.

    https://getyarn.io/yarn-clip/a3f5dd4d-c997-4798-8976-f2acbd5bfad0
    Acutally, I’m of very average looks (ymmv on this) and it describes my occasional behavior more than my physical appearance.

    Like

  47. CB

    CB stands for Coach Blades. Blades is a dumb nickname that arose when I tried to snowboard once and kept falling so I switched back to skis, but I use the little snowblade skis bc they’re easier to navigate with imo. Mockery ensued.

    Coach because since 2013 I’ve been coaching either basketball or weightlifting at a Macon juco.

    Anyway Coach Blades is a stupid name so I just use the initials.

    I’m not a CB radio tech.

    Like

  48. Ben

    Here’s the thing about Lindsay: he’s an spineless, opportunistic shill. If anyone, on either side, has any respect left for that guy, I question their ability to judge anyone’s character. For me, I finally realized that about him when he decked himself out in Clemson gear to go and see them after their prior championship win. The guy went to USC for undergrad and law school, and yet, in order to curry favor and votes, he sells out to get close to a winner. It was really weird to see, but in hindsight, not unexpected at all.

    My handle is completely uncreative – it’s what people call me everyday.

    Liked by 1 person

  49. Got Cowdog

    I am a Dawg fan and a dog fan. I have a working Blue Heeler, also known as an Australian cattle dog, Cowdog for short. Hence Got Cowdog.

    Like

    • Salty Dawg

      I lost my Australian Kelpie of 13 years, in ’17. The cattle dog breed is an awesome breed and smart as a whip. She was not a working dog, but a rescue from Hurricane Charlie. Great respect and love for them!

      Like

      • Got Cowdog

        Sorry you lost your pup. I love watching mine work, it sure isn’t the same style as the Border Collies you see in videos making hearts out of herds of sheep. It’s much more bitey and snarly, at least until the objects of her attention figure out that resistance is not only futile but painful as well. Now all I have to do is let her out of the truck and the cows adopt the “I don’t have to outrun the dog, I just have to outrun you” philosophy and woe be unto the stragglers, last one in the barn gets it’s ass bit. She is also loyal to a fault, unless Got Sr. offers a ride to the beer store, ’cause if she goes in and sits in front of the counter she gets a Slim Jim.

        Liked by 2 people

  50. Stumpy Pepys

    Nom de guerre in honor of John “Stumpy” Pepys (1943-1969), the first drummer for the legendary band Spinal Tap. Spinal Tap co-founders David St. Hubbins and Nigel Tufnel met the tall, blond geek in 1964 while touring as members of the Johnny Goodshow Revue. At a Southampton pub then known as the Bucket, the boys jammed with the bespectacled drummer, nicknamed “the peeper” and then a member of the Leslie Cheswick Soul Explosion. The three men would go on to form the Thamesmen and later, Spinal Tap, which played its first gig in December 1966. Pepys would die in a bizarre gardening accident shortly after the release of the band’s third album, “Silent But Deadly.”

    Like

  51. Debby Balcer

    1st question no and I am a SC voter. Bye bye Lindsay the people who used to respect you don’t and the ones you are trying to win don’t like you either.

    I was green enough to the internet to use my own name

    Like

  52. ugafidelis

    USMC (ret) and always faithful to the Dawgs.

    Semperugafidelis just didn’t quite roll off the tongue.

    Liked by 1 person

  53. I’ve had this same user name for all the places I comment (and Twitter) for about 12 years now. Pretty straightforward story – before I got into corporate finance, I worked in external audit at a public accounting firm.

    Re: Graham – Jon Stewart impersonating him was a perfect encapsulation of the man.

    Like

  54. paul

    My name is Paul.

    Liked by 1 person

  55. Mine is a pen name due to my job having so many ethical and professional strings attached. JP is “just plain” and the other is my hometown. I used to post as “nosean morono” as part of that is my name and the rest is my general state of being when I get passionate about sports. No knock on Moreno.

