“A better future for college football players?” Why would anybody think that’s needed?

Some thoughtful words from Bill Connelly:

Every organization has its flaws and cracks — you just never know when and how they might get exposed.

The many cracks in college football’s infrastructure — from how players are treated to the sport’s leadership vacuum — have been exposed in a single offseason.

At some point, the athletes were going to push back in force…

Here are a few examples of those cracks, just from the last couple of days:

  • From the Virginia Tech cornerback who was the first high-profile player to bail on the 2020 college football season:  “I started having deep concerns about staying healthy,” Farley wrote in the article, posted to the website on Sunday. “Guys were going home, going to Myrtle Beach, coming back to campus, and we weren’t getting tested. We’re all together, working out, close to each other, and you have no real idea who might have it, if anybody might have it. One day I looked around, and we were like 100-deep in our indoor facility, no masks. My concern grew more and more.”  Virginia Tech’s response is oh so reassuring.
  • We’re just out here getting gaslit en masse by our university.
  • “A University of Louisville athletics document that had been characterized as a pledge to follow COVID-19 protocols reads instead like a blanket release of legal claims.”
  • “The same ones handling these regulations are the ones set to make millions if we play,” Daltoso said. “If our health and safety was No. 1, we wouldn’t be on campus.”

Seriously, we’re supposed to be surprised that there’s an organized reaction to this?

And for those of you who try to split the baby by conceding the #WeAreUnited players may have a point about concern over their health and working conditions, but that their economic demands are a bridge too far, it’s not easy to separate the two, as Connelly explains.

The shame comes when you bring back athletes without centralized, enforceable health-and-safety protocols. And it comes when, after you have acknowledged the desperate importance of athletes to your school’s well-being, you continue to actively and forcefully resist these athletes’ attempts to recognize their economic rights.

The NCAA has long insisted that college athletes are normal students taking in a normal student experience. But the fact they have been on campus at all proves they’re different from normal students. That they probably will remain on campus, working to represent their school and earn it money even if or when most of the student population is away, attending school remotely during this ongoing crisis, proves they’re different.

After giving schools permission to bring players back during a pandemic and asking them to take on physical risk in the name of their university’s financial health, the NCAA continues to restrict players’ ability to make money off of their time serving said university. And if anyone remained on the fence regarding whether this sport is fair enough to the athletes who will forever be the engine of all revenue and popularity, this great paradox of 2020 should have held sway.

Another way of looking at this:  if you honestly believed before this season that players were being fairly compensated for their efforts, now that the COVID risk has been added to the pot, how can you argue they’re still being fairly compensated when nothing has changed on that side of the equation?  How far can you stretch amateurism?

124 Comments

Filed under College Football, The Body Is A Temple, The NCAA

124 responses to ““A better future for college football players?” Why would anybody think that’s needed?

  1. spur21

    Connelly a voice of reason. One thing Covid has done that is positive – it has exposed liars. Liars not just in CFB but across the board to include the media

    Liked by 1 person

  2. 3rdandGrantham

    I find it ironic that various states – such as Ohio most recently – have banned fans from attending all athletic events this fall, yet they (and respective in-state schools) are ok with moving ahead with football, which involves VERY close contact on every play.

    In other words, fans sitting 6 feet apart wearing masks = bad. Players sweating and spitting all over each other in the trenches = perfectly safe.

    Like

  3. DawgPhan

    That was my point yesterday about the number of deaths. The risk has increased dramatically. Everyone would assess that new risk at their job and want to be compensated for it.

    I didnt think that basic risk management would have been so controversial.

    Like

    • Granthams replacement

      Or quit the job that has too much risk and let someone that is comfortable with the risk/compensation step into the role.

      Liked by 1 person

      • DawgPhan

        That is obviously a solution that some, maybe many, will choose. The Va Tech player, now a Minnesota player. I would imagine more will be coming and they likely wont stop just because the season has started. At some point it becomes a problem that you can’t really solve in season.

        But the question that you keep dodging is one of basic risk management. We all do it all day long. UGA is a top school for professional risk management. It obviously applies to this situation and I think that the students are just trying to talk through that new assessment with the administration.

        Like

  4. Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

    Oh good lord, WHAT COVID RISK?

