Your 1.13.21 Playpen

After what’s been a disturbing week of news for anyone who cares about this country, I (and a couple of readers who sent me suggestions via email) could use a little positivity, and this op-ed from , who in 1961, along with Hamilton Holmes, were the first African-Americans to attend the University of Georgia is something of a salve in that regard.  It’s a good reminder that, while there are significant bumps along the way, we Americans do eventually grow and strive to make things better.

The trick is not to become so discouraged we give up on that.

We have many challenges ahead. There are times when, watching the news, I am brought to tears, not least when I see some of those I still think of as my fellow citizens, nevertheless exhibit awful behavior toward others who don’t look like them — the latest in the despicable behavior at the Capitol.

It is in these moments that I wonder: Why have they not learned from history? Is it because not all of our history is being taught in many schools around the country? And why is there no embrace of respecting differences of opinion?

As we make sense of these questions, history will continue to echo itself. As Georgia elected its first Black senator, Raphael Warnock, I thought back to Henry McNeal Turner, my high school’s namesake, and other Black officials freely elected to office during the brief period of Reconstruction over 150 years ago.

And so as I reflect on the 60th anniversary of my university’s desegregation — as a Black person and a woman, as a wife and mother, as a sister, aunt and citizen — remaining true to my calling as a journalist, I leave you with the question: What can we all do to keep working toward a more perfect union? Go Dogs!

Have at it in the comments.

298 Comments

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298 responses to “Your 1.13.21 Playpen

  1. Ms. Hunter-Gault and Mr. Holmes = DGDs

    Liked by 14 people

  2. biggusrickus

    Yeah, the riots over the summer were no biggie, nor the rampant election fraud, but a riot at “the people’s house”, that’s truly disturbing.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Mean Machine

      I never realized how close the words obvious and oblivious were until JUST now.

      Liked by 8 people

    • Serious question: if there really was serious election fraud, how come none of the US attorneys Trump has appointed, nor William Barr, have charged anyone?

      Liked by 6 people

      • biggusrickus

        Because to do so would basically destroy their standing. But you don’t believe that, and I won’t convince you of it. I’m not looking for a debate here, just venting a little. This country has serious problems, and it seems to me that the political differences are irreconcilable in the long term. I expect it will get worse.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Derek

          You want to see a problem?

          Find the nearest mirror.

          Liked by 5 people

          • gurkhadawg

            That reminds me of when my wife asked me why I drink so much. I replied: look in the mirror.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Idlewild Dawg

            & of course this only applies to those who have opinions that are different from yours

            Like

          • You could say the same for yourself . The problem now is that we have no tolerance for other ideas , and we think our side is always right and the other side are idiots. But your virtue signal has been received and your wokeness knows no bounds sir.

            Like

            • Idlewild Dawg

              …we have no tolerance for other ideas… that’s my whole point, sport.

              Like

            • Derek

              You want a respectful debate?

              Start with facts and I guarantee you’ll get one from me.

              There are people on the right that I disagree with and respect.

              Then there are people I disagree with who also happen to be stupid.

              I mock those people.

              And I won’t respect an opinion that some conspiracy deprived trump of a second term. The american voter deprived him of a second term. And we deserve to have the government we voted for despite some morons childish butthurt.

              If their fee fees is hurted and I make it worse then good.

              Liked by 1 person

              • Bulldawg Bill

                …and you don’t wax floors, you don’t do window’s, you don’t iron, you don’t cook………

                Like

              • Odontodawg

                And I think this is essentially the problem. If you decide who is “stupid” and use that subjective opinion as justification to “mock” them, then we can never have respectful debate in our country. It’s just not possible.

                Like

                • Derek

                  So there is no fact and no truth?

                  If you deny objective FACT and TRUTH you are objectively stupid. It has nothing to do with subjectivity.

                  The existence of gravity is not a debate subject. I’m not honoring a flat earthers opinion. You’re not entitled to be coddled in your ignorance.

                  Once we can agree on a shared reality based in truth and fact only then can we have a respectful debate.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • Your bug is their feature. Debate isn’t the goal. The goal is submission. “Chromosomes are a social construct,” isn’t debatable. It isn’t meant to be. So it will be repeated over and over and those who argue against it will be censored, ostricized, and fired. Children will be taught this as a matter of faith. And a controversial view becomes dogma.

                  Like

                • Derek

                  In addition to creating facts where there are none they also create threats where there are none.

                  However, any internal or external threat or activity that patriotic Americans would fear such as:

                  Hostile military intelligence activity
                  Domestic terrorism by rw nuts
                  Even civil war past or present

                  will be minimized as folly. You really have to admire that level of commitment to stupid.

                  Over 70% of domestic terror in the US has been from the right.

                  Everybody who has looked at it say we were attacked by russia.

                  Some minimize both FACTS and instead cower in fear if the threat presented by smelly hippies in sandals walking the streets of Berkeley. You know why? They’re fucking stupid.

                  And traitors.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • Odontodawg

                  Thank you for proving my point about the prospect of respectful debate when the opening rhetoric is “stupid,” “treason,” and “traitors.” Exactly.

                  Like

                • We on the left also change history. 30 deaths in riots over the summer? Peaceful protests. A leftist shooting up a Congressional baseball game? It either didn’t happen, or it must have been a right winger. And the continual adherence to the Russia hoax and treason, despite all evidence to the contrary.

                  Like

                • Derek

                  They’ll keep proving how stupid and treasonous they are.

                  Over and over….

                  Respectful debate with these people?

                  Why? They undermine our institutions, invite foreign hostile actors to do the same and then blame the patriots for revealing the facts about their treason and stupidity.

                  Not worth talking to. Just mock the mockery that they are.

                  Like

                • Leftists insist that anyone who claims the emperor has no clothes is a traitor.

                  Like

              • Odontodawg

                The essence of debate is looking at facts and making an argument as to how those facts should be interpreted. One person makes a point, the other makes a counterpoint. You go from there. You don’t shut it down and call your opponent stupid because you disagree with their interpretation of the facts. If you do so, then you can never engage in debate (let alone respectful debate). But your idea of debate may be different than mine or others. I won’t call you stupid for that.

                Like

        • I don’t understand what “destroy their standing” means. Barr had no problem sending Durham on what looks like a wild goose chase regarding Russia. He’s done things Trump wanted more than once.

          In Atlanta, Pak was forced to resign under pressure from the WH because he wasn’t moving fast enough to find and charge voter fraud. You’re not going to tell me there aren’t some USAs who are motivated to support the POTUS’ wishes.

          Bottom line, if there really was fraud, people would have already been charged and put front and center in front of the TV to support Trump’s claims.

          Liked by 13 people

          • Bulldawg Bill

            Problem is with the D.C. political establishment types, Republican and Democrat alike. They are mainly interested in having a political life in D.C. Trump is clearly a threat to that both as the POTUS or as a civilian. That explains the continued assault with him on the way out the door.

            Liked by 2 people

            • Interesting choice of words there in your last sentence.

              Liked by 1 person

            • mddawg

              Bulldawg Bill, are you saying that Cruz, Graham, etc. are only going along with Trump’s election fraud claims so they can stay in his supporters’ good graces and continue their careers in D.C.? If so, I agree, I just wanted to make sure I understood your meaning. If I’ve misunderstood, please let me know.

              Like

              • Bulldawg Bill

                Cruz yes, Graham no. Graham is one of the mushy middle types that likes grandstanding on principle without having to act on much. McConnell is the most egregious example.