    Like

  56. Athens Dog

    I moved back to Athens six years ago. couldn’t believe no one was using Athens Dog. There you go

    Read PJ O’Rourke’s Parliament of Whores………the republic is doomed 🙂

    Like

  57. doiknowu

    From Travis Bickle’s final meeting with Sport in “Taxi Driver”. It’s a way to reference my favorite ’70s film without being so obvious as “you talking to me?”.

    Like

  58. Dawglicious

    I was hungry.

    Like

  59. Anonymous

    Let’s try a conversation on how actually to solve the border issue.

    In my opinion, the #1 thing to do to solve our border security issue (among other problems) is to end the War on Drugs. Most of the problem is driven by the fact that the drug cartels control large portions of the governments in Mexico and in Central America. This corruption has led to huge amounts of violent crime and governmental dysfunction that had retarded economic opportunities in their countries. If drugs are legalized, the economic incentive is removed and the cartels will disappear as they are replaced by legal businesses. When the cartels are gone, hopefully their government will be forced to start working for the betterment of their people.

    I don’t think that building a wall on the border will do much to stop the problems on the Mexican side of the border. The wall may deter large amounts of economic migrants, but it will only raise the stakes for the drug cartels. I think you would just see more bribery / corruption within the border patrol and customs agents while the drugs still make it though.

    Like

    • Napoleon BonerFart

      The War on Drugs is certainly a major factor in the violence along the border and in Mexico generally. But there are certainly other factors at work. The Democrat party wants as much immigration as possible to add voters to their roles. The practice of granting citizenship to anchor babies incentivizes getting pregnant women across the border. And the welfare state in general is a huge incentive for immigrants.

      Removing incentives for immigration though ending the government programs and practices that currently encourage it would do more to reduce both legal and illegal immigration than a wall ever could.

      Like

      • The practice of granting citizenship to anchor babies…

        You mean the one embedded in the Constitution? Fucking Founding Fathers.

        Like

        • Anonymous

          The 14th Amendment wasn’t from the Founders. It was passed 1866 and was ratified in 1868. It is a bit murky as to whether so called “anchor babies” were supposed to be covered. They have been granted citizenship by tradition, but it hasn’t been ruled on by the courts. If it gets to the Supreme Court, I imagine they would rule to continue. Numbers wise, I think the “anchor baby” issue is more common with Chinese “tourists” than it is with economic migrants.

          Like

            • Napoleon BonerFart

              That didn’t apply to illegal immigrants. It didn’t even apply to Indians, who were here legally.

              Like

              • When you’re on the Supreme Court, you can make that point when you overrule the case.

                Like

                • Napoleon BonerFart

                  You believe that Congress needed to pass the Citizens Act of 1924 in order to grant rights to Indians that they already had? Curious.

                  I absolutely agree that Brennan’s view on the 14th amendment turned it exactly backward and became accepted practice. But like so many stupid notions from the court in the past, it was bullshit.

                  It’s sad that when faced with bullshit, your default position is to shrug and accept that if a dude in a robe declared it, our job as good little serfs is to shut up and accept it until some other dude in a robe tells us otherwise. But hey, different strokes.

                  Like

                • So now you’re the guy who believes Congress does everything logically?

                  Like

                • Napoleon BonerFart

                  Not exactly. But what was the purpose of the act? I very much doubt either party was courting the Indian vote in 1924. And I can’t think of other examples. Was there a 20th century law freeing the slaves? Or ending the practice of quartering troops in private homes?

                  And I also recognize that as illogical and ridiculous as Congress can be, the courts aren’t easily outdone.

                  Like

            • Anonymous

              The Wong decision ruled that he was a citizen because:
              1. His parents were legal residents with a permanent domicile and were operating a business here when he was born.
              2. His parents were not paid agents of a foreign government.
              3. He grew up here and deemed to be loyal to the US instead of China.

              The crux of the issue is that the Court has never defined “and subject to the jurisdiction thereof”. Wong said nothing of persons born here to parents that did not have residence, i.e. a tourist visa, or were here illegally. Granting those children citizenship has been tradition not something that has been ordered by the Court.