    People their age, in good health, without comorbities are under no statistical risk of death. As for any further complications, any respiratory illness, including URI’s, can cause a lessening of lung function or in the case of flu or pneumonia, cause problems worse than that.

    With projections saying that there are likely 10x more cases than that are known, it drives the mortality rate even lower.

    There are other behaviors and other parts of everyday life that are far riskier than COVID-19 for these athletes. FFS.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I agree with some of what the athletes are requesting. Some of it is a pipe dream, and others I vehemently disagree with.

      As a former mayor of Chicago once said, “Never let a crisis go to waste.”

      Liked by 1 person

      • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

        How does that change anything I’ve said? How does that change the statistical truth or any relevant data?

        In this year, the flu and pneumonia will kill more healthy people under the age of 25. Those illnesses will also pass on more lingering life-long effects.

        You can’t argue away statistical facts with anecdotes, yet that is what people who keep trying to make this argument do.

        Like

        • You asked WHAT COVID RISK?

          I answered.

          You keep focusing on death, like that’s the only possible negative outcome. It’s not.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

            I said that and have said that. Why do you and others pretend this is the only respiratory virus that leave someone with lingering effects? It’s not.

            Like

        • Doug

          In this year, the flu and pneumonia will kill more healthy people under the age of 25. Those illnesses will also pass on more lingering life-long effects.

          I’ve tried to stay out of these COVID-related threads for fear of getting pulled past the event horizon into an internet-argument black hole, but that statement is bullshit. Pure, uncut, 100% Colombian bullshit.

          Here’s an idea: Next time you’re thinking about dropping another such comment into one of these threads, just say “They need to shut up and play.” It’d be more honest, and it’d save you (and us) a lot of time.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

            Except… it’s not bullshit. At all. But you ad hominem attack as opposed to proving that it is “bulshit” sure does swing the tide, Doug.

            Like

            • CB

              If it wasn’t that big of a deal you wouldn’t be trying so pathetically hard to validate yourself in the comment section. Latin labels for opposing arguments won’t make you any less wrong. The kid at Indiana invalidates your position. Let’s hope he pulls through.

              Like

              • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

                The kid at Indiana invalidates NOTHING. And it’s not me… it’s the available data. People like you make this about me. All I’m doing is going with the available data. You’re arguing with data, not me. Do you understand what an anecdote is? This kid in Indiana doesn’t prove anything other than the data is correct.

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                • CB

                  You’re making it about you. The anti-fear warrior right? Keep typing in all caps. It won’t make you right, but it will make you seem more hysterical which is entertaining for the rest of us.

                  Like

                • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

                  I use caps for emphasis, because I honestly don’t know how to make italics work in WordPress. The usual tricks, including [I][/I] don’t seem to work. And I don’t make it about me. I make it about the data. You make it about me. The data is the data is the data. If the data changes, what I think will change. I don’t know what more to say about that.🤷🏻‍♂️

                  Like

                • CB

                  Your interpretation of the data is really what you’re championing. And it’s totally different from leading epidemiologists. You really believe college and professional leagues are simply postponing and shuttering themselves because of a hoax that only you and other right wingers on the internet have the ability to see through? Athletic departments are potentially risking tens of millions of dollars in revenue for no reason, but you just happen to have the magic ability to read the data points in a way that is superior to med school graduates with decades of experience in the field?

                  I know, I know, it’s all about controlling us so that we wear masks which will somehow translate into our enslavement right?

                  Spare us the hysterics. Just say you want college football and don’t gaf about the players. You’re correct that almost all of them will be totally fine regardless of how the virus spreads. So just admit that you’re willing to have one or two potentially die so you can be entertained. That’s what it all boils down to. Just be honest.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • Please state leading epidemiologists by name and their data.

                  Also, your right wing conspiracy hoax stuff is just way off base. Your really taking what you want to hear and spinning into “russia!”

                  Like

                • CB

                  Somebody hasn’t read the Mueller report I see. I’m sure you think Fauci is in cahoots with George Soros so let’s start with everyone at Johns Hopkins. When you convince them they’re reading their own data wrong I’ll gladly change my mind.