                Liked by 1 person

                • Tony BarnFart

                  As a 2 time Trump voter, I’m utterly exhausted by Donald Trump. His behavior over the last 2 months has me yearning for “mushy middle types.” There’s a lot of people who voted for Biden who would push the button for a mushy middle type. That can lower the insanity on the left because they needed that suburban moderate coalition to win election….. hard left is a tougher sell when the opponent is not seen as a psychopath by so many.

                  Liked by 2 people

      • Taylor Masters

        Why even try at this point with comments like this? It’s all a never ending rabbit hole, sad really.

        Like

    • Derek

      Why wouldn’t anyone give Ms. Lindsey just one example? Just 1?

      At 2:25. https://youtu.be/h1ppZBZYmjI

      Rampant, huh? You sure?

      Like

    • Ray S

      It was mostly peaceful, though!

      Like

    • Spell Dawg

      Some men, you just can’t reach…

      Liked by 2 people

  3. gurkhadawg

    Had the second dose of the Trump vaccine yesterday. Thank you President Trump for saving humanity from extinction.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. I consider myself a moderate politically and can say that I have serious issues with the loonies on both left and right. If you are riding shotgun with either, you may want to check yourself. Anyway, term limits would be a big help towards healing the country in more ways than one.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Taylor Masters

      Oh boy, a both sides argument after an actual coup attempt.

      Liked by 7 people

      • Hey storming the Capital Bldg and beating an officer to death is totally equivalent to looting a Target or blocking traffic for a few hours.

        Liked by 8 people

        • beatarmy92

          Riots are not okay. They aren’t equal per se in the Spectrum of Wrong, but they are both wrong. All good citizens should be willing to acknowledge that. The Dems and media who downplayed or dismissed the riots, property destruction (mostly minority neighborhoods and businesses) were wrong to do so. And Pubs who downplayed or encouraged the actions on 1/6 were wrong.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Derek

            So reacting to a video of a police officer murdering someone is similar to reacting to a sack full of lies?

            I don’t recall anyone associated with the Floyd rallies suggesting that our country’s institutions be overthrown as illegitimate.

            I think they just wanted to stop seeing police murder unarmed citizens on video.

            Liked by 1 person

            • beatarmy92

              Normalizing what happened over the summer and justifying it is wrong.

              Liked by 3 people

              • Derek

                Normalizing what happened to George Floyd and justifying it is wrong.

                That happened. We all saw it. Similar actioms should be deterred by any means necessary.

                Reacting to a pack of lies is an entirely different thing.

                If for example there was ACTUAL evidence that trump won I would say a reaction would be justified.

                But its always been horse shit and anyone with a brain should no that. Dumb is not a defense.

                Liked by 1 person

                • beatarmy92

                  “ Normalizing what happened to George Floyd and justifying it is wrong.”

                  No one here did that though. Rioting isn’t the only possible response to Floyd’s death, and justifying the riots is still wrong.

                  Like

                • Derek

                  Tell it to Sam Adams.

                  Like

                • beatarmy92

                  Sam Adams was a reviolutionary trying to overthrow the existing order and make a new one. Is that what you want BLM/Antifa to do? I’m not sure why elkse you’d make the comparison.

                  Like

                • Derek

                  I have no problem with people willing to kill and die for a good and honorable cause, full stop.

                  The idea that our Founders chose to kill and die for was self-government and egalitarianism. The fits and stops and starts that have marked are country’s history has routinely been based upon who deserves to participate in that government and who does not.

                  As long as the rights of the minority are protected and democratic will is respected there is no need to revolt.

                  When minorities are exposed to unjustified state-sponsored violence and/or the will of the majority is cast aside, those are the appropriate times to seek remedies other than the vote.

                  The recent insurrection was not one of those times.

                  Liked by 1 person

            • Tony BarnFart

              “I don’t recall anyone associated with the Floyd rallies suggesting that our country’s institutions be overthrown as illegitimate.”

              WTH do you call the massive, summer long “Defund the Police” movement and the burning and occupation of a couple / several in different cities ? And sacks full of lies ? Continuously telling the public that cops are systematically out there murdering black people. That is demonstrably false, and if you truly are a man of “facts” as you allege, you would not lie to yourself about that.

              Like

              • Derek

                It was on video.

                Like

                • Tony BarnFart

                  Derek, part of our national healing will have to come from both sides. You and I both know that what happened to George Floyd was horrific. We also both know that events like this have been used to paint a broad brush about the police in general that, like election fraud, are simply not backed up in evidence.

                  Like

                • Derek

                  Of course I don’t think all police are itching to kill people.

                  I do think that choking someone to death on video in front of witnesses, while fellow officers watch and do nothing, suggests a institutionalized attitude about the appropriate use of force that must be addressed.

                  In short, if a police on his day off shoots and kills someone, well people commit murder. It happens. Not a public concern beyond those affected.

                  When you do it in uniform and its obvious and apparent that while your doing you either feel:

                  justified and/or
                  You will get away with it

                  There is a systemic problem.

                  I would suggest to you that if you saw a person you love under that knee begging for his/her life that you’d be less than circumspect. Not suggesting that emotional responses are the best responses, they ain’t, but the people who acted out knew that could be them or someone they care about. You should be able to at least understand their concern even if you can’t endorse the resulting tactics, rhetoric or proposed solutions.

                  Liked by 1 person

              • debbybalcer

                Defund the police does not mean what you think it means. It was a poorly worded phrase. It meant to stop militarizing our police forces and move money to other means of law enforcement. Good policing is important. Bad policing needs to end.

                Liked by 3 people

          • gurkhadawg

            I condemn both the BLM/ antifa riots and the MAGAs riot. However the victims of one were mainly small business owners. Many were minority small business owners. The victims of the other were mainly rich, white politicians. It’s more than a little ironic that the left cares more about the rich , white politicians.

            Liked by 2 people

        • ugafidelis

          David Dorn would likely disagree with this hot take.

          Like

      • Ah, riding shotgun with the left I see. Check yourself. Not only did the loonies on the left set fire to cities over the summer, and lay siege to government buildings, but the their politicians and media managed to encourage it while it was happening.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Butler Reynolds

        Think about what would have to happen to pull of a coup then open up your dictionary and find another word. It was disgraceful, despicable, pathetic, stupid, awful, and unjustifiable in every possible way, but a coup it was not.

        If Trump intended for this to be a coup, then he’s even dumber than I’ve already thought him to be for the past 5 years.

        Like

    • Derek

      Politicians with less experience! Less choices for voters!!

      Nothing embraces the aspirations of a government for, of and by the people more than concluding that we can’t actually have one.

      Like

  5. dawg100

    “It’s a good reminder that, while there are significant bumps along the way, we Americans do eventually grow and strive to make things better. The trick is not to become so discouraged we give up on that.”

    “Let us not become weary in doing good, for at the proper time we will reap a harvest if we do not give up.” Galatians 6:9

    Liked by 2 people

    • RangerRuss

      I never get weary of gator bashing. The “Seven” Seinfeld clip reminded me of what an insufferable asshole my gaytard buddy Robert can be.
      Other buddy, Mark, failed to put Duke’s on my sandwich.
      “You want mayonnaise? NO SAMMICH FOR YOU!” Everyone laughed except ol Bob. Why did he not laugh? He didn’t get the reference to the Soup Nazi as he claims to have never watched an episode of Seinfeld or any sitcom. Well ain’t he superior.
      “Probably got you a little Superior Dance, don’t you RRRRRRobert.”
      He didn’t get that either.
      FTMF.