              Like

            • Derek

              Not that a reasonable answer is forthcoming given who is involved in the debate here, but I wonder what about the babies of so-called “anchor babies?” If they are excluded, aren’t we all at risk? If not, what’s the rational distinction between an “anchor baby” and an “anchor grand baby” or an “anchor great-grand baby?”

              Who among us could establish that ALL of our forefathers were legal? Most of mine were here before the US even existed, but not all.

              Should we re-apply the so-called “one drop rule” to this context to ensure only the purest of Americans are considered?

              Like

              • Napoleon BonerFart

                It’s not surprising Derek would come up with a stupid straw man argument. Either the borders must be completely open or we’re all going to be deported!11!11!! Medicare for Mexico!

                Like

              • Derek

                Not shocked that my point about a lack of rationality was established by an unrepentant moronic screwball.

                Like

                • Napoleon BonerFart

                  Give yourself a little credit, son. Worrying about deporting eighth generation Americans while complaining about a lack of rationality? Kudos.

                  Like

                • Derek

                  Some people are just fucking stupid and can’t actually come up with a rational rule that would address the so-called “anchor baby” yet save the “anchor grand baby” because they spend their time huffing gas and meme searching.

                  Like

                • Napoleon BonerFart

                  Like

                • Derek

                  There are a lot of dumbasses. Then someone tries to be the best at it.

                  Like

                • Napoleon BonerFart

                  You’ve got my vote, son. If nothing else, the righteous indignation you display while stringing together innumerable logical fallacies is hilarious.

                  Like

        • Napoleon BonerFart

          The Founding Fathers had nothing to do with the 14th amendment granting citizenship to former slaves. And even the amendment’s authors were concerned that it not grant citizenship to too many people.
          No, I’m talking about the right magically discovered through the emanations of penumbras in Brennan’s footnote in 1982. Unless you consider Brennan to be a Founding Father.

          Like

          • Sigh. I was being sarcastic about the Constitution, not birthright citizenship.

            Guess I need to tighten my snarkery.

            Like

            • Napoleon BonerFart

              My point still stands. The Founding Fathers weren’t in favor of judges inventing rights in footnotes. And it shouldn’t take a Constitutional amendment to undo Brennan’s overreach.

              Like

      • Anonymous

        Republican donors have always liked the fact that the illegal economic migrants drive down labor costs. The Democrats used to be the ones that primarily opposed illegal immigration, but that was before they abandoned working-class voters sometime between 2012 and 2016.

        The only government programs that illegals really use are the public schools for their kids and getting medical care in the emergency room. For some reason, people think they are living in public housing and are collecting food stamps. Instead, they are living 10 to a trailer and work 12+ hours a day.

        Like

        • Napoleon BonerFart

          You’re correct that Chamber of Commerce types want open borders. But illegals do use other government programs. Not at the rate of legal immigrants, except for food and Medicaid. But the costs aren’t insignificant.

          Like

          • spottieottie

            Undocumented immigrants (and DACA recipients) are ineligible for SNAP, TANF, SSI, and Medicaid.

            They are eligible for emergency Medicaid or WIC, but the notion that “cost” of undocumented immigrants using Medicaid is “significant” is a ridiculous one.

            Like

          • dubyadee

            Many illegals pay income and sales taxes, so are illegal immigrants net positive or negative to the treasury? I don’t know, but it seems like the kind of thing that would be reasonable to ask. But there is no political gain in answering factual questions that don’t support one side or the others talking points.

            Frankly, I have no idea if a wall (or even a partial wall) is a good idea. I could make a very argument that, if it was effective and not fiscally irresponsible, it is a more moral and humanitarian way to resolve a portion of our illegal immigration problem. Unfortunately, there is no one to trust on making the factual analysis. All you hear is “Durr, big beautiful wall!” and “That’s racist!”

            Of course, that is by design. As Bluto notes, it is not about the wall, it is about political power. Anybody who is actual interested in good policy is just a potentially useful idiot to politicians.