                  Study posted on July 29th: https://www.centerforhealthsecurity.org/our-work/pubs_archive/pubs-pdfs/2020/200729-resetting-our-response.pdf

                  “Close higher risk activities and settings in jurisdictions where the epidemic is worsening”

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                • Napoleon BonerFart

                  Well said. Science doesn’t care about your facts.
                  #WarmAndFuzzies

                  Like

          • David Chadwick

            Medically, he’s correct. We’re surrounded by viruses, bacteria and other nasties that have pronounced abilities to impair our pulmonary and respiratory systems. It’s not a unique thing to COVID. MRSA, anyone? Influenza? COVID 19 is just a new one, that like MRSA and the flu will never have a true “vaccine”.

            Like

            • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

              That last is the truth. Most novel coronaviruses don’t have a vaccine at all. Why do you think a China was trying to weaponize this one?

              And the thing is, this virus didn’t even need to be deadly to the majority of people to grind us to a halt and turn most of us into fear porn addicts.

              Maybe they were onto something?

              Like

        • Will (the other one)

          It’s August. How can you possibly extrapolate data on a novel virus and compare it to two diseases with decades of study and data? You keep saying it’s no big deal and there’s no risk — why weren’t you advising the SEC ADs when they determined all non-conference games should be cancelled? I mean your track record of predictions with this so far has been so spot-on I’m shocked The Atlantic and The Athletic aren’t begging to hire you away.

          Like

          • Napoleon BonerFart

            Do you believe that this virus is completely different from any other virus that has ever existed? That, while other virus outbreaks follow Gompertz curves, Covid will do something drastically different, despite seeming to follow such a model so far? If so, why?

            It seems the most prudent course would be to take what we know, forecast it forward based on knowledge of this virus and others, and proceed accordingly. Why would you argue that radical departure from that in favor of panic would be better?

            I know why reporters do it. Clicks. Impending apocalypse is a hell of a headline. But why would you follow suit?

            Liked by 2 people

          • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

            Will, my track record on COVID-19 predictions have been 100% correct because I’ve followed the available data and never bought into the narrative. The point I’m trying to make and have made is follow the data. If the data changes, so will what I think. Why is that an indefensible position to you? You keep denouncing available data and keep buying into the narrative, and you keep being wrong. You have yet to be right. I honestly don’t get it.

            Like

      • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

        Or maybe tell that to the Clemson football team. Remember them? The media was anxious to use them as proof of the “dangerousness” of this virus, but then when all 30-40 of them were all asymptomatic and suffered no ill effects, the media never reported that, they just conveniently forgot they existed.

        Like

        • You are now engaging in doing what you criticized just a comment or two ago. We’re done.

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          • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

            I know that. I did it to make a point.

            The point being, people can make anecdotal points in the other direction, too, but weirdly never seem to do in the discussion about CFB.

            Like

            • It’s just another “respiratory virus” like the flu, right? Wasn’t that your argument a while back? In reality, other than internet epidimiologists like you, we have no idea about the long-term effect of Covid-19 on the body, regardless of age. But hey, let’s ask these young men to take on this unknown risk because they already take other risks.

              Like

              • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

                I continue to make this point in good faith and you and others continue to have poor reading comprehension:

                ALL RESPIRATORY ILLNESSES COME WITH A RISK OF LONGTERM EFFECTS.

                Even something as minor as a URI.

                Why the people desperate to believe fear porn have now latched onto this single idea is beyond me. Oh wait, no it’s not. It’s because they’ve lost literally every single other argument to the data.

                Look, if you want to put your life on hold and spent worrying about the long term effects could be as doctors spend the next 40 years studying patients who contracted COVID-19 in 2020, well, that’s your prerogative.

                I guess we’ll see you in 2060.

                Like

                • “All respiratory illnesses come with A risk of longterm effects” is not the same as “all respitaroy illnesses come with THE SAME risk of longterm effects.” Contrary to your earlier claims, Covid-19 has killed thousands more than the flu this year (or any other year since 1918). Similarly, we do not know the long term effects of Covid-19 – this is an unknown risk as of now.

                  We do not need to wait 40 years, only until we have a vaccine or enough information to make a more informed judgements about this risk other than “it’s like the flu”. No one is saying these kids need to go into a shell for decades, but cancelling this season is the right move.