      Liked by 1 person

      • gurkhadawg

        There is nothing more fun than sitting around with a bunch of good buddies thinking of new ways to give each other shit.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Got Cowdog

          So you’ve never gotten laid …

          Liked by 1 person

          • gurkhadawg

            Damn it, I forgot about that one. I don’t know about you, but when I was single, getting laid was far from guaranteed. My buddies were always there for some good beer drinking and bullshitting. Then I got married and assumed that meant UNLIMITED SEX! My wife doesn’t always see things the way I do.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Got Cowdog

              Sorry buddy, I couldn’t help it. 🙂

              Liked by 2 people

              • RangerRuss

                Lot of shit talk the first night at our restaurant meeting spot in Boca. I shut it down most rikki tik the last three years. My turn to eat a bit, but I won’t take much. I don’t have to wear jump boots to do my thing.

                Like

  6. sundiatagaines

    America will always do the right thing after exhausting all other possibilities.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Spell Dawg

      Great quote attributed to Winston Churchill, I’ve said it at least half a dozen times in these last few months.

      You can always count on the Americans to do the right thing, after they have exhausted all the other possibilities.

      Like

  7. Godawg

    Half the problem is a lack of education in the general population. Nobody teaches Civics anymore in high school so people don’t know how our government works. Hell, most don’t even know what type of government we have and how it differs from others, such as a true democracy or socialist government. We also don’t teach much History anymore so, yes, we are doomed to repeat it.

    Liked by 7 people

    • Derek

      It started with the people who decided that ketchup was a vegetable and that the fairness doctrine was unnecessary.

      Millions in profit + millions dumb people = avalanche of insanity

      It was perfectly predictable. You have people who are gaining power, money and prestige fear mongering and manipulating idiots. At first the idiots are just a fraction that help you and your country club friends win some elections. Then they gain power from within. Then they take over the party and nominate a narcissistic criminal for president.

      Meanwhile, I’ve been out here issuing warning after warning that what we’re seeing is treason in plain sight by a wannabe dictator and it takes an insurrection for people to wake the fuck up.

      It appears that Mein Fürhgrabber finally overplayed his hand.

      Go away MAGAts. Its over. You’re done.

      Liked by 2 people

      • beatarmy92

        Today’s politics just feels like a massive Robber Cave Experiment. It’s all Us v. Them and picking tribes. Eagles v. Rattlers.

        Today party affiliation is just tribal mostly. Both parties, the actual party orgs, are corrupted. Neither confers vice nor virtue to the member. For that matter neither seems very interested in furthering the ideals expressed in the Declaration.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Derek

          This bothsiderism is just sad.

          There is zero comparison between elected republicans and elected democrats when it comes to responsible leadership.

          Saying that a 22 year old antifa member acts like the president so you know same and stuff is just painful.

          You can’t find any president of any party acting like this fuckhead. He is an aberration. The sooner we embrace that the sooner we can move past it.

          Liked by 2 people

          • beatarmy92

            I don’t disagree with any of that except the dismissive comment about “bothsideserism.” First, believing there are “sides” is likening this to war and encourages the desire to vanquish your enemies. That’s exactly the psychology of the Robbers Cave Experiment. And yes, people in both parties do this just as the kids did.

            It seems we are in a place where a victory by one “side” now is automatically viewed as illegitimate by the other. And the prevailing message is that if “my side” doesn’t win then to hell with America. My priority and my focus is rather on America and the ideals expressed in the Declaration. To that end I refuse to join a side.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Democratic candidates spending years arguing that they were robbed by Russians is totally different than a different candidate arguing that he was robbed for a month. A candidate fear mongering that blacks will be put in chains is fine. When we do it it’s good. When they do it it’s bad. It’s really not difficult.

            Like

          • Don in Mar-a-Lago

            Like

    • We’re just lucky that Trump is a terrible communicator.

      Like

    • They must not have taught Civics in Tommy Tuberville’s high school, either.

      Liked by 4 people

      • HirsuteDawg

        Ignorance is part of the problem. The other part of the problem are the folks that know better and throw out falsehoods to confuse the gullible / ignorant. The kind of people that can spout more shit in 10 minutes than you could think of in a week.

        Liked by 4 people

  8. beatarmy92

    Nothing about Tyrique being in the portal and probably heading to Miami? Kirby is going to need a DB from the portal or a JC one to sing in Feb.

    Like

  9. Bay Area Dawg

    All Congressman, Senators, Pres Trump and especially the media need to look in the mirror. They all have directly caused the divide in the country. Over the past four years the Democrats tried everything to get Pres Trump out of office and delegitimize his presidency. He won they might not have liked it but he won. I can’t even imagine the amount of money and time that was wasted on trying to get him out of office.

    People keep saying the the riots over the summer and the incident at the Capitol are not related, I strongly disagree. The American public are like children if you let one get away with one thing do you not think the other one is going to do the same exact thing if not worse. State and local governments should have dropped the hammer as soon as the protests turned violent but the media and local/state leaders wouldn’t allow it. The media coverage of the two incidents couldn’t have been any farther from equal. CNN has turned into a giant joke as they don’t even try to hide their biases.

    There was not widespread election fraud in the past election. The Republicans should have backed the election results and shutdown the fraud narrative immediately. Should people be allowed to use mail in ballots if they are not overseas or cannot realistically make it to the poll? The answer is NO! Make the day of the election a national holiday and give everyone the day off to make sure they can make it to the polls, but mail in ballots are not the answer.

    I don’t know what to do fix our issues but I know it has to start at the top. Pres Trump did a terrible job trying to bring the country together and Biden has started out just as bad. I strongly believe “Term Limits” is the best approach but it will never happen because the most powerful people in Congress would have to vote to give up their power……Pelosi and McConnell.

    Lastly, the power of Big Tech needs to be reigned in immediately. I totally understand they are private corps and can bar or censor who they want, but they are also protected by Section 230. If they want to choose who they want to censor or limit access to then they need to have Section 230 revoked and be held accountable for what is posted on their sites.

    These are just my thoughts.

    Go Dawgs!

    Liked by 7 people

    • All of this makes too much sense, BA Dawg!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Trump’s never been interested in trying to bring the country together. See his October 2019 tweet declaring “Never Trumper Republicans” are “human scum.”

      Liked by 5 people

    • I get the feeling, like many people, you don’t actually understand what Section 230 covers and doesn’t cover.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Bay Area Dawg

        I would love to learn. Can you explain it to me?

        Like

          • Bay Area Dawg

            Instead of just providing a link wikipedia, why don’t you explain to me why I am wrong and how I can better understand the legality of Section 230?

            I have no problem being wrong or listening to other opinions.

            Like

            • W Cobb Dawg

              I believe you are correct with most of your sentence on 230. Most of all, revoking 230 it would require internet firms to monitor the content on the sites to remove false information, or be subject to the same accountability of other outlets, such as newspapers.

              I would disagree with the word “censor” in your sentence. It’s not censorship to police the postings in newpapers (and hopefully the internet after 230 is revoked) to remove or retract items which subject the publisher to legal liability.

              Like

    • HirsuteDawg

      I think you are wrong about absentee ballots. Just because we hand to line up with a pencil in 1800 does not mean we have to do it that way in 2021. What is does do is get more people to vote – and we should encourage that – not suppress the vote with layer upon layer of identification checks – which is just another technique for voter suppression.

