“We’re firmly middle class people, we’re not Magill Society people…”

If you haven’t read Marc Weiszer’s piece on the Magill Society, by all means take the time to do so.  He does a terrific job of contrasting the relentless determination at Butts-Mehre to find a way to squeeze every drop out of a fan base energized by Kirby Smart’s success…

A $30.2 million indoor practice facility, a $63 million upgrade to the west end zone of Sanford Stadium and the still to come new football center that will house the two-time SEC East champions with a price tag that could be in the $80 million range, were built in part on handshakes and backslaps with those with deep pockets.

They are members of the Magill Society, whose entry costs $25,000 to be paid over a five-year period.

What that gets is added points in Georgia’s ticket priority system (1.5 points for every $1 donated), a chance to improve their seating in Sanford Stadium, secure tickets to prime games away from Athens, invitations to private dinners and extra attention from the powers that be at Georgia.

“If we want to play at a certain level, it costs a lot of money,” McGarity said.

… with the resignation of that same fan base that knows what’s going on and realizes there’s little to be done about it.

“It has all become such a cash grab,” said Dave Marler, a season ticket holder from 1978 to 2014 who gave them up after becoming disenchanted with the cost and game day experience. “The whole Magill Society thing reinforces that. … I understand the nature of the business today. What I don’t understand, and I suspect hundreds of others don’t understand, is the absolute almost neglect of those that aren’t at that level; the lack of concern for the average fan that comes and pays their money just like those folks do. … Any improvements are made with high-end donors in mind.”

Said more in sadness than in anger, and why not?  It’s the way the college athletics world works these days.

In fact, in a perverse way, you almost have to admire the hyper-tiered nature of what B-M has come up with.  There are ladders to climb within the Magill Society itself.

For Magill members, the more you give, the more you get.

“It was attractive to get the extra points associated with donating,” said Magill member Rob Mason, who lives in Atlanta and works in sales. “I understand there are a lot of people in line that are a lot older than me that have given for a long time.”

Mason said he has access to meet-and-greets, was invited to see Smart, have lunch and tour the west end zone expansion, but said the perks at the entry level aren’t overwhelming.

“It’s not like it’s a golden ticket,” he said. “It doesn’t seem like a society. It seems like within Magill there are higher tiers of being Magill. To me, if you’re going to have that type of environment, every single person in the society should have the same access.”

More than 300 people are at the $100,000 level, which gives them access to be on the field in Sanford Stadium for the Dawg Walk or at the corner of the end zone during warm-ups.

There are 64 people that have given $250,000, which can get their name on a room or a trophy case.

Those who give $100,000 in one year are part of “The Hedges.” They received invites to watch Georgia’s NFL prospects at pro day in April from a lounge and they received a chance to hear Smart speak to the small group.

About 65 people were at a Hedges dinner at Atlanta steakhouse Bone’s in June with Smart, McGarity and Georgia men’s basketball coach Tom Crean, and another 40 were expected last month to eat with Smart, McGarity and baseball coach Scott Stricklin at The Falls in Athens.

The Silver Circle counts 45 in the most exclusive group for those who give $1 million over a five-year period. Those at the level can transfer tickets after death.

The hilarious thing is that, as obvious as the money chase is, folks like Matt Borman feel as if they need to pay lip service to an egalitarian streak that nobody is buying.

“There’s a perception right now that we only care about the high-end donors and certainly we’ve got to do our best to make sure we’re taking care of those individuals, but we try to have a relationship with as many people as we possibly can that are donors to UGA and season ticket holders,” Borman said. “We care about everybody and it’s a cliché, but we want everybody to feel a part of what we’re doing.”

In other words, every wallet is special at Georgia.  It’s just that some wallets are more special than others.

There’s a legitimate question to ask about the athletics department’s focus, too.  What’s the future for the great unwashed, those members of the fan base who’ve been loyal supporters over time, but are being bypassed in favor of the Magill Society’s nouveau riche?

Rebecca Phillips wrote to McGarity at the time of the increase because she disputed Georgia’s portrayal to its athletic board that it ranked on the lower end in the SEC because she said it didn’t count contributions season ticket holders need to give to buy tickets. Georgia countered that it compared only season ticket prices.