                  Like

                • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

                  I didn’t claim the flu killed more people, Senator. I said the flu has killed and will kill more healthy people under the age of 25 with no comorbities and likely even up to ages 40 or 60 as well. I haven’t seen the newest data for those age ranges yet.

                  The people who have died have been elderly with one or more comorbities, and we have mostly succeeded in protecting them – Media hero Andrew Cuomo notwithstanding. It’s amazing, but Sweden, which did nothing, has a lower per capita mortality rate than New York, which has the highest per capita mortality rate in the entire world.

                  Even more than that, studies from Sweden and Iceland show children in school are not vectors for infection, either, for teachers or family members both.

                  There is no reason for schools not to be open.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • Dawgflan

                  Sweden did not “do nothing” and most touting the initial studies on Sweden are cherry picking the information or admitting that the research is still incomplete.

                  And the same study that said kids in school wasn’t a major vector ALSO admitted they didn’t sufficiently test kids, so a lot of the conclusions are speculation.

                  They also attributed Sweden’s relatively encouraging results to a strong centralized health care system, limited travel patterns, and a self-imposed lock-down of its residents even absent gov’t regulation. The USA is known for exactly none of those things.

                  Holding up Sweden, a country just bigger than GA in population and Montana in landmass as a case study for how the entire USA should respond without looking at the vast differences in population density, travel, behaviors, health care systems, etc. seems like quite the leap of faith.

                  Like

                • We do have information though. It all says students going to class is fine. It also says that we are now facing massive increases in addiction, homelessness, businesses closed, unemployment, suicide, and now reports of hunger in children.

                  The data says the risk in younger and healthier people is insanely low. Wait until more data or a vaccine? You realize a vaccine may never happen? So, forever? You want years of lockdowns?

                  Like

                • Not years, not forever – one, single football season to buy time. There is still much we don’t know about this disease, but we learn more every few weeks. I’m not talking about shutdown, lockdown or hiding in a cave; we (at least I) am only addressing college football here. I think we are asking too much of the players who are already undercompensated and have little influence in this.
                  “The data says the risk in younger and healthier people is insanely low.” – Yes, fatalaties are low, but we no very little about long term consequences. Moreover, young people are very effective at spreading the virus which is one of the reasons the US still has high infection rates.
                  “It all says students going to class is fine” – Israel would disagree -https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/04/world/middleeast/coronavirus-israel-schools-reopen.html

                  Like

                • Napoleon BonerFart

                  Saxony had exactly the opposite experience of Germany. They even theorized that children act as a brake to the infection.

                  And the epidemiologists aren’t teachers. It’s a struggle to get kids to cover their mouths when they cough. Try to enforce mask wearing in a class of children. But while that would be difficult, it wouldn’t be impossible. But spacing children 6 feet apart is. Few school buildings even have that kind of square footage.

                  And of course, that doesn’t address the desirability of turning school into a fearful place of rules and distance. Where the goal is no longer education and development, but simply maintaining a pulse.

                  Like

      • Isn’t this like using Danny Wuerffel’s contracting Guillain-Barre syndrome to say we shouldn’t take the flu shot? I’m sure that’s considered conspiracy-theorist level thinking (one anecdotal story should impact the decisions of the masses), but cancelling our lives and returning to our prisons because one person suffered “potential” effects is just good science.

        If VaTech was so lax in protocols, I’m sure there was a widespread outbreak with many players affected and some in the hospital. Odds are, right? Any news story confirming what science has predicted with unprecedented certainty to happen when unmasked people get together and exert themselves? I’d be happy to read the fallout of such disregard to good science.

        Like

        • … but cancelling our lives and returning to our prisons because one person suffered “potential” effects is just good science…

          What’s with this “our” stuff? Unless you’re suiting up and playing, you’re not part of this discussion. The kid isn’t arguing what you should do. He’s assessing personal risk and risk to his family.

          Like

          • In fairness, he’s not suiting up and playing, so I guess he isn’t part of the discussion either.

            The kid isn’t arguing what I should do, merely expressing his concern. I have no problem with his decision. I think the question that needs to be answered is whether his concerns are legitimate or overblown by social media. We are treating football like it is the single most likely way that any of these players will contract the virus. I don’t think that is the case. I don’t have any scientific studies to back me up (not that it would matter), but there aren’t any that disprove me either. The discussion starts with that as the accepted premise because that is what we have been told. Unless you are doing contact-tracing to see who has been where with whom, then all of it is guessing.