            Like

            • Derek

              If we had a rational government we’d have a policy of controlled entry that:

              took photos
              took fingerprints
              ran a criminal background ck

              asked for a destination
              provided some photo identification indicating that the person passed through a legal port of entry and was cleared

              required periodic reporting with pay stub AND recheck criminal background.

              Person stays employed and out of trouble for an agreed amount of time and they can apply for citizenship

              The problem is that some people want less Mexicans period.

              And they will say so. Its an attack on our culture or our language or whatever nonsense that gets spewed.

              Bottom line is that one party has decided there are more votes in animating angry white racists than appeal to American generally.

              Like

              • Anonymous

                If we had a rational government we’d have a policy of controlled entry that:

                took photos
                took fingerprints
                ran a criminal background ck

                asked for a destination
                provided some photo identification indicating that the person passed through a legal port of entry and was cleared

                required periodic reporting with pay stub AND recheck criminal background.

                Person stays employed and out of trouble for an agreed amount of time and they can apply for citizenship

                The problem is that some people want less Whites period.

                And they will say so. Its perpetuating white neo-colonialism whatever nonsense that gets spewed.

                Bottom line is that one party has decided there are more votes in yelling “angry white racists” than appeal to American generally.

                The thing is, the vast majority of people, despite their other political leanings, support an immigration system exactly as you spelled out. The issue is that, as you point out, we do not have a rational government. When the government fails to give us that immigration system, it results in a schism. Those on the left think it is because those on the right are white nationalists that hate Mexicans. Those on the right think it is because globalists are trying to enact the NWO.

                This gets back to my posts above about ascribing intentions to people.

                Like

                • Derek

                  Maybe but only one of those conclusions has any basis in fact.

                  Like

                • Anonymous

                  I would expect the exact same response from a Trump supporter that is worried about globalist shills. Funny how that works.

                  Like

                • Derek

                  Ok, but where is the evidence of it?

                  I can give you quotes from Trump to Ann Coulter to Pat Buchanan and on and on.

                  Where’s the advocation from a prominent person for a “1 world gubmit?”

                  Like

                • Anonymous

                  Here is a list of NWO quotes from politicians that some whack-job conspiracist put together. I looked of the list and can verify that at least some of them are well known verified quotes.

                  https://endtimesprophecyreport.com/2013/06/05/new-world-order-37-quotes-on-the-new-world-order/

                  The issue is that just like with your Trump quotes where the “racism” will be “dog whistling”, it is the same here. The “true support” is shown in the “dog whistles” about the NWO.

                  For example show me a truly racist quote that isn’t “dog whistling” from Donald Trump that I can verify is true. Keep in mind that “illegal immigrant” and “muslim” are not races. Also keep in mind that stereotyping and general bigotry are not racism.

                  I’ve seen more “racist” quotes from Joe Biden than I have from Trump. If you continue to insist that racist quotes are all from Republicans, I’ll start posting LBJ quotes.

                  Like

                • Derek

                  NWO and one world government aren’t exactly the same ya know.

                  Like

                • Anonymous

                  Yes, but the people that are worried about globalist conspiracies sure do think it is a dog whistle for some one world commie government, which was my point.

                  It is the same as where people try to make the claim that Republican voters are not actually concerned about violent crime committed by members of the drug cartels. It is just dog-whistling to racist whites by Trump to let them know that he hates non-whites too. Y’all essentially propose the idea that white Republicans would be fine if their daughter was raped and murdered so long as the murderer was white.

                  I find both suppositions to be false.

                  Like

                • Napoleon BonerFart

                  Like

              • dubyadee

                There are an incredible number of people within hitchhiking distance of the US border for whom being destitute and illegal in the US is a far better option than being destitute and legal in their place of origin. And the surge of cheap, legal labor would have a destabilizing effect. We could argue about the danger of that effect, but my main concern is that, if the market wage for unskilled labor drops below what we reasonably consider a living wage, then (a) poverty (which is relatively low in the US) will increase and (b) wealth/income inequality (which is already high in the US) will increase even more. Put those in a pot, stir it up with a little class warfare by the left and race baiting by the right, and you have a revolution.