She said if Georgia continued to increase prices, she wouldn’t be able to afford them in 20 or 30 years.

“Buying tickets is a splurge for my family and we justify it because of what the university means to us, because of what football means to us,” she said. “This is a family affair. We go together with our family. I’m a third generation Georgia marriage. All of us go together to the game and I want to be able to take my kids and teach them about Georgia football. My message to the Athletic Association is you ought not to price out the next generation. How is there going to be a new breed of Bulldogs standing ready if young families can’t afford to bring their kids?”

You have the feeling questions like that aren’t even going to be considered until Butts-Mehre runs smack dab into a financial crisis of its own making, but who’s to say when that day is coming?  That ain’t the way the Georgia Way is wired.

Mason understands the resentment of some fans not in the Magill Society.

“I would say that people in Magill feel the same resentment towards the higher tier of Magill,” he said.

Georgia says it attempts to constantly improve the fan experience for all, but Mason wants to see more “forward thinking,” with facility improvements for fans.

“I think we can afford to be more ambitious in our stadium facilities,” said Mason, who took trips to LSU and Notre Dame and doesn’t believe Sanford Stadium “measures up.”

With 16,000 ticket donors to its Hartman Fund, McGarity sees untapped potential Magill members in the fan base.

“It tells you there’s tremendous growth in that number,” he told the athletic board. “There’s tremendous upside to make those numbers go up.”

Now there’s a plan.  An exclusive stadium lounge here, a meet-and-greet with Kirby there, and pretty soon you’re talking about real money.  Maybe that’s what Borman means when he says, “We care about everybody and it’s a cliché, but we want everybody to feel a part of what we’re doing.”

Welcome to the corporatization of college athletics, folks.  Georgia is on the cutting edge.  In other words, best get used to it.  If you aren’t already, that is.

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69 Comments

Filed under Georgia Football, It's Just Bidness

69 responses to ““We’re firmly middle class people, we’re not Magill Society people…”

  1. Hogbody Spradlin

    What donation level comes with the perk that you can jump line to take a whiz in the bathroom? When you’ve reached Flomax age, that’s important!

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Georgia Way

      Rest assured, our premium areas have their own bathrooms. We even clean them.

      #COMMITMORETOTHEG

      Like

      • Tony Barnfart

        ironically (or not?) Rest Assured makes the little seat covers for #2s in public restrooms. Must be a sponsorship that makes you mention it #thegeorgiaway

        Like

  2. Dawgoholic

    Anyone have a better way for them to raise the money Kirby believes we need to compete at the highest level?

    Like

    • Maybe it’s just me, but I think yours will be a far more interesting question to ask twenty years from now, when the alienated fan base chicken comes home to roost.

      Liked by 1 person

    • I don’t think anyone truly resents the style of fund raising. The Foundation has a similar strategy to the AA. I think what people have a problem with is the double talk and the “we’ll piss down your back and tell you it’s raining” attitude from the fund raising arm of the AA. $120,000,000 in capital projects on football and no money can be found to make one of the sport’s iconic venues a more inviting place for the wallets … I mean customer.

      Throw in the traffic management, the growing restrictions on/takeover of parking, and the tailgating restrictions. I can see why the rank and file isn’t happy.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Correction – if the price tag on the new football facility is $80,000,000, that will be $170,000,000.

        Like

      • 79Dawg

        Yes, part of the problem is that the “free” stuff people used to take for granted – or which used to be called “good community outreach” – has now been ringfenced and monetized. That they can’t even bring themselves to send the coaches out to Bulldog Club meetings in the pre-season to see the hoi polloi is pretty damning!
        As the Senator alludes to above, it will probably take 15 or 20 years for all the Boomers to die off for all the “very smart people in charge” to realize they f’ed up in pricing everyone else out of the market and that their potential customers have zero interest in what they are selling….
        I say this as someone who works in a professional environment – I am the only under-50 person at our office who has tickets. Our younger folks could certainly afford season tickets, but most buy tickets for 1 or 2 games a year and that’s it, they do other stuff on the weekends now. Young professionals are the prime people McGarity, Boorman & Co. should be targeting, but c’est la vie!

        Like

        • “Our younger folks could certainly afford tickets.”