            For example, the 28 players on Rutgers who tested positive can be tied back, according to the NJ state health commissioner, to a party the players attended. They didn’t contract it from playing football, but the sentiment of the public at-large is that this is a football problem because football players got it so we cannot allow them to play football. Not only that, but the players themselves say it is the schools’ responsibility to guarantee their safety, and since they can’t, the schools need to compensate the players for the risk they are taking by playing football.

            Is the worry that players will get it on the field and take it home or get it at home and take it to the field? Is football the bogeyman or the straw man?

            Of course, I know that all this really is just a diversion from what really rustles the jimmies. The fact that players are organizing and pushing back and demanding a larger slice of the pie is what makes this newsworthy. The COVID part is just the spark that made the whole thing go boom.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

              Great points all.

              Like

            • Derek

              The donors who shouldn’t get any of their money back, even if they can’t attend games, would just blow it on tats and weed if it was given back.

              Btw: Any player who chooses not to play would engage in any number of as or more risky behaviors than football, just because I say so.

              He may say he’s isolating and taking the risk of spread seriously, but you and I know better, don’t we?

              Isn’t entitled presumptuousness fun!

              Liked by 1 person

      • Napoleon BonerFart

        Like

    • W Cobb Dawg

      The simple fact that campuses will be closed to non-athlete students of the same age flies in the face of your argument regarding risk.

      The younger, low risk, segment of the population doesn’t live in a box. They leave the school or playing field and spread the virus to others having higher risk. How many tens-of-thousands of deaths is it gonna take before this basic idea can be absorbed?

      Like

    • PTC DAWG

      This in no way advances the narrative that Orange Man is bad and must go…that’s it in a nutshell…

      Liked by 1 person

  5. “We’ve already established that. Now we’re just trying to determine the extent.” Or something like that.
    That’s what comes to mind anymore, especially after seeing the demand list from players. From here on it’s a negotiation.

    Like

    • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

      A negotiation with little leverage. More than any sport, CFB has a limited lifecycle for players with their replacements with either slightly worse, or sometimes even better skill levels literally a year away. This Huma person is leading these players off a cliff.

      Like

      • The part I left out was “I guess we’ll see who swings the bigger club.”
        The players have some leverage but it will take a sizable majority of them to pull off a negotiation. Since almost all the information we get on anything these days is anecdotal, I wonder if the numbers among players are there?

        Liked by 1 person

        • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

          I guarantee it isn’t.

          Remember a few years ago when Huma tried to do this with Northwestern? The media breathlessly reported they had “the entire team” behind them?

          It was Huma and one player. That was it.

          Like

        • I’m trying to get this “their getting organized” but really. Just loud social media pronouncements.

          Like

  6. Junkyardawg41

    “ if you honestly believed before this season that players were being fairly compensated for their efforts, now that the COVID risk has been added to the pot, how can you argue they’re still being fairly compensated when nothing has changed on that side of the equation?” To understand your question more, would you also say teachers, paramedics, nurses also have the same equation without change in compensation?

    Like

    • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

      More than anything else, and I think the Senator made this point yesterday, this is 100% a failure on Emmert and the NCAA’s part. If they didn’t fight, and are still fighting, so hard against the NIL rights that should belong to any college athlete, something like this wouldn’t have cropped up, covid-19 or not.

      The players are owed what they’re owed, which is the rights to their names and likeness. It is immoral to keep that from them ESPECIALLY because they’re not professional athletes. You can do that to professional athletes as part of a contract agreement. A scholarship agreement does not and should never be used to strip an athlete of their basics rights any other student on campus could enjoy.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Junkyardawg41

        For my understanding:
        Do you really think this effort in its entirety would have been avoided with NLI reform? or just delayed?
        Not sure what you mean by “basic rights.” If they are the same rights and benefits enjoyed by all students, shouldn’t the regular student have access to all the rights and benefits the student athlete enjoys?

        Like

        • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

          No, because the regular student isn’t doing what the student athlete is doing, in the same way a normal student wouldn’t have access to scholarship funds that an academic scholarship student would.