                But I agree that concerns about language and culture are overblown. They are also worn out from use against Catholics back in the day.

                So, I am strongly in favor of a system that limits entry, though I think the country should tie the number allowed legal entry to labor market numbers. I strongly suspect the country could reasonably support much higher legal immigration numbers than we currently do.

                I also think the US has a vested interest in the health, safety and prosperity of people in Latin America, and should be doing/spending more to help solve the problems in places like Nicaragua.

                That’s what seems rational to me.

                Like

      • Melania Trump is an anchor baby (“married” to a large bloated orange man-baby).

        Like

    • dawgtor

      I don’t think that we can decriminalize drugs, but I think we can greatly reduce the level of punishment for them. Anti-drug campaigns and places to safely use that are coupled with free counseling services would be much more cost effective. I agree with the idea that the crises in central america are largely a byproduct of our country’s appetite for drugs and highly punitive system. Also, everify for employment to undercut the demand for illegal immigrants. That being said, we will need to either give amnesty to or provide citizenship to a whole lot of people due to our need for their labor. Everify will cause a major shift in the economy and we will have to be prepared to further subsidize agriculture. I guess that would be ok since we already did it over Trump’s uninformed trade squabbles and the insane costs of drug enforement, the legal system and incarceration. We put less money toward fixing the opiod crisis than Trump is asking for the first stage of his wall…
      https://www.ama-assn.org/delivering-care/opioids/billions-approved-fight-end-opioid-epidemic
      I will agree with anything and am willing to be wrong and change my stance if I am provided with good evidence.
      My handle is bc I’m a doctor, went to UGA for undergrad, and I like the whole -tor masculine latin roots.

      Like

  60. dubyadee

    I have always tolerated Lindsey Graham with the knowledge that his eventual replacement will be a nutcase teabagger (rather than a cretin), and would probably more effective in Washington (where Graham stopped being taken seriously years ago). I am sure most of you think SC voters couldn’t do worse, but you don’t live here. We could do much worse.

    Like

  61. Dawg Vegas

    Dawg Vegas combines two of my favorite things. Got married at Caesar’s Palace, started at UGA in fall of ’84 (not in that order), stayed in Athens for a few years after graduation and would love to retire there.

    Graham (and many others) = clown

    Like

  62. Spur 21

    “Spur 21” was my Air Cav call sign in VN. Second time around I was “Red Carpet 3”

    Like

  63. Mallard-Drake

    I duck hunt. Simple as that.

    Like

  64. MDDawg

    I was living in Maryland when I found the blog, so…MDDawg.

    Like

  65. sniffer

    Mine comes from GA-FL around 2002. A few cocktails in, I was captured by the scent of a coed who walked by. I followed for a few steps and leaned in to catch her scent again. She stops, unaware I’m there, and I find my nose deep in her hair and neck. My buddies, who had seen the thing, roared with approval and hence, the name was born. BTW, the girl was startled but not put off and her general approval were duly noted. So, there.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Gurkha Dawg

      Classic college story. Sounds like something that would happen to me back in the day. Nice that the chick was cool. I’ve seen such shenanigans not turn out so well.

      Like

  66. Anonymous

    I use the name Anonymous as it is to avoid giving out personal info. Fun fact: There are other people on here that use the same name. Only about 75% of the comments on site from “Anonymous” are actually from me. I don’t know if it is a regular poster that LARPs as me or if it is just random people that stop by to leave a message and choose the name for the same reason.

    Like

  67. Bulldog Joe

    I accepted the invitation from Coach Richt in 2010.

    Like

  68. Raleighwood Dawg

    My username is based on the city I’ve (mostly) lived in since 1990. Raleigh folks like to say “Raleighwood”. I’m originally from Americus, GA.

    Like

  69. Pantslesspaydye

    Pantsesspatdye-I got my Xbox live account the same week as the Alabama drought exposed coach dyes wallet. Spencer hall wrote a terrific post on it and I was in a pinch for a name.

    Like