It takes a village to scout a child.

I have no idea who this is ($$)

Andrew Ivins, the director of scouting at 247Sports, was enjoying a margarita by the pool — on one of those rare Saturday afternoons that he wasn’t at a combine or a 7-on-7 tournament — when his phone rang.

A former national coach of the year was calling to find out why one of the high school seniors he’d just signed had slipped down the industry’s composite rankings.

… but I’m pretty sure I know who it isn’t.

“Some recruiting departments are fine-tuned, well-oiled machines,” Ivins said. “Georgia has like 20 staffers in their recruiting department who all have a computer. Other schools don’t have that luxury.

That brings to mind something I wrote when Richt was fired.

If you watched any of the Iron Bowl broadcast this past Saturday, as I did, you might have noticed a discussion Gary and Verne had about the number of staffers Alabama had up in the coaches booth.  Lundquist was certain it was fifteen and damned if it didn’t look like it when the CBS camera panned the booth.  That room was crowded.

I mention this story not in a fit of jealousy, nor to condemn another program’s wasteful spending.  Rather, it’s a perfect example of what the Georgia Way is up against.  Regardless of where you think Richt falls on the performance spectrum, you cannot deny that for the bulk of his time in Athens, he was not allowed the resources to duke it out with Georgia’s main rivals.

That seems like such a quaint concern now, doesn’t it?

20 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, Recruiting

20 responses to “It takes a village to scout a child.

  1. Granthams Replacement

    Another reminder of how incompetent Greg was at his job.

    Liked by 10 people

  2. Russ

    Won’t anyone think of the Reserve Fund?

    /s

    Liked by 8 people

  3. debbybalcer

    Richt knew it but was classy enough not to call the university out about it. They did not even support salaries for his staff. His Parkinson’s was affecting him but those facts hurt his competitiveness before Parkinson’s.

    Like

    • southgadawg1

      Richt is a great guy but at some point you aren’t being classy and are letting yourself be run over. God bless him, Bowden was right about him, too nice for that job.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. voxdawg

    The future is now.

    Like

  5. archiecreek

    It’s GREAT to be a GEORGIA BULLDAWG!!

    Like

  6. Catfish

    The older I get, the better I was.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Hogbody Spradlin

    Related issue: I’ve always felt that the reach of Tide Football in Alabama would have made the Birmingham papers kill a story like the one Chip Towers wrote. The whole state in on the fix.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. In my opinion, “The Georgia Way” turned out to be a false narrative that allowed us to make excuses for Richt. If it had really existed then Kirby would not have been given the resources he asked for from day one. Instead, he came in with a solid business plan. He had the skill set needed to aquire funding, hire the right people, and subsequently manage his plan to great success. I think the constant claim that the guy before him wasn’t allowed the same opportunity is an unfair assessment that would unjustly put an asterisk next to Kirby’s. Again….just my humble opinion. Don’t throw rocks at me.

    Liked by 1 person

    • When Richt was at his best, he had to deal with Michael Adams. Morehead has been much more willing to provide support to all of the athletic program. There’s a reason Morehead is the president of the SEC now, the NCAA D1 council/board, and on the National Football Foundation board.

      Liked by 2 people

    • I think it’s not a Zero-sum game. I think you can absolutely blame Richt for not being more outspoken and even public with his concerns, but you can also blame the existing leadership at the time for not seeing the problem themselves. For all those big salaries that the university leadership collected, they didn’t exactly do a good job of foreseeing the direction the sport was going and the impact it could have had positively on the university if they had made changes.

      Richt did the best he could with what he got, but he should have pushed harder for more. Leadership kept costs low, but didn’t adequately support their athletic department to put them in the best position to win and create positive momentum for the school.

      Like

  9. stoopnagle

    Suspects on the COTY who was worried about what others think:

    Kirk Ferentz (2002 – really), Chip Kelly (2010), Brian Kelly, Gus Bus, Dabo, Chadwell, Harbaugh.

    Saban has also won it, but he’s not caring about this any more than Kirby would. And you can strike Chadwell, I think.

    I think Dabo or Harbaugh. Maybe Brian Kelly.

    Like

  10. W Cobb Dawg

    I’m just glad Adams and Greg Mediocrity were still alive to see how great the team could be after they were out of the picture.

    But now that the point is proven feel free kick to step in front of an oncoming bus, gentlemen.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. brigadedawg

    Reading your blog about Richt firing in 2015 and we were like Missouri level bad when it came to supporting the program. And we wonder all those years why we couldn’t get over the hump. We could have played 20 more seasons under McGarity and those conditions and still wouldn’t be over the hump honestly.

    Like

  12. Gaskilldawg

    I am not persuaded by the “IT was prudent for McGarity to give Richt all he asked for because Richt hadn’t proven that he could win more games if given more resources ” defense of McGarity. My reason is that McGarity allowed Smart to immediately have more resources than McGarity had afforded Rhict without Smart having ever won a game.
    It is water under the bridge and I am glad Smart works for bosses who understand that the purpose of the millions of dollars going into the football program is go provide resources, not to increase a reserve fund.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. 123 Fake St

    Why aren’t these being posted daily on TheDawgBone.com?

    Anybody else noticing this?

    Liked by 2 people

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