          However, students on any other scholarship and normal students, do not give up the rights to their name and likeness simply because they attend college, meaning if a normal student is an e-gamer, they can make as much money they want off of their name and likeness.

          Those rights should belong to the student athlete in the same way they belong to any other student, and trying to conflate that with what a scholarship athlete does get as opposed to what students don’t get is an attempt to change the parameters of the argument; it’s not the argument being made.

          Like

          • Dawgflan

            Agreed on both your posts above. I have mostly the same perspective.

            The simple fact is that anywhere else on campus, a student can get a scholarship while at the same time making money off of their skills, name, and popularity on their own personal time. Computer science scholar with a personal app, art scholar selling paintings at Jittery Joe’s, Grady scholar with a social media following, music scholar with downtown band gigs. The school has no control over any of this.

            Where it gets a little dicey is that research scholars (professors as well as students) can’t take the work product from a lab or school initiated project and profit off of it personally, and can’t typically make money from activities occurring on-campus and/or during work hours. There are all kinds IP issues there. Schools will argue something similar in order to keep all/most of the official merchandise/licensing money, even those with numbers/names, as well as anything related to team or on-campus activities. The athletes will argue their sport is already extra-curricular.

            But NIL rights for even the most basic – paid coaching gigs at high schools, social media revenue, off-campus signature events, etc. would go a long way.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Junkyardawg41

            Thanks for the clarification. I would think the distinction is all students have the same rights to NIL it’s just that the NCAA prohibits being on scholarship/participating in athletic events And profiting from NIL.

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            • Jdawg108

              For an insane example of this, look to Missy Franklin. Should have been able to cash in Olympic success for millions of dollars. Decided to swim for her team, and then flamed out the next Olympic cycle.

              Like

    • Granthams replacement

      Nurses and paramedics decided to pursue a career that involves infectious diseases. The risk of being infected by a disease was present before covid. If individuals believe the risk is too great the individual should change jobs. The market will adjust the compensation to the risk. Capitalism works, socialism/communism does not have the same results.

      School systems implement PPE for teachers who are at risk just like nurse PPE. Then the above applies to teachers.

      Like

      • Junkyardawg41

        If there is no adjustment in compensation for risk, is the market transmitting there is no risk?

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        • DawgPhan

          They are arguing that there is no increase in risk, so there should be no increase in compensation.

          Seems obvious that there has been an increase in risk, and things like Kroger paying hazard pay makes that pretty clear, since the market was paying an additional premium for the additional risk.

          Like

  7. “The only way a labor movement can be started is with a work stoppage.”

    So says a cross-country runner at the University of California.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. HirsuteDawg

    I’m happy for the players to get paid – they train, work hard and commit to a very demanding schedule of required attendance. Now with COVID they risk their present and future physical well being and earning ability (those that actually are able to play in the pros). Looks like we are approaching the point where college football / basketball as we know it transforms into a development or minor league – colleges will have to go back to a no scholarship model like the IVY league. Different but still tasty.

    Like

  9. ugafidelis

    And Dwayne Johnson just saved the XFL with a 15 mil cash injection. I think we’re about to see a mass exodus of the studs head over there.

    Like

    • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

      There will be some, but a “mass exodus” is a ridiculous expectation. There hasn’t been a “mass exodus” to the NBA D-league or to European basketball leagues.

      CFB programs will have better facilities, better coaches, and better overall training to get them to the NFL. Once NIL comes into fruition, why would they leave for the XFL? And that’s if the XFL even allows players under the age of 21.

      Like

      • ugafidelis

        I don’t know man. These are strange times. You’ve got players on a ledge, and you’ve got rich entertainer(s) who might see a business angle. Time will tell.

        Like

        • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

          I keep coming back to what are most player’s primary motivation? The great ones, the 5 and 4-star players, their primary motivation is getting to the NFL. Leaving from high school to the XFL won’t help them get there in the same way going from high school to European basketball leagues generally don’t help those players.

          The XFL, if they want to be anything, should become a developmental league for the NFL. Get 8 teams teams in states in the South and Midwest without an NFL team (Alabama, Mississippi, Kentucky, South Carolina, Iowa, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Kansas) and allow either each division to share a team or have one team from each division in a league share a team, where they put protected developmental players so those guys get playing time as well as leaving roster spots open for UDFA’s who aren’t signed to try out to play.