          Wasn’t the cutoff for new season ticket holders around 10,000 cumulative Hartman points last year? Young alumni are being priced out of the market.

          Like

          • 79Dawg

            My point is I know plenty of young professionals who are making good money (and who are either single, and thus have good disposable income, or are married, and have 2 incomes), and who have zero interest in buying season tickets, even if they can afford it.
            I think the $10,000 is an aberration/peak, similar to what we saw in 2008 or so. Historically speaking, it was $3-5,000 or so to get a foot in the door, so if you gave $1,000 or $1,5000 or so a year, which these people could have done fairly easily, you would have them in 2 or 3 years I think.
            Of course, if your perspective is this isn’t the crest of the wave, but the base of a larger wave, then i would agree with you that it is an unlikely any young alumni, other than Leon Farmer, IV, Don Leebern, V, etc. will ever be able to get season tickets….

            Liked by 1 person

        • JCDawg83

          You are absolutely correct 79. My daughter graduated in 2014 and is a huge Georgia fan. She and her contemporaries have no real interest in buying season tickets or going to every game. They go to one or two games a season and watch all the others at home. She had the opportunity after graduation for the university to match her donation for two years to help her build points for season tickets. I told her I would also match what she put in and she would get 4x the points for her donation. At the time, she could have gotten season tickets with a point total of around 3000 if I recall correctly. She could have easily afforded the tickets and the contribution but she ultimately decided not to because she doesn’t want to go to every game.

          The Senator thinks 20 years before the chickens come home to roost. I’m thinking more like 10. The oldest baby boomers are 73, the youngest are 55 and while there are quite a few Gen X ticket buyers, they aren’t generally as passionate or willing to fork over big money for tickets to a game they can watch on tv at home. The Gen Y and millennials aren’t a viable option to fill stadiums if that means spending big money for the privilege of buying tickets. It is not a matter of them not having the money, it’s a matter of them not wanting to spend it on that.

          Like

          • California dawg

            Geography limits the amount of games I can go to a year, but even if I lived back in Atlanta I’d probably be in the same boat as your daughter, as are many of my friends/alums of similar age. You want to go to 1-3 big home games a year, but otherwise it can be more fun hosting a game-watching party at home or hitting up a bar. The experience of watching out here in California is a blast because we have tons of alumni that pack out our UGA bars (we have 1 game-hosting bar in SF, and at least 4 in LA), which all feel like you’ve temporarily teleported to Athens for a few hours. It’s awesome.

            But yeah, it’s not about not having the money. It’s about not wanting to blow that money on cupcakes.

            Liked by 2 people

            • Bingo – I’ll always watch the Dawgs, but I skip the cupcakes @ Sanford. I like watching other (Good) football too much to spend 8-10 hours watching a glorified scrimmage in person. Usually can find some other dawg fan on FaceBook or in my office to take the tickets off my hands, usually for a discount.

              Like

          • I’ll preface my comment by saying I’m at the older end of the millenial generation (35) so my purchasing habits are still a little different than the folks in their early-mid 20’s. My family had season tix for years so every Saturday was spent in Athens for me growing up. It was absolutely a huge part of growing up. I graduated in 2007 and picked up my own season tix a few years after the 2008 price came down. I held on until the 2016 season and finally decided the hassle of trying to commute every Saturday for an increasingly shitty fan experience knowing I’d never qualify for away tix or SECCG tix wasn’t worth it anymore. I haven’t regretted it one bit and have zero desire to buy back in. All the money I would have spent on season tix went to hardscaping my backyard so I can have a nice outdoor set-up to watch the games on an inflatable projector screen with all the comforts of home steps away. We’ll still go to a home game or two every year, but we’ve mostly replaced the weekly grind by going on a couple of away road trips the last two seasons.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Dawgoholic

              Agree that they should do more with concessions and other issues that affect everyone on gameday. If it costs a little more, raise that money too.

              Like

            • Governor Milledge

              The National Championship Game and Rose Bowl came so far out of the blue that my friends (minimum donation people who are now up to ~$15k points) ended up with tickets for both based on the postseason donation/selection – no one put in for those at the time, so a lot of lower level donors landed them.