      Liked by 5 people

      • mp

        Complaining about absentee ballots the middle of a pandemic to boot, give me a break

        Liked by 2 people

        • Morris Day

          Here’s what I’d like to see happen with absentee and mail-in ballots. Deadline to turn them in is the Friday before the election on Tuesday. They are all counted that weekend and secured under lock and key, not to be touched, unless a recount is triggered. I feel that would remove a lot of the distrust some people have with the way they are counted. The totals for absentee/mail-in can be revealed immediately after the polls close in that state. The remaining votes from in-person voting on Election Day would then be added to the tallies as they are counted.

          Liked by 1 person

          • mp

            Good point. It is amazing that republican legislators in swing states did not allow mail in votes to be counted ahead of time. The shape of the vote reporting was known in advance but still pointed to by supporters of the president to declare fraud.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Russ

              Yet another point conveniently ignored by the “election fraud” crowd. It was the Republicans who pushed to block early counting of the mail in votes. So of course the count was going to continue past the closing of the polls. It was guaranteed to happen.

              Liked by 3 people

      • Tony BarnFart

        You have to have a middle ground. Election security and trust has to come BEFORE the election. Many calm, educated people can look afterwards or look at historical records and draw conclusions that things are pretty above-board….but that’s not the general public. The “you have no proof” or “absence of fraud” standard doesn’t get us where we need to be, particularly if it comes in the form of condescending shaming. You can be “right” every time but do you want to be “right” or do you want to have shitshows like we’ve had for the past 2 months culminating last week ?

        Dismissing concerns about making the public feel secure in elections (meaning going forward, not relitigating this one), IMO, is akin to the old “black folks just need to pull themselves up by their bootstraps” take on race in america. Ok, great. How’s that shaming worked out ? Badly ? Perhaps because the issue is more fundamental than can be solved by evidentiary hearings and lack of evidence.

        Liked by 1 person

        • ASEF

          There is no proof of fraud.

          There is simultaneously a mountain of evidence that elections were fair. Rigorous chain of custodies and audits. Video records. Bipartisan watchers everywhere.

          I’m a poll worker volunteer. I see the process directly.

          The fact people refuse to look at that evidence is not something I should have to fix. That evidence is presented to them. They refuse to see it.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Right. Unlike those dummies who cling to the the narrative of no proof of Russian collusion meaning something. It means something when we like it.

            Like

          • Tony BarnFart

            You are one MF’ing poll worker in one state in a nation of 50 states with 50 different sets of rules. You can’t preach about a process in another state any more than I can.

            “Not something I have to fix”….give me a break. What a shallow comment. In a free country you should WANT it to be unquestioned and embraced. Yes, the public has a big effing problem with mail-in voting because you have a chain of custody problem that, if used widespread enough, is literally impossible for the “public to look at the evidence.” So instead of maybe taking a hard look at that going forward, you’ll double down on ridicule. Hell of a plan. That should keep lunatics out of the capitol going forward–maybe you could walk out on the steps and tell them how stupid they are and just need to look at the evidence. While you’re at it, could you mention to any african-americans in the crowd that policing isn’t a problem and if they’re too stupid to look at the evidence, there is no help for them. That will work out well too.

            Trust in government systems, particularly something as bedrock in a democracy as the vote (helllooooo!) is something you (we all) have to maintain and/or fix. And if I’m being honest, the same folks who scream at me about how hard it is to get an ID to vote (the biggest lie in the world, told enough that they believe it) doesn’t exactly warm my cockles when they act like there are zero chain-of-custody issues in the mail-in vote.

            Like

            • Yes, the public has a big effing problem with mail-in voting…

              That would explain its popularity.

              Like

              • Tony BarnFart

                So Bill Barr is just fooling himself and everyone in that interview last summer ? The Attorney General of the United States ? Call him a Trump lackey all you want (predictable but untrue) but he’s done more in his legal career than any of the lawyers on this blog, myself included. But totally untrustworthy because something something rabid partisan politics.

                Like

                • Bill Barr isn’t a Trump lackey. He’s a Republican lackey.

                  There are states that have been using voting by mail for years and years without a problem.

                  Don’t know where you reside, but in Georgia, the Secretary of State had conducted multiple recounts all backing up the initial data. Moreover, in the runoff, the Republican Party was urging its voters to use vote by mail.

                  The “public” you refer to are those with a vested interest in voter suppression. Of course, they usually refer to that as voter fraud.

                  Like

                • You’re not providing evidence or making an argument. You’re just defending the status quo. Mail in voting is susceptible to fraud. Period. It has been used fraudulently. That is a fact. Nobody should dispute this.

                  What leftists hang their hat on is there is no proof of widespread fraud that could have swung this election. And that’s true. But it’s a far cry from proof of secure elections.

                  LBJ won a senate election by producing 202 votes 6 days after the election, which were all for him. Decades later, we still have a system where boxes full of ballots are discovered/delivered long after most of the counting is done. Maybe that makes you feel warm and fuzzy. But as Tony pointed out, it’s hardly helpful to insist that people who don’t feel reassured by a system like that are just nutjobs.

                  Like

                • Again, the people who don’t feel reassured aren’t really worried about fraud. They’re worried about the colored folks voting.

                  Widespread voter fraud isn’t a myth. It’s a tool for voter suppression.

                  Oh, and if it’s evidence you want, go ask Kris Kobach.

                  Like

                • Derek

                  Senator,

                  Are you saying that having a WH who puts together a voter fraud commission that then disbands without issuing a report is evidence that there is no widespread voter fraud problem, else those motivated to share evidence of voter fraud, would have?

                  Seems a bit too fact based. Too grounded in rationality. You know, for those “concerned” underminers of our nation’s institutions.

                  How about this: “Russia, if you’re listening, find and release evidence of American voter fraud, I’m sure you’ll be richly rewarded?”

                  I think inviting Putin and GRU to handle it would hit their treasonous erogenous zones and give them the satisfaction they are looking for.

                  What is really sad is that the people who insist that we must recognize there are single digit numbers of voter fraud in every election don’t then explain that those isolated incidents are:

                  1) not enough to have influenced one state’s outcome
                  2) not enough to change the results to favor trump
                  3) not even enough to rusk depriving any Americans of an opportunity to participate in elections.

                  Had they done so 5 Americans would now be alive.

                  But I get the distinct feeling they don’t give a rats ass about the blood on their hands.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • That’s a lot of words to say, “REEEEEEE!!11!1”

                  Like

                • Derek

                  The good news is that he was not a glass window. That window cost some money replace.

                  Too bad Manson isn’t alive to say “whataboutism!” He wasn’t there when the killing happened either. He just instigated it. Like trump did.

                  Like

                • Wait, so police are important now? Curious.

                  Like

              • Tony BarnFart

                I’m worried about voter fraud and integrity. I’m also not trying to supress anybody’s vote. Why wouldn’t I be worried–we have people politically charged up enough to do all the crazy things we’ve seen the last 4 years, meanwhile, we devote increasingly countless dollars in the defense budget to cyber security and people and institutions in all walks of life get hacked and duped etc etc every single day.

                You think people politically charged up enough to physically take over a downtown core for a couple of months would hesitate to cheat in voting ? Fraud slips through the cracks like water through a rock. Yes, I use online banking because I need it multiple times per week. The risk is worth if for the convenience. On the other hand, asking somebody to get an ID (i guess none of these people ever buy alcohol or do anything else requiring ID) and get off their ass every 2 years for what society used to call a civic duty is just repression by God ! Give me a break. How do you look in the mirror and lie to yourself like that ?

                Like

                • You actually think that black people have drivers licenses, social security cards, and birth certificates? Wow. Just wow. I literally can’t even. Racist much?