          And you have them play 14 games a year during the NFL season on Mondays only. This way, if there’s a need to “call up a player” you can do so for a Sunday game.

          Are you telling me NBC or CBS or FOX or the NFLN wouldn’t want to have games to put on television from 4-8 every Monday?

          Like

    • Don in Mar-a-Lago

      Can they smell what the Rock’s got cooking

      Like

  10. Ozam

    Where the heck is Derek? This entire thread is way too hospitable.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Derek

      There’s no way for me to both fairly respond to these obtuse comments and also meet the host’s strict requirements not to call stupid people stupid, no matter how richly earned, so I’m sitting it out.

      Like

      • Corch Irvin Meyers, New USC Corch (2021)

        Translation:

        I can’t argue against the available data without resorting to strawman arguments and ad hominem attacks.

        Like

        • JFC.

          You know, there’s no rule here requiring you to show your ass because somebody else shows theirs.

          I’m about ready to blow up the comments section because of some of you. And judging from the emails I’ve received, it sounds like I’ll be cheered on for doing so.

          Liked by 1 person

        • And admitted he has to name call to boot!

          Like

          • Derek

            Calling things what they are is apparently offensive to some.

            You have to be kind and accepting to and of stupid around here.

            Theres just so much stupid and such brazen stupidity that diplomacy can be a challenge.

            After all what can you say to people who are repeatedly told that covid stats are playpen so they use “data” instead, like its different?

            I know what I’d say, but I’m not allowed.

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            • Napoleon BonerFart

              Kudos on your restraint, Derek. Sure, you could just rail about stupidity, but you won’t. Commenting on how you’re not commenting on stupidity is much different than commenting on stupidity.
              #NotAllHeroesWearCapes

              Liked by 1 person

              • I would call you an asshat, bc that would prove my point so well, but it’s not right to call you an asshat, asshat.

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                • Derek

                  I don’t care.

                  Like

                • Either dispense with the personal insults, or dispense with the access to commenting.

                  Like

                • Dude. That was total sarcasm. Come on man. Your rule set is all over the map lately. That was clear sarcasm but there are commenters here that can straight up call you names and insults and it goes right by. I was making an obvious joke with someone that I comment with. Your response is to drop the hammer down.

                  I don’t get it. One time in 1 comment months ago I made a personal comment about Derek. I have never done anything before or since that was a personal attack. This was just satire about someone that continually insults people What someone that I have good exchanges with.

                  Geez.

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                • What hammer has been dropped?

                  Thanks. You’ve just about got me convinced to shut down commenting altogether.

                  Like

                • You would ban me for making a satirical joke with an Internet friend? When there are people here that day after day call names and insults?

                  The hammer was saying that you would ban me. After everything I’ve seen in this place this is highly personal, because there’s crap thrown left right up-and-down. I haven’t done anything except make a joke with the fellow commenter. I have gone way out of my way to ignore everything go thing Derek has said to me for months.

                  Wow. Been coming here since year 1. Yea, I dont get it. Man, wow. Whatever then.

                  Like

                • I didn’t threaten to ban you. I told you that if you continued with personal insults, I’d screen your comments.

                  Either that, or you’ve misconstrued my last comment. I’m not talking about banning you. I’m talking about closing comments to everyone.

                  You seem to be aware that this place is drowning in personal insults and bullshit. I’m tired of dealing with everyone’s nonsense and that includes trying to decipher who’s being sarcastic and who’s being a… well, asshat.

                  Sorry if you don’t get it.

                  Like

                • Ahhhhhh. Well alrighty then. apologies for adding to the fire then. Cheers

                  Like

                • I’m not mad at you, man. You just don’t don’t get how frustrating it’s become to run this blog.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • Well you know my take from way back on politics. Unfortunately Corona virus has created a window that makes that very difficult when it comes to college sports.

                  An operational pause of even just one week to a month aint necessarily a bad thing. I’d love to see even long form posts. – best

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                • I don’t know what I’m gonna do yet, but I can tell you whatever step or steps I wind up taking won’t be a pause.