              I think it takes creativity being younger to continuing on with tickets. I am of similar age to you AuditDawg, but I go in with 3 other couples for season tickets under one account, which lets us all sit together and build up points. We’ve been watching games together since enrolling in 2003, so it makes it that much more enjoyable of an expereince. But we are already planning for the 2020 schedule, which stinks, as to whether we will sell off all our tickets for the year.

              Price-wise, it generally makes much more sense to buy tickets for the one or two home games you want to go to than for the entire season. This year, with A&M and Notre Dame, might be the only exception for a long while.

              Like

    • Dawg1

      Maybe we can go after the big oil money like they do at Texas and Oklahoma? 😁

      Like

      • Dawg1

        More honorary degrees to regular folks like T Boone Pickens or Phil Knight.

        Let’s adopt Plank from Under Armour. Why should Maryland get all his money!

        Like

      • The Georgia Way

        Rest assured, we are already in front of this. Houston and Dallas are in our private spring speaking tour rotation.

        #COMMITTOTHEG

        Like

        • The Georgia Way

          To be clear, we’re not talking about Houston County or Dallas, Georgia.

          #NATIONWIDETOTHEG

          Liked by 1 person

        • Russ

          Yeah, I think I went to the last “open” meeting in Houston a couple of years ago after Kirby’s first season. Fox was there as well. It was nice to hear them speak. I guess now only the monied donors get that opportunity.

          Like

  3. I read that article yesterday, and it depressed the hell out of me. I have 3 kids … one a May graduate, one a UGA sophomore, and one in high school. Unless they marry really well or the bubble bursts, they’ll likely not get the privilege of being a season ticket holder other than for the time that either my wife or me is alive.

    For those of us who aren’t Magill, the AD and Borman still appear to have no clue that Hartman contributors still pay the freight of funding the scholarships for everyone from football to equestrian. As the article shows, the AA is telling loyal donors, “Thanks but we don’t care about you.”

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Cynical Dawg

    It might be just me, but those “perks” that come with the higher levels of the Magill Society aren’t really that impressive. I’ll stick with the “Mancave Society” in Section HD.

    Like

    • 79Dawg

      Agreed – but the number of people who get off on being able to post pictures of themselves on the sidelines, in the recruit lounge, etc., is higher than you think….

      Like

      • Normaltown Mike

        Agree. For me this proves the value of getting donors to fork over big bucks for selling “exclusivity” which translates to things that cost little to nothing. Some guy pays 25K and he can shake Kirby’s hand. Good for him. I have no interest other than I’m glad his money went to the IAF.

        Like

    • Mick Jagger

      Yes, the experience in Athens (other than the team/game), isn’t nearly as pleasurable as it used to be.

      The big screen/grill/beer/bathroom situation at home is great. Hell, I don’t even charge admission!

      Liked by 1 person

    • 3rdandGrantham

      Love the mancave, section HD comment. Glorious.

      While as an evil 1%er I can afford to join those various societies, I can think of 100’s of better things to spend my money on.

      Like

    • The Georgia Way

      Rest assured, country club and business associates are not impressed by selfies from the ‘man cave’.

      #COMMITTOTHEG

      Like

      • Tony Barnfart

        Yes, but I’d have to ACTUALLY QUIT the country club if I wanted to be a big swingin’ dick 6 Saturdays per year. What are my golf, tennis and pool options in the Magill society ?

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Bright Idea

    Longevity/loyalty in Hartman had never really meant much to the athletic department and creating the MS simply reinforced that neglect. It was ironic that a guy was bragging to me just yesterday about taking his kid to Saturday’s scrimmage. He was invited by a MS member but my loyalty won’t even let me look through the fence at a practice. Odd indeed.

    Like

    • Chi-town Dawg

      I was a long time season ticket holder with over 125,000 cumulative Hartman points. I used to routinely give 7500 – $10,000 a year and was in the top 2% of all donor. I wasn’t a “high maintenance” alumni, but a few years ago I asked if I could get on to the field pregame with my kids and was told they had changed the requirements – you now had to give a minimum of $25,000/yr in order to get on the field. The next year I dropped my donation to $100 and gave up my season tickets. I’ve never looked back and still go to all of the games I want to attend, but that fucker McGoofy really pissed me off.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Tony Barnfart

        Wow ! You would be a red carpet donor at 99% of FBS schools. I sure hope Butts Mehre has guessed right.