                  You need to spend more time in elite liberal Jewish echo chambers. You’ll understand that, even in 2021, most black people are sharecroppers or slaves who can’t read, have no documents (or means to acquire any), and need white leftists to stand up for them.

                  Like

                • … elite liberal Jewish echo chambers…

                  WTF? Are you looking for me to ban your trolling ass from here?

                  Like

  10. ASEF

    The Big Lies of Trump World have a significant chucks of his supporters who just have no interest in union. They’re convinced, despite no evidence, that the Left is hell bent on killing or enslaving them (lol) and that their only recourse is to kill everyone opposing them first (holy crap).

    El Paso. Pittsburgh. The plot to execute Whitmer. The terrorists captured on their way to Philly. The death threats to Republican election officials in Philly and Georgia. The assault on the Capitol, with people actively hunting our #2, 3, and 4 in the line of succession.

    The Far Right has become American Isis. Which is why Republicans like Liz Cheney are finally breaking with them. The assault on the Capitol is increasingly looking like a watershed event. The moment when people realized this wasn’t just some random nut jobs overreacting to rhetorical exaggeration.

    My mother in law is terrified of these bogeymen she keeps hearing about on Fox News and Facebook. I keep reminding her that Democrats are her daughter, her daughter’s friends, probably some members of her church who have been intimidated into hiding their political leanings. Good people, just like her.

    Dawg fans come from all facets of the political spectrum, and when we talk football, we see each other’s good side and humanity. And then politics happens, and we lose our ability to disagree respectfully.

    This isn’t about Democrats versus Republicans for me anymore and hasn’t been for awhile. It’s Moderates versus Extremes. I refuse to see my option as one extreme or the other, which extreme scares me more.

    That’s the Union I am pursuing. Because it’s most of us, when you turn off cable news and social media.

    Liked by 6 people

  11. mddawg

    “And why is there no embrace of respecting differences of opinion?”

    There are some opinions that are so deeply rooted in people’s perceptions of right and wrong that it leaves little room for compromise. One example of this might be single-issue voters who cast their vote based solely on a candidate’s position on abortion, or gun control, and so on.

    Beyond that, we have to recognize that we aren’t (and haven’t been for some time now) dealing with differences of opinion. We’re dealing with differences in what people accept as fact. Just looking at some of the exchanges above, people don’t even agree on whether massive voter fraud occurred or not in this last election. And that’s just one in a long line of examples we could come up with. I’m not sure how you overcome that to reach a productive discussion or a compromise.

    Liked by 1 person

    • tenesseewasnevergreat

      You start by blocking the opposition’s ability to share their opinion online, apparently.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Derek

        Or their capacity to plan insurrections.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Why yes, many free market companies have wisely decided neo-nazis don’t need access to their platform to spread BS and recruit.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Smoky Joe Would

          The problem with this is that the Ayatollah still has his Twitter feed up, is he not actively trying to spread BS and recruit people? The double standard is the problem. Those free market companies can ban whoever they want, but don’t say it is for American safety when ISIS has a Facebook page.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Derek

            You’re lying:

            https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-53389657

            If they are welcome then why are they dodging?

            Like

          • unionjackgin

            Lest we forget that these are multi-national companies operating in countries with different laws and policies than the US. If the cost of doing business in a place like Iran, China, Russia, etc is operating in a manner different than that of the US, the company has to make the decision if it worth that cost. Factors for that include whether the negative of giving the Ayatollah a twitter feed is outweighed by the positive of the people of Iran getting access to Western social media channels/feeds. Money is a big part (if not the biggest part) of that equation so it not just about “freedom.”

            However, we have seen time and time again where the people access to modern social media networks have allowed the West to see what is happening autocratic states where other forms of media have been restricted or cancelled.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Tony BarnFart

              So the power to roil (or not) the politics of the entire globe depending on whether you are selectively operating under the morality standard (US) or a bottom line standard (the Ayatollah), all in the hands of a few major companies ? Man, that almost sounds akin to a government actor.

              What could possibly go wrong ?

              Like

              • unionjackgin

                By your analysis then … Coca-Cola is the world’s government. It operates every country but two (Cuba & N. Korea.) Do you think that it only observes US law in all those other countries?

                These organizations are operating just like other multi-national corporations operate in places like Iran, Russia, Kazahkstan, Uzbekistan, Pakistan, China, etc. They all have different laws and regulations. Again – they could choose to not operate in that country but they have decided that the investment (no matter how distasteful to the public here) is worth it.

                Perhaps if enough people stopped using the social media services here due to the company policies in Iran, they might change their mind.

                Like

                • Tony BarnFart

                  Except that coca-cola is selling a soft drink, not acting as the gateway for discussing ideas or the modern public sqaure. Yes, both private companies, but so were Carnegie’s steel mills that exploited their employees. Wonder where we’d be if the “don’t like it, work somewhere else or start your own steel mill” crowd prevailed.

                  Like

    • HirsuteDawg

      I’ve never understood single issue voters. Now I am one. When an elected official of my state tries to discard the vote of a majority of the voting citizens it is time to make sure that they don’t get a chance to “represent” use ever again.

      Liked by 2 people

  12. Hey Derek. How do professional trolls get paid anyway? Is it per post, or per response? Asking for a friend.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Derek

      Ask boner.

      Otherwise, it would appear to me that your comment is really about your rhetorical impotence in this forum more than anything else.

      Why not just go watch cartoons instead of feeling worthless and insignificant and lashing out here? Maybe a price is right rerun is on. You know something on your intellectual comfort level.

      Like

  13. Greg

    ” What can we all do to keep working toward a more perfect union?”

    you can start with listening & then processing. without it….you get nowhere.

    Liked by 3 people

  14. It starts and ends with emotional maturity to handle that someone else has a difference in opinion, and that’s okay. Also understanding that, regardless of transfers of power, that your essential rights and freedoms are guaranteed under the Constitution, and though some amendments can be made, those essential freedoms aren’t going anywhere.

    My plea would be that social media platforms be relegated back to entertainment only, because the lunatic fringe on both sides have been amplified on these platforms while sense and sensibility has been muted. Because social media has the AI to personalize messaging you see, people of smaller mental capacity begin to believe that the fringe narratives and beliefs are status quo and popular thought, which they are not.

    I challenge my family, who gets incensed by these things, to look outside the door of their house and realize that the country isn’t burning down to the ground, we aren’t in a second civil war, and that the vast VAST majority of Americans are level-headed and proud of their nation, though disappointed in the actors within it. Those actors are politicians who stoke emotions for the sake of votes, media outlets that have become more sensationalized entertainment venues than actual impartial reporting agencies, and then, ultimately, us for not demanding that those who are shaking the tree stop it for the sake of humanity.

    It’s a falsehood for anyone to believe that we agree on all things, even if we subscribe to the same political party. It’s a similar to falsehood to assume that all people who are conservative supported the events and false narratives that resulted in the stupidity that occurred on January 6th, as it would be that all people who are liberal supported looting and violence that occurred throughout the summer along with the political cheerleading of those acts in the name of currying favor from voters.

    2020 will hopefully be used as a case study in political science and social studies classes for years to come on the culpability of the government in either quelling and encouraging social justice and understanding, or stoking the fire and making it substantially worse. Factually, though, 2020 was the crescendo of twenty years of finger pointing and name calling, starting with Bush stepping all over the rights to privacy by that administration in the name of domestic safety, the rush to judgment on people of middle eastern descent as possible public enemies, the leading to a period of politics during the Obama administration where people were broadly labeled as racists if they disagreed with the Democratic platforms during said time, which ultimately contributed to the election of Trump in 2016. The four years since have been an unending nightmare, from both sides. Four years of “not my president” on one side and allegations of election fraud and the continued labelling of conservatives as racists and fascists, with name calling and a refusal to compromise or work with other party from the Commander in Chief AND likewise labelling and posturing of liberals as snowflakes and socialists, and this year became the proverbial political pimple that popped and the pus is all over the place. Now everyone is pointing fingers and the divide is greater, and no one is willing to hear anything from the other side that might sound like sense or compromise because the powder keg has been lit and it’s gone off.