                  Like

      • Ozam

        Your response is exactly why we need sports to return asap! Let’s argue about the Dawgs, something for which we all have a common love, and not serious societal and political issues. There is enough of that crap elsewhere. GTP should be a warm port in these cold stormy times.

        Like

  11. TripleB

    I agree with Corch that the virus risk is not a valid risk to shut down the season or shut down school/college. The reason the athletes have a valid complaint is they are not in the same position as others who can make a decision to face the risk in exchange for their rightful reward, i.e. pay.

    The NCAA ought to immediately allow NIL rights, and the NFL ought to eliminate the requirement that kids play three years before being drafted. Actually, Congress ought to do it so neither NFL or NCAA can hold it up. Then the kids can either play or not. No one would then have a valid ground to bitch. If you don’t think college football gives you enough (tuition, board, stipend, NIL), or if you think it is too dangerous, then move on to the free market. Of course this won’t happen, not because Congress has more important issues to address, but because Congress doesn’t do anything any more.

    The frustrating thing about this website lately is that we read all these great teases about UGA football, and then all these articles and opinions that we shouldn’t play this year. I get all my UGA news here. That’s why I like it. I don’t enjoy all the sentiment that we should not have a season.

    My prediction–we won’t have a season because the schools and colleges will have to bow to the overwhelming pressure from teachers, professors, and politically motivated people who want it cancelled. Football will be one of many things to suffer from an overreaction. College football, like many other aspects of our culture, will suffer long after the virus is gone. The cure will be worse than the disease.

    Like

  12. ASEF

    It’s not complicated.

    We had bunch of politicians make a bet that the summer would put the virus on hold. They lost that bet spectacularly. Now we’re hitting the end of the summer, and we’ve got hundreds of thousands of active cases.

    My greatest fear with this virus is not getting it myself. It’s passing it to someone else with some vulnerability. Like my wife or my mom. My mother in law. Co-workers. The inability of some people to add that to other people’s risk calculations is jaw-dropping to me.

    These players are more than football players. No one on this board is weighing Covid 19 solely in terms of their primary occupation.

    The same people who are insisting this is all overblown and zero risk are in large part the same ones who, back in March, were shouting down the people who were contemplating 100,000 deaths in 2020. We’re over 150,000 with 5 months to go.

    There are plenty of articles about young healthy people ending up in ICUs with lingering effects or even dead. No, it’s not statistically likely, but that’s small comfort to the families that have been affected.

    Europe has sports. Europe has their virus under control. Europe took a different approach, and they were proven right.

    It’s a shame we’ve put our players and schools and football programs in this position. It didn’t have to be this way, and maybe the ones howling about how ridiculous they are all being might admit they’ve been wrong every step of the way on this virus to this point.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Napoleon BonerFart

      The need of the fearful to engage in the conceit of having control over that which cannot be controlled has driven the world mad in hopes some magic talisman or leader will protect us.

      But none of it is real.

      It’s a drowning swimmer clutching at an anvil. – @boriquagato

      Liked by 1 person

    • Back with the bloody Europe bits again. Just move there. Seriously. Sweeden did jack shit , do they count as europe?

      Like

      • ASEF

        “ During the months of March to early June, all shops were practically empty, people stopped dining with friends, and families stopped seeing even their closest relatives,” Furberg told MedPage Today. “A lock-down could not have been more effective. Handwashing, excessive use of hand sanitizers, and staying home at the first sign of a cold became the new normal very quickly.”

        Sounds like more than “jack shit” to me.

        https://www.medpagetoday.com/infectiousdisease/covid19/87812

        Were you one of the people back in March predicting this would all go away over the summer? Death toll of less than 10k? Everything back to total normal by fall? I don’t remember that.

        Germany’s restaurant business is back to pre-Covid levels. That’s what an aggressive testing and tracing strategy buys you.

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        • Napoleon BonerFart

          Europe got it right. They’re eating out and playing soccer.

          Sure, their death rates are higher than the USA, but who cares about that?
          #Science

          Liked by 1 person

        • If you combine European nations their death per 100k is not less than ours. Certsin european nations are way worse than us Our cases are higher bc we have millions more tested. You clearly repeat cnn talking points. The outlier is Germany, but no one can explain why it seems.

          Like

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