        Like

        • Chi-town Dawg

          Not trying to boast, but rather reinforce the point Bright Idea made about Hartman Fund donors being relegated to second class citizens. If you’re not a MS donor, you’re a nobody. I think it’s kinda funny how the entry level MS members view themselves as second tier citizens;-)

          Like

          • Tony Barnfart

            No, I totally get it. Just never thought I’d see a day where going to a bunch of college football games is akin to joining a country club or buying a pretty nice boat. But I can’t go swimming or fishing or skiing on TV.

            Seems like they’re narrowing the base to those who have the money to do all of it, which is like a fairly narrow sliver of the population.

            Like

          • The Georgia Way

            Rest assured, we always encourage our Magill Society and Silver Circle membership to ‘do better’.

            #COMMITMORETOTHEG

            Like

    • Russ

      Why do you need to go to the scrimmages? I mean, the media gets 8 minutes to tell us everything we need to know.

      Like

  6. Gaskilldawg

    Question. If a person joins Magill at the $25,000 level with a $5,000.00 check and a pledge to pay $20,000 by August 2023 apparently he gets SEC championship game tickets guaranteed (as long as he or she buys those tickets) and away game and Bowl game tickets. What I do not know is that once he or she has paid the $2,000.00 pledge does he or she retain the right to season tickets, SEC game tickets and Bowl and away tickets without further Magill donations?

    Or must she or he make another $25,000 pledge to retain her or his lace in tickets lines after funding the pledge?

    Like

    • 79Dawg

      My understanding is that once the 5 years is up, you have to make a new pledge to remain an “insider” and keep gettting the reach arounds. If you don’t make a new pledge, all you get to “keep” are the memories and bonus points.

      Like

    • ATL Dawg

      Away game, SECC and playoff tickets are not guaranteed to MS members. They still have to meet the cutoff requirements for each game. For example, if someone with no history/points joins the MS this year and suddenly has around 40k points, they aren’t going to get tickets if the cutoff for the game in question is above 40k.

      And they only get season tickets for as long as they keep making the required donations to the Hartman Fund.

      Like

  7. KornDawg

    I’ll never qualify for SECCG tix, hell, maybe not even Florida tix, but we got a sweet little fan in the mail this year!

    Nice Animal Farm reference, btw.

    Like

  8. LC

    I’ve been a season ticket holder since 2003 (4 tickets). I had to buy SECCG & Rose Bowl tickets on the black market (worth it, tho, obviously), but did qualify for 2 NCCG tickets (too soon).
    I couldn’t sniff ND away tickets, LSU away tickets and just received the email 2 weeks ago that I didn’t quite have enough points for Vandy. Vandy. Count me in the group that loves the changes and improvements that hiring Kirby brought us, but also in the group that LOATHES the Magill Society for purely selfish reasons. A double-edged Dawg sword, if you will.
    No, I’m not going to give up my tickets and don’t see myself entering that lower tier anytime soon, either. I’ll just bark & bitch.

    Like

    • Tony Barnfart

      I think the problem then becomes, many folks under 40 see you at 16years of contributions AND STILL getting shut out of big games, so the question becomes “why.”

      Like

  9. Pedro

    You don’t 20 to 30 years just a standard run of the mill recession.

    Like

  10. Doug

    Kind of a sad metaphor for the entire country, IMHO.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Mayor

    I haven’t been to a game in Athens for years. When Mike Adams started screwing with the fans I quit going. Still love the Dawgs but my 70 inch UHD Smart tv allows me to see the game just fine.

    Like

  12. Normaltown Mike

    When they say the care about the average fan, they’re talking about not re-seating the stadium. If Georgia truly ONLY cared about money, then the seating chart would be purely based upon your score and longevity would count for nothing.

    My seats (section 136) are worth a helluva lot more than what I pay so I’m not complaining.

    Like

    • Bright Idea

      If they thought everybody in 136 would renew they’d move them to upper east end zone in a heart beat because you know some MS folks have worse seats than 136.