    In short, we need to mute the lunatics and let common sense prevail, lay responsibility and accountability on those responsible for the false messaging and empty narratives, accept responsibility for what we allowed to happen and mutually agree to be better, and quit painting each other in such massively board strokes. People who work in broad strokes struggle with the finer details in life, and that’s what we’re missing in our country today.

    Liked by 8 people

    • PTC DAWG

      Well said.

      Like

    • Ran A

      Well written. Would add that we can go all the way back to GWB with “not my President”. Maybe even the latter part of the Clinton years.

      It’s kill or be killed from both parties and there is a large portion of people who are just worn thin from all of this. I think a 3rd party is coming. It will take some time to become a factor, but there are many independents (including me) that is willing to look for a common sense group that will force the other two to work together. it’s exhausting.

      Like

      • I’ll be very interested in that, when it happens.

        Like

      • DawgFlan

        One word: Gingrich

        I didn’t like him when I was a Republican, and the precedents and chaos he set into motion only become clearer in retrospect.

        “A number of scholars have credited Gingrich with playing a key role in undermining democratic norms in the United States, and hastening political polarization and partisan prejudice. According to Harvard University political scientists Daniel Ziblatt and Steven Levitsky, Gingrich’s speakership had a profound and lasting impact on American politics and health of American democracy. They argue that Gingrich instilled a “combative” approach in the Republican Party, where hateful language and hyper-partisanship became commonplace, and where democratic norms were abandoned. Gingrich frequently questioned the patriotism of Democrats, called them corrupt, compared them to fascists, and accused them of wanting to destroy the United States.”

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newt_Gingrich

        Liked by 1 person

        • Right. The story of LBJ accusing his opponent of beastiality was all about unity.

          Like

          • DawgFlan

            Asymmetry. Look it up.

            Because acts of constitutional hardball are seen as provocative and high-stakes, they tend to invite a response. Often this response involves another act of constitutional hardball. And just as in the schoolyard, the question of who started it arises and becomes part of the dispute itself… Whichever side resorts to hardball, the other side will follow suit in a predictable sequence of tit-for-tat. We agree that constitutional hardball lends itself to retaliation and escalation—and that both Democratic and Republican officeholders engage in it to some substantial extent.

            Yet even if constitutional hardball is by nature reciprocal, it none­theless remains possible that one side may play hardball more frequently or intensively than the other side over a sustained period of time. This is what we submit has happened for the past quarter century or so, since roughly the Gingrich Revolution… Con­stitutional hardball remains reciprocal but not symmetrical. One party, the Republican Party, has become especially identified with hardball tactics during this period, with large consequences for our constitutional system.

            https://columbialawreview.org/content/asymmetric-constitutional-hardball/

            Like

            • Derek

              There’s no proof that LBJ actually accused a candidate of such a thing. There is a legend that it happened. There is also the legend that lbj told it as a story about some other texas politician. Wouldn’t be the first time a pol told a funny story that weren’t true. Given the time and place, it would have no doubt been a democrat on democrat political crime no matter who did it. Republicans were not competing for any offices in Texas at that time.

              It took liberals giving black folks rights to turn texas red.

              Like

              • DawgFlan

                You are correct on LBJ. I was just addressing all the whataboutism throughout the comments. Just because a counter-example of human failure or political hardball can always be provided, it doesn’t make the situations equivalent or use of such tactics symmetrical.

                Like

            • If history started in the 1990s, you are correct. But the fact is that FDR was playing hardball before Newt was even born.

              Like

  15. The lying, liberal media is saying that I didn’t win the Lottery last night.

    But I know I won it, in a landslide.

    Liked by 4 people

  16. PTC DAWG

    Not giving up. >>>>>>>>>

    Like

  17. amurraycuh

    I would like to see a suggestion to how we prevent “rampant voter fraud” in the future. What are large-scale viable ways to prevent this fraud that are not subject to discrimination charges?
    Could it be that what we just experienced is what happens when access to voting is not hindered?

    Like

    • gastr1

      Jesus Christ, the first thing you have to do is FIND it.

      When you find it, we will ALL want to fix it, because I tell you as a seriously left-side libtard myself, I have NO interest in voter fraud or election malfeasance. NONE.

      Liked by 8 people

      • How about dead people voting which has been identified in multiple locations? How about people who moved out of a state and voted in both states?

        Like

        • gastr1

          I agree that those are concerns and should be stopped.

          In Georgia in 2020, Brad Raffensperger answered the dead people question. He’s a Republican. Gabe Sterling answered explained this same way. He’s a Republican. They also explained the vote out of state question. They were all over the media giveing interviews and explanations about this. I invite you to read/watch them.

          Back when Kris Kobach was Attorney General of the Great State of Kansas, he went on a very aggressive campaign to find double voters in multiple states. He turned up two. That was, I think, 2014, 2015.

          Again, if this is happening, pretty much every libtard I know is on board with finding it and stopping it. But Repoubicans who have tried to find these cases have yet to find them in even double-digit quantities.

          Again, I agree that we should do everything we can to not allow election fraud or voter fraud. Any kind of false voting must be discounted.

          Liked by 7 people

          • gastr1

            Apologies, didn’t mean to misspell “Republicans” up there, that wasn’t some kind of trolling re-name.

            Like

          • gastr1

            Also, if you have info re “dead people voting which has been identified in multiple locations”, I’d to take a look at it, because I’m genuinely interested in being informed about this topic. I have not seen specific info beyond what I listed above, i.e., Georgia 2020 and Kansas in 2014-15.

            Liked by 1 person

          • The problem with voter fraud is it’s extremely hard to detect. You don’t have one system or database of record.

            Maintenance of the voter rolls needs to be controlled in an objective manner according to state law.

            I think everyone can agree that we all want elections to be fair and for all legally cast votes to be counted. When that happens, everyone can agree to honor the outcome, figure out why you lost or won, and determine what to do differently the next time.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Then let’s put our exceptionalism to the side, and take a page from other countries:
              Voting day is a national holiday
              Same voting registration / process nationwide
              No more Electoral college
              No campaign ads on TV / YouTube / Streaming — your key platform goes on the ballot, and the rest goes down to your website, debates, GOTV efforts etc. and a quarter of a billion dollars doesn’t get wasted on variations of people saying “radical liberal” and “lied” over and over and over. (Added bonus: it would force many political consultants out of DC, and they’re by far some of the most cynical useless assholes — for both sides.)

              Liked by 3 people

              • 1) No problem with that. The problem is most small businesses still wouldn’t be able to have Election Day as a holiday.
                2) Sort of agree but the devil is in details of what does that mean.
                3) Vehemently disagree – a popular vote really means the major cities determine who is the President.
                4) Vehemently disagree – there’s this little thing called freedom of speech that’s guaranteed in the Constitution.

                Like

                • Smoky Joe Would

                  (3) I agree on getting rid of the Electoral College would be a bad idea, it still amazes me the foresight that the Founding Fathers had to head that off.
                  (4) I think that TV providers (cable, satellite, streaming services) should offer, at election times, a channel that undecided voters can turn to and get all of the candidate commercials that they want. Once you have decided, you can not tune into that channel and not have to listen to that endless cacophony of just saying how bad your opponent is.

                  Like

                • Regarding #4, you do know the 1st Amendment does not include “freedom to access a massive platform” right? You can set up a press conference and say whatever you want — you’re not owed an audience.
                  And for #3, why is a system where sparsely populated areas carrying more sway than the places where businesses are headquartered and most voters live better?

                  Like

                • The government telling TV stations they can’t run political ads and telling candidates amd others they can’t run TV ADs is a restriction on free speeach. If a station doesn’t want to accept them, that’s their right.

                  I assume you must be from a big city if you believe in the popular vote is the best way to select a nationwide candidate. The more populous states already have more voice in the electoral college. You may have a point if each state only had one vote, but that’s not the way it works.

                  Like

              • By the way, I totally agree about the political consultants on both sides … you want to know who the real grifters are … it’s that bunch.

                Liked by 1 person

            • Derek

              Its also near impossible to commit voter fraud.

              Like

        • debbybalcer

          That did not happen in wide numbers. With early voting someone could vote then die but the idea that Democrats needed to cheat to win is one of the problems with our country. I am a Republican that voted for a libertarian last election and voted Democrat this time. I voted absentee this year because of the pandemic. Voting by mail was just as secure as voting in Person except for the worry about the postal system not delivering mail. The democrats turned out their voters who have not been voting because they believed their votes did not matter. Massive Voter fraud allegations seek to delegitimize Americans because they vote differently. Also not addressed to to you but people in general please stop the name calling it is childish. We need to act like grownups.

          Liked by 9 people

          • Russ

            Well said, Debby. BTW, I’m in the same boat as you. I’ve always considered myself Republican and mostly conservative. In 2016 I voted Libertarian because I couldn’t stand either candidate and figured there was no way we (collectively) were stupid enough to elect a thrice-bankrupt “businessman”-reality TV host.

            I learned my lesson this election and voted for Biden and voted against anyone that allied themselves with Trump. I’m hoping the next election we get someone who is under 80 and is a true moderate (from either party).

            Liked by 3 people

    • HirsuteDawg

      Easy peasy – just remove all the votes for the democratic candidate.

      Like

    • Blockchain is probably the most secure option. But one party will right against election security tooth and nail.

      Like

    • Don in Mar-a-Lago

      Liked by 1 person

  18. gastr1

    Holy crap, we’re 100 posts in and Napoleon Nutter Fart hasn’t shown up yet. Maybe the feds caught up with him after Wednesday?

    I kid. (But maybe I don’t.)

    Liked by 3 people

    • Your name calling is appreciated. It’s a really strong argument in your favor. Like calling Trump Drumpf. Brilliant.

      Like

      • gastr1

        Was going to call you “Napoleon Troller Fart” when you finally made you non-UGA football appearance. Are you texting us from a jail cell somewhere, Insurrectionist Warrior? LOL

        Like

      • gastr1

        Were you the one with the horns and face paint or the idiot with his job ID around his neck as he stormed the Capitol? Did your rejection of the socialist mask mandate make you easier to track by the FBI? Oh…maybe you’re actually antifa posing as an insurrectionist. Almost forgot for a second that you might be on the other team false-flagging your way through all of this.

        Like

      • gastr1

        One more point: Someone with a tag as inane as yours has already self-name-called. So I guess that attempted point about name-calling is only too apropos to who/what you already claim to be.

        There. Have a nice rest of the day in your cell, buddy.

        Like

  19. Ozam

    Senator….imho I think GTP needs to be a no politics zone other than sports related (even the Playpen). I respect it is yours to do with as you please, but nothing good comes from the ranting, no one is going to change their views, and it just tears down any sense of community. Sigh……

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Don in Mar-a-Lago

    Big strong locked cocked and loaded militiamen with tears in their eyes came up to me and said, Sir, Mr. President, Sir, why are many people, even Moscow Mitch, saying this because you look just like Buffalo Bill when you put the freedom lotion on their skin

    Liked by 2 people

  21. dawgphan34

    In 60 years UGA has gone from 0% of the students being Black to 8%, in a state that is 32% Black. The public state university has a responsibly to better present the people of the state. UGA has not done a very good job representing everyone in the state.

    UGA has to do better.

    Liked by 5 people

    • munsonlarryfkajim

      for UGA to admit someone, they need to have a high school diploma received in the recent past. Lets recut your 32% data with that in mind and see what it shows. Probably not as stark if a difference as your post would suggest.

      Like

    • gurkhadawg

      I don’t know about UGA, but I do know about The Medical College of Georgia. I know a couple of people on the admissions committee. They are disgusted by the by the actions of some members of the committee and the current rules of who gets in and who doesn’t. Candidates who have outstanding academic qualifications are turned away so candidates with, uhmm “other qualifications “ can be admitted. I think that your conclusions are probably total BS.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Black applicants should probably lie about their race to get some of the white privilege.

      Like

    • mddawg

      If there are discriminatory barriers in place which are preventing people of any sex, race, religion, etc. from being admitted to UGA, then those barriers should be removed. However even if every barrier was removed that doesn’t necessarily guarantee that the makeup of the student body would exactly reflect that of the entire state. The only way to do that would be to institute some sort of quota system, which would in itself be discriminatory.

      I know we’ve still got a lot of work to do in this country to ensure everyone has equal opportunity and equal treatment under the law, but equal opportunity will never guarantee equal outcomes.

      Like

      • gurkhadawg

        Why doesn’t the racial composition of the football, basketball, golf and tennis teams accurately reflect the racial composition of the state of Ga or of the USA? Hint: merit.

        Like

        • Derek

          I think it may be just a tad more complicated than that….

          There may be a fair disagreement about what, if anything, to do about it, but there is a reason that boxing is dominated by blacks and latinos. Its not because we can’t fight.

          Its because we don’t have to. There are societal reasons why we no longer have to.

          “Merit” sort of glosses over a lot of factors that lead to who is or isn’t part of a group for consideration of their relative merit.

          I would agree with you that we don’t just racially proportion the student body or the basketball team upon census data. However, we should recognize some responsibility for those who are continually left behind and ensure that opportunity is there for everyone.

          Not to be confused with ensuring outcomes.

          Like

          • gurkhadawg

            There are plenty of whites in MMA. But overall we agree on this. I can tell you for a fact that there is no racial discrimination in the admissions policies of MCG unless you count the discrimination against white males. So I’m not sure what “we can do better “ means except that it sounds nice to say.

            Like

            • Derek

              I would suggest that there was a time when the were signs in America that said:

              No Dogs
              No Irish

              We could have done better. Ultimately we did.

              No different here.

              If you think every American that gets born starts at the same starting line and runs the same race, you’re being naive.

              Again, I don’t suggest that we force outcomes to create an artificial appearance of fairness. That, as you are expressing, foments resentment.

              I think we can do better in terms of making sure that every American has the opportunity to maximize their talents and ambitions. We’ve continually made progress along those lines and no one now wonders whether Irish, Italian or Jewish people are being held back from their dreams and ambitions, anti-Semitism notwithstanding.

              We not there yet with respect to people of color whose differences are both immutable and consequential. We’re just not. We will be. Just a matter of when and who wants to be part of the solution and who wants to be part of the problem until we get there.

              And that is one place I would endorse bothsiderism.