      Like

    • Chi-town Dawg

      Trust me – that reshuffling is coming. You can only keep the big time donors at bay for so long before they’ll be sitting between the 30 yard lines. The Florida game this year is the first shot with scaling back the tickets you can buy. It may not happen right away, but it will happen.

      Like

  13. The Georgia Way

    For those who feel left out, rest assured there is one way to solve it.

    #COMMITMORETOTHEG

    Like

  14. FlyingPeakDawg

    I suspect there IS a master plan known only to the $250k level donors. For that kind of contribution, I’d want a recliner and booze served to my seat on the 50…to hell with field access and a chat with Kirby. The problem is our old outdated stadium. Eliminating seats to cater to more high rollers is the new model, but how do you kick out 20,000 fans? Price ‘em out. Push them away. Watch them (literally) die off. When the time is right and attendance is down, look for the announcement of a major redo and a “home” season played in Atlanta and maybe 2 games in Jax while the complete gutting takes place. The new Sanford will have 70k seat back chairs like the east end and new skyboxes replacing the 600 level. Gotta thin the herd somehow. It would truly be better to build a new stadium, but of course that will never happen unless an earthquake rumbles through Athens.

    Like

  15. Dawgflan

    I’m all for the Magill Society being a “big shot” tax for people who need that sort of thing. And I’m not saying that uber-wealthy fans aren’t passionate.

    The issue is UGA is missing the boat when it comes to rewarding “passion” across all economic segments of their fan-base in ways that keep younger generations and long-time fans engaged.

    For many, UGA football is their primary financial splurge/indulgence/ritual, and makes up an overwhelming portion of their discretionary income. UGA Football is truly what many live for, as opposed to being merely another social engagement to be juggled among private clubs and arts organizations and board memberships and so forth. Let’s hope UGA (and college football) figure out a way to keep that most passionate contingent of the fan-base before its too late.

    The music industry is grappling with the same issue. When rich people get all the VIP access and most of the tickets because of their willingness to buy at inflated prices, how do you reward the hardcore fans that drive social media engagement, write the fan blogs/newsletters, want to travel to every concert, wear the t-shirt, buy the merch, and proclaim their undying devotion, all while sleeping in cars and cheap motels?

    The rewards for those with deep pockets will never go away, and I’m find with that. But just like music artists are experimenting with reward systems – points for engaging on social media (a Blutarsky bump!), streaming music, pre-ordering albums, actually using (vs. reselling) the tickets they buy, attending multiple concerts a year, buying the tour shirts, etc. – I hope UGA Football figures something out sooner rather than later.

    Like

  16. Cosimo Medici

    Pay up and shut up. The Georgia Way.

    Like

  17. ATL Dawg

    So when will the “3 points for every dollar donated” promotion start?

    Wonder what’s losing value faster…Bulldog Club points or Delta Skymiles?

    Like

  18. ilini84

    I’ve got three weeks left to retirement, my last set of f/s tix in hand and I’m ready to go. I want to keep going but there is no way I’ll be able to afford it so I just have to be thankful for what I’ve had.

    Like

  19. truck

    Talk about being in the minority. Most of my investment in UGA athletics is emotional. I went to every home game while I was a student, and have only had season tickets for one year. (Fortunately, that was 2002.) We only live 30 minutes from the stadium, so we buy from scalpers if we want to attend a game. But with age comes a desire for comfort above the “game experience.” But not one person on this page LOVES the Dawgs more than I do. I’m probably just lucky that McGarity hasn’t found a way to monetize my emotional connection to the program.

    Like

  20. Hobnail_Boot

    Step One: let people tailgate within 2 miles of the damned stadium.

    Like

  21. Whiskeydawg

    Damn. If you were alive Dan Magill couldn’t afford to get into his own society.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Granthams replacement

    I get the big money gets the great perks , it’s like that in every facet of society and always will be. What I can’t deal with is the seats my family has had for 55 years (the ones I’ve sat in for my whole life) will require a monster check for me to get when my mother passed away. With the new online pick your seat tool I probably won’t get them if I could write the check. McGoofy could care less.

    Like

    • ATL Dawg

      Good lord. If you think there’s a logjam now with regards to being able to change seat location, just imagine if everyone could pass their points/seats on to their children.

      It’s tough to get me to side with Butts-Mehre but you just did it.

      Like

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