              Like

              • gurkhadawg

                We agree. I’m not arguing that everything is perfect and we all start equally. That’s never been the case. If someone is good looking and athletic they have a huge advantage in life. The same for great social skills. Hell, if you’re a good looking women, with great social skills you’re pretty much born on third base. Anyone who reflects honestly on their life experiences knows that is true.

                Like

  22. Biggen

    I know we like to say “That doesn’t happen with Democracy” but you have to wonder how long Republics can really last. Rome did it for nearly 500 years. Other have done it for various lengths of time. They all seem to fail at some point however.

    If Trump would keep his mouth shut it would have been a landslide. Hell, he almost won even WITH saying the dumb stuff that comes out of his mouth.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Don in Mar-a-Lago

    Like

  24. godawgs1701

    Ms. Hunter-Gault’s book about her experienced integrating UGA were on the list of required books for one of my freshman English classes at Georgia and it was so riveting and so embarrassing to me. If you’ve never read it, you should. To read about such horrible things happened in a place that’s so special to me was shameful. She tells a story about Georgia losing a basketball game at Stegeman and then an angry crowd coming from the game to the quad ourside her room at Myers Hall to yell obscenities at her half the night… shameful. And not nearly so long ago as we’d like to think.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Illini84

    A man who was photographed wearing a sweatshirt that read “Camp Auschwitz” while inside the Capitol last week was arrested in Newport News, Va., on Wednesday morning in connection to the Capitol riot, according to two law enforcement officials.

    The man, Robert Keith Packer, had been seen on the Capitol grounds in several photographs and his black sweatshirt, with its reference to the Nazi death camp and a skull, had drawn widespread outrage. News outlets had previously identified Mr. Packer based on the accounts of people who knew him.

    Mr. Packer’s sweatshirt also included the phrase “Work Brings Freedom,” which is a rough translation of, “Arbeit macht frei.” The German words were welded onto an iron arch that stood over one of the gates of the death camp, where more than 1.1 million people were killed during World War II.

    The top federal prosecutor in Washington said this week that more than 70 people tied to the mayhem at the Capitol had already been charged with crimes and that he expected that “hundreds” would eventually be charged. Prosecutors were considering bringing a range of charges against the rioters, including seditious conspiracy, murder and trespassing. Michael Sherwin, the acting U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, said that investigators had already identified at least 170 people who are believed to have committed crimes.

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  26. Don in Mar-a-Lago

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  27. Don in Mar-a-Lago

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  28. Don in Mar-a-Lago

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  29. Butler Reynolds

    The professor of my freshman history class at UGA invited Hamilton Holmes to come speak about his experience as a student. When you’re 19 like I was, something that happened almost 30 years earlier seemed like ancient history. The world he described sounded like ancient history, too. He might as well have been talking about travelling on the Oregon Trail.

    Looking back on it now, it’s amazing at how quickly things changed in a very short period of time. Dr. Holmes was an impressive man. He spoke matter-of-factually and without contempt. He related his story without demeaning anyone and without attempting to make his audience of students feel guilty or uncomfortable.

    His story was authentic and heroic, but not over-the-top Hollywood material. Unlike Charlene, he lived off-campus and he said that he spent no more time on campus than he had to.

    He said that his situation was sort of a blessing for him. He said that he was having way too much fun at Morehouse before coming to UGA. All he could do in Athens was go to class then come directly back to his bedroom to study. Because of the lack of distractions, he was certain that he would not have achieved the same level of professional success.

    From that history class all I can remember is that the professor was a pompous ass who had quite a lofty impression of himself. In fact, I don’t remember much of anything from my classes at UGA. Hamilton Holmes visit is one great exception that has survived the decades.

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    • unionjackgin

      I was in freshman English class with Hamilton Jr. Good guy – at the time as a nitwit 17 year old, I had no idea of his father’s impact and legacy at UGA.

      Also to echo the sentiments from above – its pretty disgraceful that just 8% of the University is AA in a state where 32% is African-American.

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      • Butler Reynolds

        “its pretty disgraceful that just 8% of the University is AA in a state where 32% is African-American.”

        It might not be disgraceful at all. I’ve not looked up any of the numbers but here are some things that come to mind:
        1) It’s tough to get in to UGA. A lot of non-AA folks with good grades apply to UGA today and get turned down. No way many of my friends or I could get in today.
        2) What % of the Georgia AA population wants to or tries to get in to college?
        3) What % of Georgia’s college bound AA population chooses instead to segregate themselves at a HBCU instead? Like Hamilton Holmes said in his speech that day, he was having a good time at Morehouse and he did not want to leave. One of my co-workers went to Fort Valley State. From his stories, he had a lot more fun there than I had in Athens.
        4) Of what’s left, how many really want to go to UGA? Athens is a bit out of the way from everywhere. Back in my day there weren’t as many affordable options close to home. Today, UGA is more of a luxury option for competitive students. I don’t think I’d be going there if I was 18 today.
        5) Besides, it’s a different environment than 1961. Those folks in Athens would trip over their dicks to get more AA students in there!

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        • dawgphan34

          I dont know what is in your heart, but I do know that all of those excuses you made for UGA’s failure to represent the population of Georgia are extremely racist.

          I know that you are going to have a negative reaction to that and probably get defensive. I understand, but know that thinking that Black students arent competitive enough and that explains why their representation is so low is very racist.

          You can change. You can be a better person. Or you can lash out and bury your head in the sand. That’s your choice.

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          • Got Cowdog

            Honest question: Does the University of Georgia’s application ask for your race, if so… why?
            I don’t remember if mine did or not.

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          • gurkhadawg

            So you’re saying Kirby smart is racist and hates white people? If not, then why is the football team not 68% white?

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  30. Don in Mar-a-Lago

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  34. ericstrattonrushchairmandamngladtomeetyou

    As someone who has witnessed the Senator go off on people who posted about baseball and basketball here because “this is a football blog” I feel compelled to ash: “ What has this got to go with football?”

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  35. Don in Mar-a-Lago

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  36. Don in Mar-a-Lago

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  38. Don in Mar-a-Lago

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  39. Don in Mar-a-Lago

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  40. Don in Mar-a-Lago

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  42. Don in Mar-a-Lago

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    • Don in Mar-a-Lago

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  43. Don in Mar-a-Lago

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  44. Derek

    Did a sweet old lady beat a Capitol police officer to death with a fire extinguisher?

    Asking for a moron.

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    • When children worship places of power that are home to professional crooks and liars, we have failed as a country. Children and the mentally deficient believe that powerless individuals and businesses should be attacked because racism. But powerful government institutions should be protected from the scary ladies with MAGA hats. Unless it’s 2016 and Russia hacked everything. Then we undo the election.

      It’s really not hard!

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  45. Derek

    “Strong evidence supports that the intent of the Capitol rioters was to capture and assassinate elected officials in the United States government” prosecutors wrote.

    Try and whataboutism that.

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  46. Derek

    I think it would be very interesting to see the right wing, having attacked the capitol and killed and attacked law enforcement officers, to now go even further and demean the role of the military in protecting the people’s government.

    Only a treasonous anarchist would suggest that Americans should tolerate our elected representatives being placed under threat without response ir a show of force.

    These would be the same lying assholes who had no problem with the beatdowns that allowed the trump Bible photo op. Because protecting the dictatorship is important and stuff. I mean 80 million americans wanted him put on the street! How do you NOT meet that threat with force? You’d have to be an american to see it any other way.

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    • I’m with you, baby. Might makes right. We needed to burn down those minority owned businesses to save them from oppression. But taking selfies in the offices of millionaires on Capitol Hill can’t be allowed. Put those proles in their place!

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